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George - Shalim! An Earth-Shaking Equation

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  • A J
    George, Firstly, Solomon had a city named after him; Jerusalem, the Place of Peace . Secondly, there is his birth. The second male child born to a woman named
    Message 1 of 11 , Apr 1, 2004
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      George,

      Firstly, Solomon had a city named after him;
      Jerusalem, "the Place of Peace".

      Secondly, there is his birth. The second male child
      born to a woman named Bath-sheba (which means
      something like "the Daughter of (the Number) Seven" or
      "the Seventh Daughter"), her first born is of even
      greater interest to me; the illegitimate child of
      David and this woman, he invites her innocent husband
      to the palace, where the latter firstly abstains and
      then indulges his passions before being sent out upon
      the battlefield to be slain in what looks very much
      like a human sacrifice intended to bring victory,
      which it does. Then the child is born, sick, and dies,
      unnamed, on it's seventh day. Enter Solomon, the man
      of peace.

      But before there was Solomon, there was Absolom. And
      one would be entitled to assume that his rise to
      power, his father's brief abdication from the throne,
      and his own eventual death at the hands of Joab
      (hanging, suspended between heaven and earth, in an
      oak tree, I might add) were purely political were it
      not for the meaning of his name: "the Father of
      Solom". David sent his men out against his own son,
      and despite his entreating them to deal leniently with
      him, he effectively killed ... himself, for he was
      "the Father of Solom", whether Solom be a man, a city
      or a state of mind. And this too looks very much like
      a human sacrifice, a case of "the son dying in the
      stead of the father".

      And what of all this? These people might be one and
      the same person; but whereas the king lives in history
      and the god dies in myth, here attributes are switched
      until one can no longer tell the two apart. And the
      writers, writing some 600 years after the event, with
      ulterior motives of their own, could hardly be trusted
      to give an accurate account of those times and
      happenings, even if they had wanted to.

      ad spiritum
      Chrysippus

      Find local movie times and trailers on Yahoo! Movies.
      http://au.movies.yahoo.com
    • George
      AJ, I agree with all of your points suggesting a skeptical view of these conventional bible personalities.... with one exception. I do not agree that Solomon
      Message 2 of 11 , Apr 1, 2004
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        AJ,

        I agree with all of your points suggesting a
        skeptical view of these conventional bible
        personalities.... with one exception.

        I do not agree that "Solomon had a city named
        after him." Perhaps you meant to say what I
        do believe, which is that a fictional king was
        GIVEN a name that could be linked to the capitol
        of Ur-Shlomo (Jerusalem).

        Regards,

        George

        --- In AncientBibleHistory@yahoogroups.com, A J <andrej1234au@y...>
        wrote:
        > George,
        >
        > Firstly, Solomon had a city named after him;
        > Jerusalem, "the Place of Peace".
        >
        > Secondly, there is his birth. The second male child
        > born to a woman named Bath-sheba (which means
        > something like "the Daughter of (the Number) Seven" or
        > "the Seventh Daughter"), her first born is of even
        > greater interest to me; the illegitimate child of
        > David and this woman, he invites her innocent husband
        > to the palace, where the latter firstly abstains and
        > then indulges his passions before being sent out upon
        > the battlefield to be slain in what looks very much
        > like a human sacrifice intended to bring victory,
        > which it does. Then the child is born, sick, and dies,
        > unnamed, on it's seventh day. Enter Solomon, the man
        > of peace.
        >
        > But before there was Solomon, there was Absolom. And
        > one would be entitled to assume that his rise to
        > power, his father's brief abdication from the throne,
        > and his own eventual death at the hands of Joab
        > (hanging, suspended between heaven and earth, in an
        > oak tree, I might add) were purely political were it
        > not for the meaning of his name: "the Father of
        > Solom". David sent his men out against his own son,
        > and despite his entreating them to deal leniently with
        > him, he effectively killed ... himself, for he was
        > "the Father of Solom", whether Solom be a man, a city
        > or a state of mind. And this too looks very much like
        > a human sacrifice, a case of "the son dying in the
        > stead of the father".
        >
        > And what of all this? These people might be one and
        > the same person; but whereas the king lives in history
        > and the god dies in myth, here attributes are switched
        > until one can no longer tell the two apart. And the
        > writers, writing some 600 years after the event, with
        > ulterior motives of their own, could hardly be trusted
        > to give an accurate account of those times and
        > happenings, even if they had wanted to.
        >
        > ad spiritum
        > Chrysippus
        >
        > Find local movie times and trailers on Yahoo! Movies.
        > http://au.movies.yahoo.com
      • Holly Aldahir
        George: Jerusalem does not mean the city of peace. It means the city of the evening star god, Shalem. Hope this Helps Holly ...
        Message 3 of 11 , Apr 1, 2004
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          George:
          Jerusalem does not mean the city of peace. It means
          the city of the evening star god, Shalem.
          Hope this Helps
          Holly


