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Re: HELP!! Allergy Question

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  • DebraJean
    Hi, I have allergies to animals too but it s worse in large numbers and I run a ferret rescue. LOL A couple of things you can try to help your daughter is to
    Message 1 of 18 , Jun 30, 2009
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      Hi, I have allergies to animals too but it's worse in large numbers and I run a ferret rescue. LOL
      A couple of things you can try to help your daughter is to get a Hepa Filter vaccume cleaner if you have rugs/carpeting in your home. It doesn't have to be a big expensive one. I have a Eureka which I paid $40 for it. The trick it to vaccume your rugs, chairs and couch till nothing is being picked up in the clear canister. Once you do that, vaccume daily. It's not neccissarely the animals she's allergic to, it's their "Dander".Another thing you can do is pick up a Hepa Air purifier for each room. They have models that have forever filters meaning you wash the instead of replacing them. I have a huge unit in my downstairs and one for each bedroom.They will pick up most of the hair and dander that is floating in your home's air.
      Although I don't believe in washing your ferrets and cats unless they are extreamly dirty, there is a pet shampoo on the market, (I believe most vets sell it.) that will help cut down on animal dander.
      I have asthmatic broncitis as well as allergies, so believe me, I can sympathies with you. I don't go over a certain number of ferrets in my rescue otherwise I start to weeze and have asthma attacks.
      Thier are allergy meds out their that help with pet allergies, but I'm not sure how safe they are for children.

      Debi

      --- In AmericanFerretAssociation@yahoogroups.com, "critter1887" <lhullings_89@...> wrote:
      >
      > Any advise on dealing with allergies? My 8 year old seems to be just getting worse and worse. She is already on a prescription allergy medicine plus an otc med and allergy eye drops. We have 2 ferrets and 3 cats. She use to only have a reaction with the cats if she cuddled up with them, but then it got worse so that even if the cats layed beside her on the sofa or anything close like that and now about 5-6 months ago she started having a reaction to the ferrets which has gotten progressively worse. (My adult daughter has pet mice and the 8 year old has gotten now that when she goes over there and plays with the mice she has a reaction...I guess any little furry thing is starting to bother her).It is to the point now that if the ferret gets on her bed during the day when she goes to bed at night she has a reaction. I don't want to get rid of the ferrets, but this is just getting worse and half the time she walks around with her eyes so puffy they are almost closed. The one ferret is my daughter's and she (the ferret) knows it! In fact, she was suppose to be mine, but attached herself to my daughter almost immediately after I brought her home. The other one is mine but he likes to play with the kids and with the other ferret...on the bed! I love them both and I don't want to have to find them a new home but I can't have my child constantly suffer! PLEASE!! Any help would be greatly appreciated and PLEASE no bashing me about my thinking of rehoming them! I know that pets are a forever deal and they are part of the family...I lost my dog a year ago when she was almost 16, I lost one of my cats last Sept. at the age of 18 and I still have a 17 year old cat. I don't do the disposable pet thing...that is why I am here looking for some advise on ways to deal with this without having to rehome them! I just figured someone here had dealt with the allergy issue before and might be able to help me. Thank you!
      >
    • joclynatuo
      you ll need to keep her room spotlessly clean and it ll need to become a no-furry s zone, as well. as for the rest of the house, removing fur and dander will
      Message 2 of 18 , Jun 30, 2009
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        you'll need to keep her room spotlessly clean and it'll need to become a no-furry's zone, as well.

        as for the rest of the house, removing fur and dander will need to become a daily thing. i suggest investing in a rainbow vaccuum - it has a water resevoir instead of a bag, so, all dust and particles land in the water instead of flying through the air (the bags still let the smallest particles, like dander, out). BIG difference the very first time i used my rainbow...in fact, it was the first time i'd ever vaccuumed and didn't have sneezing fits (i am very, very allergic to dust, not just the mites that live in it).

