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Who was the bridegroom?

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  • A J
    Greetings So who was the bridegroom at the marriage in Cana of Galilee? Jesus? Perhaps we should attack the question by first trying to ascertain precisely how
    Message 1 of 1 , May 1, 2005
      Greetings

      So who was the bridegroom at the marriage in Cana of
      Galilee? Jesus? Perhaps we should attack the question
      by first trying to ascertain precisely how many guests
      there were.

      Firstly, I would point out that the first guest
      mentioned is, in fact, Jesus' mother: "And the third
      day there was a marriage in Cana of Galilee; and the
      mother of Jesus was there:" (John 2,1).

      So what are the precedents for women attending wedding
      parties? Given the status of women in Israel (even
      Hellenised Israel), I would have to say that this one
      statement tells us that Jesus' mother was not only
      present at the wedding, but also that she was a very
      powerful, very important figure (hence the murder of
      her son).

      It is often claimed that the number of pots 'after the
      manner of the purifying of the Jews' is an indicator
      of the number of guests - six pots, therefore six
      guests.

      Yet Strongs provides us with this piece of
      information-:

      http://www.blueletterbible.org/tmp_dir/words/7/1114933213-8961.html

      "And he saith unto them, Draw out now, and bear unto
      the governor of the feast. And they bare it.
      "When the ruler of the feast had tasted the water that
      was made wine, and knew not whence it was: (but the
      servants which drew the water knew;) the governor of
      the feast called the bridegroom," (John 2.8-9)

      The terms 'governor of the feast' and 'ruler of the
      feast' are Greek architriklinos, a word which actually
      tells us that there were only three couches - three
      couches, therefore three guests.

      So were there two pots for washing per guest, or were
      half the guests women who did not indulge in the
      drinking games which followed Hellenic supper? The
      fact that Jesus' mother was present when the wine ran
      out suggests the former, and so there appear to have
      been only three guests.

      The foregoing is even more startling when considered
      that John 2.2 tells us that 'both Jesus was called,
      and his disciples, to the marriage' - a). I can hardly
      envisage that the bridegroom would have been called to
      his own marriage, so I doubt that this was Jesus'
      wedding; and b). Jesus' disciples do not appear to
      have been guests - this means that they must have been
      the servants whom Jesus ordered (this actually makes
      perfect sense, given both the talk of masters and
      servants switching places and the Roman festivity of
      the Saturnalia).

      But what of Jesus himself? If his disciples were
      called, yet were not guests, is there any reason to
      assume that Jesus was? Was Jesus a guest, or merely
      master of servants?

      So, three quests, one of whom was Jesus' mother, the
      other the 'governor of the feast' (who was neither
      bridegroom, nor Jesus) - so who occupied the third
      couch?

      aj

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