          --- George <historynow2002@...> wrote:
          > AJ,
          >
          > I agree with all of your points suggesting a
          > skeptical view of these conventional bible
          > personalities.... with one exception.
          >
          > I do not agree that "Solomon had a city named
          > after him." Perhaps you meant to say what I
          > do believe, which is that a fictional king was
          > GIVEN a name that could be linked to the capitol
          > of Ur-Shlomo (Jerusalem).
          >
          > Regards,
          >
          > George
          >
          > --- In AncientBibleHistory@yahoogroups.com, A J
          > <andrej1234au@y...>
          > wrote:
          > > George,
          > >
          > > Firstly, Solomon had a city named after him;
          > > Jerusalem, "the Place of Peace".
          > >
          > > Secondly, there is his birth. The second male
          > child
          > > born to a woman named Bath-sheba (which means
          > > something like "the Daughter of (the Number)
          > Seven" or
          > > "the Seventh Daughter"), her first born is of even
          > > greater interest to me; the illegitimate child of
          > > David and this woman, he invites her innocent
          > husband
          > > to the palace, where the latter firstly abstains
          > and
          > > then indulges his passions before being sent out
          > upon
          > > the battlefield to be slain in what looks very
          > much
          > > like a human sacrifice intended to bring victory,
          > > which it does. Then the child is born, sick, and
          > dies,
          > > unnamed, on it's seventh day. Enter Solomon, the
          > man
          > > of peace.
          > >
          > > But before there was Solomon, there was Absolom.
          > And
          > > one would be entitled to assume that his rise to
          > > power, his father's brief abdication from the
          > throne,
          > > and his own eventual death at the hands of Joab
          > > (hanging, suspended between heaven and earth, in
          > an
          > > oak tree, I might add) were purely political were
          > it
          > > not for the meaning of his name: "the Father of
          > > Solom". David sent his men out against his own
          > son,
          > > and despite his entreating them to deal leniently
          > with
          > > him, he effectively killed ... himself, for he was
          > > "the Father of Solom", whether Solom be a man, a
          > city
          > > or a state of mind. And this too looks very much
          > like
          > > a human sacrifice, a case of "the son dying in the
          > > stead of the father".
          > >
          > > And what of all this? These people might be one
          > and
          > > the same person; but whereas the king lives in
          > history
          > > and the god dies in myth, here attributes are
          > switched
          > > until one can no longer tell the two apart. And
          > the
          > > writers, writing some 600 years after the event,
          > with
          > > ulterior motives of their own, could hardly be
          > trusted
          > > to give an accurate account of those times and
          > > happenings, even if they had wanted to.
          > >
          > > ad spiritum
          > > Chrysippus
          > >
          > > Find local movie times and trailers on Yahoo!
          > Movies.
          > > http://au.movies.yahoo.com
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
          >
          > CONTACT ABH MODERATORS:
          > AncientBibleHistory-owner@yahoogroups.com
          >
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          > http://www.angelfire.com/or3/ancientbiblehistory/
          >
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          >
          http://www.groups.yahoo.com/group/AncientBibleHistory
          >
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          > http://www.groups.yahoo.com/group/AncientBibleStudy
          >
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          >
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          >
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          >
          > AncientBibleHistory-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
          >
          >
        • George
          Holly, Would it surprise if you if the evening star was associated with Nergal or Molech? George
          Message 4 of 11 , Apr 1, 2004
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            Holly,

            Would it surprise if you if the "evening star"
            was associated with Nergal or Molech?