        i'd also suggest removing all rugs from the house and go with hardwood floors or tile or laminate. dust and fur will naturally work it's way into the corners and it's easier to clean up and you can wipe the floors down daily with a moist mop and pick up the bits of dander.

        if she has reaction after touching them, there's not much you can do - washing hands/face/arms/etc really isn't going to matter since it'll be after the fact and it's actually a contact reaction rather than an issue of the trigger getting into the body via mucous membranes (rubbing eyes, eating something after petting them, etc).

        if this started with the cats, you CAN bathe them (as much as they won't like it, they'll survive). you can do that monthly and then weekly or more frequently, wipe them down with a moist towel and brush them also.

        the ferrets shouldn't really be bathed too often because the shampoo will dry their skin out and then they'll be scratching more and releasing more dander. and then there's the stink factor - more frequent shampoo baths cause their oil glands to go into overdrive and then you have the oily fur picking up dirt/dust and that'll make them smell bad. you CAN let them play in plain water weekly though, that won't bother the oil glands and will reduce dust on/in the coats as well as rinse off excess dander.

        i'd also suggest allergy shots. they take a while to get working, yes, and they're a pain in the tush. they do work, though, and are worth the hassle. if you want to keep the animals, you're going probably going to need to go this route since her allergy reactions are getting worse.

        and that's what happens. once the body is primed for it, every encounter will cause a more severe reaction. and it will continue to escalate. and it will become an 'anything furry' will cause a reaction - as you are already seeing.

        it's the same thing as with the distemper vaccine reactions in the ferrets...the first one or two shots don't cause a problem - it's anything after that that has the potential for the body to react adversely to the vaccine.

        if the issue started with the cats, then that's probably the real allergy trigger. and it's the dander mixed with the saliva that is the issue, not the fur, per se.

        certain types are more likely to cause reaction - for example, long fur types usually cause severe reaction. and there are some that are less likely to cause reaction - orange fur, is one.

        it's something to do with the genes...the long furs have more of whatever the trigger thing is and the orange furs have little/none of it.

        allergy is never something to blow off (and no, i know you're not doing that!! ). it's just that they can and do progress and they can, actually, become life threatening (if bad enough, the throat can close and then there's the fact that asthma can develop as a result as well). so, you need to hop on this now!! get an appointment with the allergist asap so that the testing can be done and then shots started.

        i'd completely skip the prick-testing and go straight for bloodwork testing - the prick tests are more generalized and the blood work tests are more specific.

        have them test for dog, cat, ferret, dust mite, rodent, bird, molds and mildew. i'd also say testing for dairy, wheat, soy and other legumes allergies would be good to do as well. i think they can even test for specific breeds of dogs and cats, too.

        another thing to test for would be related to what type of litter you use - for the cats as well as the ferrets (as well as what your daughter uses for the mice). if you use hardwood pellets, they could be the problem (and not really the animals, themselves).

        so, testing for cedar and other hardwoods that would be used in those pellets would be a good idea, too. some of the clay litters can cause reactions, too. either just from the clay itself and/or from any odor reducers that are in them.

        all the cleaning in the world and even rehoming the animals won't make a bit of difference if the allergy isn't even because of the animals...you really need to find out the specific trigger(s) and then go on accordingly once you know what the issue is.

        until you get to the allergist and get the testing done (and maybe some other meds to deal with symptoms) and get shots started, keep up with the cleaning.

        if you can't get hold of a rainbow or can't afford one join your local freecycle and post a 'wanted' request or even a 'borrow' request for one. if you can't do that, loosely wrap a moist towel around the bag of the vaccuum so that anything that blows out of it will be caught on the towel instead of being allowed to fly up into the air.

        have your daughter keep the animals away from her face and have her put an apron on or a big t-shirt before she plays with them (so that she can remove it afterward instead of having to change her clothes constantly). and she should wash her hands immediately afterwards and not touch any part of her body until she does.

