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My First Ferret

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  • Kalia
    Hello All, I m brand new to this whole ferret ownership (lifestyle) and I wouldn t mind some helpful advice. I m in North Texas and I m really not sure what
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 30, 2003
      Hello All,

      I'm brand new to this whole ferret ownership (lifestyle) and I
      wouldn't mind some helpful advice. I'm in North Texas and I'm really
      not sure what the best option for "obtaining" my first ferret is.
      Some people say shelters are best and others say baby ferrets all the
      way! I've done some reading (Ferrets for Dummies) begun ferret
      proofing my house and done some cold calling, but I still feel like
      I'm missing something. I've even checked city ordinances and looked
      into vets and registration fees.

      I would truly appreciate some (constructive please) input and
      suggestions, especially from "seasoned veterans" (experienced owners)
      because I want to make sure that acquiring a ferret is in mine and
      the ferrets best interest.

      Thanks

      Kalia
    • greensky042
      I got my 2 from a shelter. Personally I think the shelter is the way to go. Shelter Mom s and Dad s can give you an idea of the ferrets personality, likes and
      Message 2 of 5 , Jul 1, 2003
        I got my 2 from a shelter. Personally I think the shelter is the way
        to go. Shelter Mom's and Dad's can give you an idea of the ferrets
        personality, likes and dislikes. They can give you good advise on what
        type of setup you should have too, and what kind of food to feed them.
        Consider getting at least 2 ferrets, they are such social creatures
        and like to play rough together and sleep cuddled together too. I had
        to go out of state(I'm in dumb Calif) to a ferret shelter to get mine.
        The thought of a sweet little baby kit is very appealing to me too,
        but you still have to potty train them and teach them not to nip. I'm
        sure someone with more experience will be able to give you more
        advice. Good luck to you.




        --- In AmericanFerretAssociation@yahoogroups.com, "Kalia"
        <candii_mail@y...> wrote:
        > Hello All,
        >
        > I'm brand new to this whole ferret ownership (lifestyle) and I
        > wouldn't mind some helpful advice. I'm in North Texas and I'm really
        > not sure what the best option for "obtaining" my first ferret is.
        > Some people say shelters are best and others say baby ferrets all
        the
        > way! I've done some reading (Ferrets for Dummies) begun ferret
        > proofing my house and done some cold calling, but I still feel like
        > I'm missing something. I've even checked city ordinances and looked
        > into vets and registration fees.
        >
        > I would truly appreciate some (constructive please) input and
        > suggestions, especially from "seasoned veterans" (experienced
        owners)
        > because I want to make sure that acquiring a ferret is in mine and
        > the ferrets best interest.
        >
        > Thanks
        >
        > Kalia
      • Karen Balle
        ... Getting a ferret from a shelter doesn t mean that you can t also get a kit. I recently got my first two ferrets (last week). I went in for one but came
        Message 3 of 5 , Jul 2, 2003
          On Mon, 30 Jun 2003 16:34:08 -0000, Kalia wrote:
          >Hello All,
          >
          >I'm brand new to this whole ferret ownership (lifestyle) and I
          >wouldn't mind some helpful advice. I'm in North Texas and I'm really
          > not sure what the best option for "obtaining" my first ferret is.
          >Some people say shelters are best and others say baby ferrets all
          >the way! I've done some reading (Ferrets for Dummies) begun ferret
          >proofing my house and done some cold calling, but I still feel like
          >I'm missing something. I've even checked city ordinances and looked
          >into vets and registration fees.

          Getting a ferret from a shelter doesn't mean that you can't also get
          a kit. I recently got my first two ferrets (last week). I went in
          for one but came out with a bonded pair. Sometimes, these things
          just happen. Anyway, when I put in my application to adopt a ferret,
          I essentially told them that I'd prefer a younger lighter-colored
          female, but if we could find one that was a good match, it didn't
          matter to me what it looked like or how old it was. I ended up with
          a two-year-old panda male and a six-year-old black sable female.

          While the younger one is definitely more bouncy and funnier to watch,
          I am glad that I also ended up with the older one. Baker is much
          more mellow than Cecil. She's more likely to come up for a snuggle
          than he is and when he has me frustrated with something that is
          proving difficult to train him about, she reminds me that it can be
          done.

          I don't know what your tolerance levels or patience are like. I've
          had good luck with training my own dogs and cats (yes, cats, when I
          had some that I really wanted to work with) and grew up around
          animals. I'll tell you honestly that I've only had them for a little
          over a week and there's already been a few times when I wondered if
          taking on Cecil wasn't a bit much. (Mostly when my boyfriend is
          supposed to be watching him and I'm trying to sleep and Cecil is
          trying to dig his way through a closet door.)

          >I would truly appreciate some (constructive please) input and
          >suggestions, especially from "seasoned veterans" (experienced
          >owners) because I want to make sure that acquiring a ferret is in
          >mine and the ferrets best interest.

          You definitely seem to be going about it the right way. There comes
          a point where you've done all the research that you can and it's time
          to take the plunge. When you feel comfortable about the decision
          that you've made, you'll know it's time. Of course, there's always a
          little bit of nervousness when getting a new animal, moreso if you
          haven't had any of that species before. The most important thing
          when getting ANY new pet is to be honest with yourself about what you
          are and are not willing to do throughout your pet's entire life.