            George

            --- In AncientBibleHistory@yahoogroups.com, Holly Aldahir <gmrf@y...>
            wrote:
            > George:
            > Jerusalem does not mean the city of peace. It means
            > the city of the evening star god, Shalem.
            > Hope this Helps
            > Holly
            >
            >
            > --- George <historynow2002@y...> wrote:
            > > AJ,
            > >
            > > I agree with all of your points suggesting a
            > > skeptical view of these conventional bible
            > > personalities.... with one exception.
            > >
            > > I do not agree that "Solomon had a city named
            > > after him." Perhaps you meant to say what I
            > > do believe, which is that a fictional king was
            > > GIVEN a name that could be linked to the capitol
            > > of Ur-Shlomo (Jerusalem).
            > >
            > > Regards,
            > >
            > > George
            > >
            > > --- In AncientBibleHistory@yahoogroups.com, A J
            > > <andrej1234au@y...>
            > > wrote:
            > > > George,
            > > >
            > > > Firstly, Solomon had a city named after him;
            > > > Jerusalem, "the Place of Peace".
            > > >
            > > > Secondly, there is his birth. The second male
            > > child
            > > > born to a woman named Bath-sheba (which means
            > > > something like "the Daughter of (the Number)
            > > Seven" or
            > > > "the Seventh Daughter"), her first born is of even
            > > > greater interest to me; the illegitimate child of
            > > > David and this woman, he invites her innocent
            > > husband
            > > > to the palace, where the latter firstly abstains
            > > and
            > > > then indulges his passions before being sent out
            > > upon
            > > > the battlefield to be slain in what looks very
            > > much
            > > > like a human sacrifice intended to bring victory,
            > > > which it does. Then the child is born, sick, and
            > > dies,
            > > > unnamed, on it's seventh day. Enter Solomon, the
            > > man
            > > > of peace.
            > > >
            > > > But before there was Solomon, there was Absolom.
            > > And
            > > > one would be entitled to assume that his rise to
            > > > power, his father's brief abdication from the
            > > throne,
            > > > and his own eventual death at the hands of Joab
            > > > (hanging, suspended between heaven and earth, in
            > > an
            > > > oak tree, I might add) were purely political were
            > > it
            > > > not for the meaning of his name: "the Father of
            > > > Solom". David sent his men out against his own
            > > son,
            > > > and despite his entreating them to deal leniently
            > > with
            > > > him, he effectively killed ... himself, for he was
            > > > "the Father of Solom", whether Solom be a man, a
            > > city
            > > > or a state of mind. And this too looks very much
            > > like
            > > > a human sacrifice, a case of "the son dying in the
            > > > stead of the father".
            > > >
            > > > And what of all this? These people might be one
            > > and
            > > > the same person; but whereas the king lives in
            > > history
            > > > and the god dies in myth, here attributes are
            > > switched
            > > > until one can no longer tell the two apart. And
            > > the
            > > > writers, writing some 600 years after the event,
            > > with
            > > > ulterior motives of their own, could hardly be
            > > trusted
            > > > to give an accurate account of those times and
            > > > happenings, even if they had wanted to.
            > > >
            > > > ad spiritum
            > > > Chrysippus
            > > >
            > > > Find local movie times and trailers on Yahoo!
            > > Movies.
            > > > http://au.movies.yahoo.com
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
            > >
            > > CONTACT ABH MODERATORS:
            > > AncientBibleHistory-owner@yahoogroups.com
            > >
            > > ABH WEBPAGE:
            > > http://www.angelfire.com/or3/ancientbiblehistory/
            > >
            > > ABH GROUP PAGE:
            > >
            > http://www.groups.yahoo.com/group/AncientBibleHistory
            > >
            > > ABS GROUP PAGE:
            > > http://www.groups.yahoo.com/group/AncientBibleStudy
            > >
            > > PUBLIC ARCHIVES:
            > > http://www.eScribe.com/religion/AncientBibleHistory/
            > >
            > > Yahoo! Groups Links
            > >
            > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/AncientBibleHistory/
            > >
            > > AncientBibleHistory-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            > >
            > >
            > >
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