        good luck!!!
      • Ronda
        Hi, It is really hard when a child is allerigic to animals, I have two that were when they were growing up. Plus I have been asthmatic for as long as I can
        Message 3 of 18 , Jun 30, 2009
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          Hi,

          It is really hard when a child is allerigic to animals, I have two that were when they were growing up. Plus I have been asthmatic for as long as I can remember, and I am now 60. If her allergies are as bad as you said, you really need to take her to a speciallist, and have her allergy tested. The shots will help her immune system build up so that she is not allergic to the pets. I had to do this and both of my boys did. You also want to be very careful about taking OTC with a Rx medication. It is very easy for her to get to were nothing works when you do this. Also as was said her bedroom should be cleaned throughly, plus she should not have carpet in her room, it holds the things that cause the allergies, her mattress should have a cover and also her pillows. The floors need to be cleaned and mopped daily, and make sure that her room is dusted very well daily.

          We did not realize that the boys had alot of food allergies, we thought it was all due to the pets we had. With the testing we found out how much they were allergic to, and it was hundereds of things. They were on the allergy shots for 2yrs, neither of them have had problems since they have been adults and they have animals, in fact my oldest has 3 dogs, goats, donkeys and birds, he has no problems being around any of them. The only allergy that has come back is to cows milk, he now drinks goats milk without any problems. He is now 40yrs old.

          My youngest has all kinds of animals and he works on a small ranch and is around all of those animals also. He has no allergies now, and he is nearly 36 now.

          If this were my daughter I would have the allery testing done. Hope this helps.






          --- In AmericanFerretAssociation@yahoogroups.com, "critter1887" <lhullings_89@...> wrote:
          >
          > Any advise on dealing with allergies? My 8 year old seems to be just getting worse and worse. She is already on a prescription allergy medicine plus an otc med and allergy eye drops. We have 2 ferrets and 3 cats. She use to only have a reaction with the cats if she cuddled up with them, but then it got worse so that even if the cats layed beside her on the sofa or anything close like that and now about 5-6 months ago she started having a reaction to the ferrets which has gotten progressively worse. (My adult daughter has pet mice and the 8 year old has gotten now that when she goes over there and plays with the mice she has a reaction...I guess any little furry thing is starting to bother her).It is to the point now that if the ferret gets on her bed during the day when she goes to bed at night she has a reaction. I don't want to get rid of the ferrets, but this is just getting worse and half the time she walks around with her eyes so puffy they are almost closed. The one ferret is my daughter's and she (the ferret) knows it! In fact, she was suppose to be mine, but attached herself to my daughter almost immediately after I brought her home. The other one is mine but he likes to play with the kids and with the other ferret...on the bed! I love them both and I don't want to have to find them a new home but I can't have my child constantly suffer! PLEASE!! Any help would be greatly appreciated and PLEASE no bashing me about my thinking of rehoming them! I know that pets are a forever deal and they are part of the family...I lost my dog a year ago when she was almost 16, I lost one of my cats last Sept. at the age of 18 and I still have a 17 year old cat. I don't do the disposable pet thing...that is why I am here looking for some advise on ways to deal with this without having to rehome them! I just figured someone here had dealt with the allergy issue before and might be able to help me. Thank you!
          >
        • Joan
          I think the issue should be addressed by seeing an allergist to pinpoint the cause(s) of her reactions.
          Message 4 of 18 , Jul 1, 2009
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            I think the issue should be addressed
            by seeing an allergist to pinpoint
            the cause(s) of her reactions.