          --
          Karen Balle
          kballe@...
        • greensky042
          ... Just a mention on why you might be having a tougher time training your male panda. He is probably deaf. Most Panda s, Blazes and some DEW s are deaf. It s
          Message 4 of 5 , Jul 2, 2003
            --- In AmericanFerretAssociation@yahoogroups.com, Karen Balle
            <kballe@r...> wrote:
            > On Mon, 30 Jun 2003 16:34:08 -0000, Kalia wrote:

            Just a mention on why you might be having a tougher time training your
            male panda. He is probably deaf. Most Panda's, Blazes and some DEW's
            are deaf. It's a gene they carry that makes them deaf or defines them
            as deaf, not sure exactly. It's usually not a problem though. I have a
            deaf panda/blaze little girl. The only time it's a problem is when
            she's gone off to sleep somewhere and I can't find her. With my boy I
            can shake a treat can and he will come running, but since she can't
            hear me, I have to so search in all her secret places. Sometimes she
            has to look around to see if I'm calling for her, she seems to have a
            sense that she needs to look at me. She's also half blind(thanks to
            the cat). Some people never know their ferret is deaf. If there are
            other ferrets, they will just do whatever the others are doing,
            therefore you might not know he/she is deaf. If he is deaf, don't
            worry about it too much, it's really no big deal, they get along very
            well without their hearing.




            >Hello All,
            > >
            > >I'm brand new to this whole ferret ownership (lifestyle) and I
            > >wouldn't mind some helpful advice. I'm in North Texas and I'm
            really
            > > not sure what the best option for "obtaining" my first ferret is.
            > >Some people say shelters are best and others say baby ferrets all
            > >the way! I've done some reading (Ferrets for Dummies) begun ferret
            > >proofing my house and done some cold calling, but I still feel like
            > >I'm missing something. I've even checked city ordinances and looked
            > >into vets and registration fees.
            >
            > Getting a ferret from a shelter doesn't mean that you can't also get
            > a kit. I recently got my first two ferrets (last week). I went in
            > for one but came out with a bonded pair. Sometimes, these things
            > just happen. Anyway, when I put in my application to adopt a
            ferret,
            > I essentially told them that I'd prefer a younger lighter-colored
            > female, but if we could find one that was a good match, it didn't
            > matter to me what it looked like or how old it was. I ended up with
            > a two-year-old panda male and a six-year-old black sable female.
            >
            > While the younger one is definitely more bouncy and funnier to
            watch,
            > I am glad that I also ended up with the older one. Baker is much
            > more mellow than Cecil. She's more likely to come up for a snuggle
            > than he is and when he has me frustrated with something that is
            > proving difficult to train him about, she reminds me that it can be
            > done.
            >
            > I don't know what your tolerance levels or patience are like. I've
            > had good luck with training my own dogs and cats (yes, cats, when I
            > had some that I really wanted to work with) and grew up around
            > animals. I'll tell you honestly that I've only had them for a
            little
            > over a week and there's already been a few times when I wondered if
            > taking on Cecil wasn't a bit much. (Mostly when my boyfriend is
            > supposed to be watching him and I'm trying to sleep and Cecil is
            > trying to dig his way through a closet door.)
            >
            > >I would truly appreciate some (constructive please) input and
            > >suggestions, especially from "seasoned veterans" (experienced
            > >owners) because I want to make sure that acquiring a ferret is in
            > >mine and the ferrets best interest.
            >
            > You definitely seem to be going about it the right way. There comes
            > a point where you've done all the research that you can and it's
            time
            > to take the plunge. When you feel comfortable about the decision
            > that you've made, you'll know it's time. Of course, there's always
            a
            > little bit of nervousness when getting a new animal, moreso if you
            > haven't had any of that species before. The most important thing
            > when getting ANY new pet is to be honest with yourself about what
            you
            > are and are not willing to do throughout your pet's entire life.
            >
            > --
            > Karen Balle
            > kballe@r...
          • Karen Balle
            ... I don t think he s deaf, but I m fairly certain that he is hard of hearing. He s responded to high pitches in some music and he ll respond if you YELL!
            Message 5 of 5 , Jul 4, 2003
              On Wed, 02 Jul 2003 22:44:23 -0000, greensky042 wrote:
              >--- In AmericanFerretAssociation@yahoogroups.com, Karen Balle
              ><kballe@r...> wrote:
              >>On Mon, 30 Jun 2003 16:34:08 -0000, Kalia wrote:
              >
              >Just a mention on why you might be having a tougher time training
              >your male panda. He is probably deaf. Most Panda's, Blazes and some
              >DEW's are deaf. It's a gene they carry that makes them deaf or
              >defines them as deaf, not sure exactly. It's usually not a problem
              >though. I have a deaf panda/blaze little girl. The only time it's a
              >problem is when she's gone off to sleep somewhere and I can't find
              >her. With my boy I can shake a treat can and he will come running,
              >but since she can't hear me, I have to so search in all her secret
              >places. Sometimes she has to look around to see if I'm calling for
              >her, she seems to have a sense that she needs to look at me. She's
              >also half blind(thanks to the cat). Some people never know their
              >ferret is deaf. If there are other ferrets, they will just do
              >whatever the others are doing, therefore you might not know he/she
              >is deaf. If he is deaf, don't worry about it too much, it's really
              >no big deal, they get along very well without their hearing.

              I don't think he's deaf, but I'm fairly certain that he is hard of
              hearing. He's responded to high pitches in some music and he'll
              respond if you YELL! his name, but you have to be fairly close, so it
              could be movement that he's noticing. I've just taken to the habit
              of carrying around a small flashlight and flashing it at him twice
              for "No" then go get him and either hold him or redirect the behavior
              or put him in a timeout. He's a very bright boy and I don't want him
              to start thinking that opening the closet door means he gets a quick
              trip back to the food dish. He appears to simply be somewhat more
              stubborn and larger than Baker. He has the weight and leverage
              needed to get that sliding door open. I just got some hooks and eyes
              to hold the door shut with, but haven't had a chance to install them
              yet.

              --
              Karen Balle
              kballe@...
              AIM: eresh22
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