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religious studies and history

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  • houmeri
    ... I can t help feeling that a degree in history is a little more valid when it comes to discussing history. (Not saying that people without degrees in
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 30, 2003
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      Peter wrote:

      > about the whole evidence for the existence of Jesus thing I asked my
      > friend who has a degree in religious studies.

      I can't help feeling that a degree in history is a little more valid
      when it
      comes to discussing history. (Not saying that people without degrees in
      history can't do just as good a job, but a degree in religion doesn't
      mean a
      lot when discussing history!)


      I'm new to this list and just reading so far, BUT I have to jump in here.

      I have a degree in History/Archaeology and another in Religious/Social Studies, plus post-graduate teaching qualifications in both, plus several years of teaching at college level.
      It is certainly NOT true that a teacher of Religious Studies is a teacher of Religion. In Religious Studies you are teaching a critical approach to religious texts, organisations and experiences. You are not teaching the "faith"; we leave that to Ministers of Religion.
      The academic discipline involved in the study of religions is just as rigorous as that of historians; at least it is in the UK and I have no doubt that holds true of the USA also.
      Norma
    • ethel jean saltz
      Good point!! There are history profs who even teach history with a Marxist slant, anti-USA slant, anti-religious slant. I even had high school English teachers
      Message 2 of 3 , May 1, 2003
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        Good point!! There are history profs who even teach history with a Marxist
        slant, anti-USA slant, anti-religious slant. I even had high school English
        teachers doing this with history during Viet Nam.

        houmeri wrote:
        > The academic discipline involved in the study of religions is just as rigorous as that of historians; at least it is in the UK and I have no doubt that holds true of the USA also.
        > Norma

        --
        Be-ahavah oo-ve-shalom oo-ve-emet, Ethel Jean Saltz
        Salaam Ismail, Shalom Isaac Don't Hate -> Educate
        LANGUAGE, TRUTH AND LOGIC, A. J. Ayers
        mailto: nietgal@...
      • Djehuti Sundaka
        ... my ... in ... doesn t ... here. ... Religious/Social Studies, plus post-graduate teaching qualifications in both, plus several years of teaching at college
        Message 3 of 3 , May 1, 2003
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          --- In AncientBibleHistory@yahoogroups.com, "houmeri" <houmeri@y...>
          wrote:
          > Peter wrote:
          >
          > > about the whole evidence for the existence of Jesus thing I asked
          my
          > > friend who has a degree in religious studies.
          >
          > I can't help feeling that a degree in history is a little more valid
          > when it
          > comes to discussing history. (Not saying that people without degrees
          in
          > history can't do just as good a job, but a degree in religion
          doesn't
          > mean a
          > lot when discussing history!)
          >
          >
          > I'm new to this list and just reading so far, BUT I have to jump in
          here.
          >
          > I have a degree in History/Archaeology and another in
          Religious/Social Studies, plus post-graduate teaching qualifications
          in both, plus several years of teaching at college level.
          > It is certainly NOT true that a teacher of Religious Studies is a
          teacher of Religion. In Religious Studies you are teaching a critical
          approach to religious texts, organisations and experiences. You are
          not teaching the "faith"; we leave that to Ministers of Religion.
          > The academic discipline involved in the study of religions is just
          as rigorous as that of historians; at least it is in the UK and I have
          no doubt that holds true of the USA also.
          > Norma


          I would have to concur by adding that the discipline of "Comparative
          Religion" in the states involves much history pertaining to each
          religion being studied. From my personal experience, history is
          inseparable from the study. That's why I had specified an "academic"
          degree in my reply in the other thread as I don't know what would be
          involved in a degree awarded from a religious institution. In fact,
          unless one is specifically focused on the history of a religion, I
          don't think a history degree would be of much value either.

          Djehuti Sundaka
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