            -- In AmericanFerretAssociation@yahoogroups.com, "critter1887" <lhullings_89@...> wrote:
            >
            > Any advise on dealing with allergies? My 8 year old seems to be just getting worse and worse. She is already on a prescription allergy medicine plus an otc med and allergy eye drops. We have 2 ferrets and 3 cats. She use to only have a reaction with the cats if she cuddled up with them, but then it got worse so that even if the cats layed beside her on the sofa or anything close like that and now about 5-6 months ago she started having a reaction to the ferrets which has gotten progressively worse. (My adult daughter has pet mice and the 8 year old has gotten now that when she goes over there and plays with the mice she has a reaction...I guess any little furry thing is starting to bother her).It is to the point now that if the ferret gets on her bed during the day when she goes to bed at night she has a reaction. I don't want to get rid of the ferrets, but this is just getting worse and half the time she walks around with her eyes so puffy they are almost closed. The one ferret is my daughter's and she (the ferret) knows it! In fact, she was suppose to be mine, but attached herself to my daughter almost immediately after I brought her home. The other one is mine but he likes to play with the kids and with the other ferret...on the bed! I love them both and I don't want to have to find them a new home but I can't have my child constantly suffer! PLEASE!! Any help would be greatly appreciated and PLEASE no bashing me about my thinking of rehoming them! I know that pets are a forever deal and they are part of the family...I lost my dog a year ago when she was almost 16, I lost one of my cats last Sept. at the age of 18 and I still have a 17 year old cat. I don't do the disposable pet thing...that is why I am here looking for some advise on ways to deal with this without having to rehome them! I just figured someone here had dealt with the allergy issue before and might be able to help me. Thank you!
            >
          • Maureen Henn
            Not sure I would bother with the Rainbow vacuum. They are such a hassle - my parents had one for years (dad wouldn t let mom buy a different one cuz that was
            Message 5 of 18 , Jul 2, 2009
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              Not sure I would bother with the Rainbow vacuum. They are such a hassle - my parents had one for years (dad wouldn't let mom buy a different one cuz that was so expensive!) and you have to change the water halfway through vacuuming if there's a lot of dirt/hair. Such a pain. And it picks up not-so-loose bits of your carpet if you're not careful.
              I also wouldn't put a towel around the bag in a regular vacuum. This could possibly cause the vacuum to overheat (starving for air) and then you'd be without one at all. I think if you just vacuum as much as you can, like 2-3 times per week at least, that will help as much as just getting her room fur-free & getting a better furnace filter.
              Maureen


              From: joclynatuo <joclyn_at_uo@...>
              To: AmericanFerretAssociation@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Tuesday, June 30, 2009 12:32:02 PM
              Subject: [AFA Ferret] Re: HELP!! Allergy Question

              you'll need to keep her room spotlessly clean and it'll need to become a no-furry's zone, as well.

              as for the rest of the house, removing fur and dander will need to become a daily thing. i suggest investing in a rainbow vaccuum - it has a water resevoir instead of a bag, so, all dust and particles land in the water instead of flying through the air (the bags still let the smallest particles, like dander, out). BIG difference the very first time i used my rainbow...in fact, it was the first time i'd ever vaccuumed and didn't have sneezing fits (i am very, very allergic to dust, not just the mites that live in it).

              i'd also suggest removing all rugs from the house and go with hardwood floors or tile or laminate. dust and fur will naturally work it's way into the corners and it's easier to clean up and you can wipe the floors down daily with a moist mop and pick up the bits of dander.

              if she has reaction after touching them, there's not much you can do - washing hands/face/arms/ etc really isn't going to matter since it'll be after the fact and it's actually a contact reaction rather than an issue of the trigger getting into the body via mucous membranes (rubbing eyes, eating something after petting them, etc).

              if this started with the cats, you CAN bathe them (as much as they won't like it, they'll survive). you can do that monthly and then weekly or more frequently, wipe them down with a moist towel and brush them also.

              the ferrets shouldn't really be bathed too often because the shampoo will dry their skin out and then they'll be scratching more and releasing more dander. and then there's the stink factor - more frequent shampoo baths cause their oil glands to go into overdrive and then you have the oily fur picking up dirt/dust and that'll make them smell bad. you CAN let them play in plain water weekly though, that won't bother the oil glands and will reduce dust on/in the coats as well as rinse off excess dander.

              i'd also suggest allergy shots. they take a while to get working, yes, and they're a pain in the tush. they do work, though, and are worth the hassle. if you want to keep the animals, you're going probably going to need to go this route since her allergy reactions are getting worse.

              and that's what happens. once the body is primed for it, every encounter will cause a more severe reaction. and it will continue to escalate. and it will become an 'anything furry' will cause a reaction - as you are already seeing.

              it's the same thing as with the distemper vaccine reactions in the ferrets...the first one or two shots don't cause a problem - it's anything after that that has the potential for the body to react adversely to the vaccine.

              if the issue started with the cats, then that's probably the real allergy trigger. and it's the dander mixed with the saliva that is the issue, not the fur, per se.

              certain types are more likely to cause reaction - for example, long fur types usually cause severe reaction. and there are some that are less likely to cause reaction - orange fur, is one.

              it's something to do with the genes...the long furs have more of whatever the trigger thing is and the orange furs have little/none of it.

              allergy is never something to blow off (and no, i know you're not doing that!! ). it's just that they can and do progress and they can, actually, become life threatening (if bad enough, the throat can close and then there's the fact that asthma can develop as a result as well). so, you need to hop on this now!! get an appointment with the allergist asap so that the testing can be done and then shots started.

              i'd completely skip the prick-testing and go straight for bloodwork testing - the prick tests are more generalized and the blood work tests are more specific.

              have them test for dog, cat, ferret, dust mite, rodent, bird, molds and mildew. i'd also say testing for dairy, wheat, soy and other legumes allergies would be good to do as well. i think they can even test for specific breeds of dogs and cats, too.

              another thing to test for would be related to what type of litter you use - for the cats as well as the ferrets (as well as what your daughter uses for the mice). if you use hardwood pellets, they could be the problem (and not really the animals, themselves).

              so, testing for cedar and other hardwoods that would be used in those pellets would be a good idea, too. some of the clay litters can cause reactions, too. either just from the clay itself and/or from any odor reducers that are in them.

              all the cleaning in the world and even rehoming the animals won't make a bit of difference if the allergy isn't even because of the animals...you really need to find out the specific trigger(s) and then go on accordingly once you know what the issue is.

              until you get to the allergist and get the testing done (and maybe some other meds to deal with symptoms) and get shots started, keep up with the cleaning.

              if you can't get hold of a rainbow or can't afford one join your local freecycle and post a 'wanted' request or even a 'borrow' request for one. if you can't do that, loosely wrap a moist towel around the bag of the vaccuum so that anything that blows out of it will be caught on the towel instead of being allowed to fly up into the air.

              have your daughter keep the animals away from her face and have her put an apron on or a big t-shirt before she plays with them (so that she can remove it afterward instead of having to change her clothes constantly). and she should wash her hands immediately afterwards and not touch any part of her body until she does.

              good luck!!!

            • ferretmom23
              I agree. If her allergies are this bad, and sounds like they are getting worse fairly quickly, she will only get worse without treatment. My husband s
              Message 6 of 18 , Jul 2, 2009
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                I agree. If her allergies are this bad, and sounds like they are getting worse fairly quickly, she will only get worse without treatment. My husband's allergies to cats got so bad he developed asthma. The doctor said that once he had developed asthma he would always have asthma. That was 20 years ago and he still has asthma. This was before we had ferrets. You'll need to tell the allergist you own ferrets because there is no test for ferret allergies like there are for dogs and cats, but a good allergist can make a test from some fur you can supply. ferretmomCindy


                --- In AmericanFerretAssociation@yahoogroups.com, "Joan" <jevanci1@...> wrote:
                >
                > I think the issue should be addressed
                > by seeing an allergist to pinpoint
                > the cause(s) of her reactions.

                [Extra quoting deleted by moderator. --Dav]
              • joclyn atuo
                the blood test for allergies can be specified to test for ferret allergy. joclyn To: AmericanFerretAssociation@yahoogroups.com From: ferretmom23@yahoo.com
                Message 7 of 18 , Jul 3, 2009
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                  the blood test for allergies can be specified to test for ferret allergy.

                  joclyn





                  To: AmericanFerretAssociation@yahoogroups.com
                  From: ferretmom23@...
                  Date: Fri, 3 Jul 2009 01:42:28 +0000
                  Subject: [AFA Ferret] Re: HELP!! Allergy Question







                  I agree. If her allergies are this bad, and sounds like they are getting worse fairly quickly, she will only get worse without treatment. My husband's allergies to cats got so bad he developed asthma. The doctor said that once he had developed asthma he would always have asthma. That was 20 years ago and he still has asthma. This was before we had ferrets. You'll need to tell the allergist you own ferrets because there is no test for ferret allergies like there are for dogs and cats, but a good allergist can make a test from some fur you can supply. ferretmomCindy

                  [Extra quoting deleted by moderator. --Dav]
                • ferretmom23
                  That s great that the companies that offer the testing kits have started to include ferrets. Do you happen to know the name of the company that offers this
                  Message 8 of 18 , Jul 3, 2009
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                    That's great that the companies that offer the testing kits have started to include ferrets. Do you happen to know the name of the company that offers this kit? ferretmomCindy




                    --- In AmericanFerretAssociation@yahoogroups.com, joclyn atuo <joclyn_at_uo@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > the blood test for allergies can be specified to test for ferret allergy.
                    >
                    > joclyn

                    [Extra quoting deleted by moderator. --Dav]
                  • ferretmom23
                    I was looking at your message, again, and saw that it said blood test. The blood test is expensive and the vet can make up a skin test from hair, nail
                    Message 9 of 18 , Jul 4, 2009
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                      I was looking at your message, again, and saw that it said blood test. The blood test is expensive and the vet can make up a skin test from hair, nail clippings, etc. to do with the skin test kit. ferretmomCindy



                      --- In AmericanFerretAssociation@yahoogroups.com, joclyn atuo <joclyn_at_uo@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > the blood test for allergies can be specified to test for ferret allergy.
                      >
                      > joclyn

                      [Extra quoting deleted by moderator. --Dav]
                    • joclyn atuo
                      i d think it would be a standard option to choose when the doc pulls the blood to send it to the lab. i ve never done a kit for testing...always went to
                      Message 10 of 18 , Jul 4, 2009
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                        i'd think it would be a standard option to choose when the doc pulls the blood to send it to the lab. i've never done a 'kit' for testing...always went to either the allergist or the ear/nose/throat doc and they pulled blood and sent it to the lab.

                        joclyn





                        To: AmericanFerretAssociation@yahoogroups.com
                        From: ferretmom23@...
                        Date: Fri, 3 Jul 2009 22:38:49 +0000
                        Subject: [AFA Ferret] Re: HELP!! Allergy Question


                        That's great that the companies that offer the testing kits have started to include ferrets. Do you happen to know the name of the company that offers this kit? ferretmomCindy

                        [Extra quoting deleted by moderator. --Dav]
                      • joclyn atuo
                        the skin tests are still done at the doc s office - they re not something that can be done at home. they re also more generalized than the blood tests. with
                        Message 11 of 18 , Jul 5, 2009
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                          the skin tests are still done at the doc's office - they're not something that can be done at home.  they're also more generalized than the blood tests.
                           
                          with the prick tests, for example, they'll do one for 'tree pollen'; dog dander'; 'flower pollen'; 'grass pollen'; etc.  those give an idea what group(s) of items are an issue. 
                           
                          the blood tests will be for specific varieties within the groups.  for example, maple or oak, dog breed, specific flower family and grass family, etc.
                           
                          just because someone has an allergy to a group of triggers doesn't mean that everything in that group will be an issue. 
                           
                          for example, i was told by the allergist (just did the prick tests) that i was allergic to grasses, cats, dogs and trees.  years later, when i went to the ent, she did the prick tests and then did blood tests to get more specific info. 
                           
                          so, i found out that maple tree pollen is a particular issue and oak is a bit and all the rest aren't.  similar results for cats - angora types i'm very sensitive to and most of the short-hairs (mutt types) i'm not.  and again with different dog breeds (i don't remember whish weren't an issue, since i'm not a dog person. although, from experience with friends dogs, huskies are an issue for me) and i was given more specific info about flowers and grasses (which was of great help when i bought a house and wanted to plant gardens).
                           
                          cost of the test shouldn't be an issue.  the info provided can truly be a life saver and there's no price on that!! 
                           
                          i had no idea that anyone could be allergic to mildews, for example.  nor trees...and trees can be an issue not just during the time they're giving off pollen...burning the wood in a fireplace could be an issue if the person is sensitive enough to it (and the wood isn't cured completely) and wood chips that are sometimes used in playgrounds can also be an issue for kids with a sensitivity.
                           
                          never knew different breeds of dogs wouldn't be an issue for me either.  we didn't have a dog growing up, so i didn't have to much exposure to any until i was a teen...the golden didn't bother me, yet the collie i had severe reaction to.  they did specifics for dogs on the bloodtest even though i don't have a dog and probably never will...if i ever want to get one, i know which to avoid.  and because i do know which are an issue, when visiting friends that have or get those kinds, i can prepare ahead of time with extra meds to compensate for symptoms.
                           
                          having the extra detail that the blood tests provided will also avoid animals being brought to shelters because 'our child is allergic' because they may not actually be allergic to the animal...could be something else that's causing the issues and the animal is just making the symptoms worse.  and that happens because, once the system is sensitized, everything - even if only a slight trigger - will be enhanced...in other words, the body goes into overdrive and reacts to everything even if it wouldn't normally.
                           
                          joclyn


                           

                          .



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                        • ferretmom23
                          Actually there are home test kits available online(I ve never used them). These are not to what I was referring. The Dr s. office usually uses company-made
                          Message 12 of 18 , Jul 6, 2009
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                            Actually there are home test kits available online(I've never used them). These are not to what I was referring. The Dr's. office usually uses company-made alllery test kits approved by the FDA. Those do not include tests for ferrets, hedgehogs, etc. The skin-test kit is where the Dr. likes to begin. In the past, insurance will usually only pay for an Allergin Speciic IgE test if a skin test is not possible for extreme health reasons(ecezema). The test you are referring to is a Standard IgE and is available at the Dr's. office as a blood test and will give an overall IgE(how the body is reacting overall to all/any allergins not to a specific allergin). For a specific allergin you need an Allergin Specific IgE test where a specific allergin is added to a test tube of blood and that IgE level is measured. It must be done for each allergin you suspect and is therefore extremely expensive. Again, insurance will usually not pay for these type of tests except in extreme circumstances. If the family in question is like me(money is tight)it is something she needs to be aware of before requesting a specific type of testing at the Dr's. office or she could end up with a staggering bill. ferretmomCindy



                            --- In AmericanFerretAssociation@yahoogroups.com, joclyn atuo <joclyn_at_uo@...> wrote:
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > the skin tests are still done at the doc's office - they're not something that can be done at home. they're also more generalized than the blood tests.
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > with the prick tests, for example, they'll do one for 'tree pollen'; dog dander'; 'flower pollen'; 'grass pollen'; etc. those give an idea what group(s) of items are an issue.
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > the blood tests will be for specific varieties within the groups. for example, maple or oak, dog breed, specific flower family and grass family, etc.
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > just because someone has an allergy to a group of triggers doesn't mean that everything in that group will be an issue.
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > for example, i was told by the allergist (just did the prick tests) that i was allergic to grasses, cats, dogs and trees. years later, when i went to the ent, she did the prick tests and then did blood tests to get more specific info.
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > so, i found out that maple tree pollen is a particular issue and oak is a bit and all the rest aren't. similar results for cats - angora types i'm very sensitive to and most of the short-hairs (mutt types) i'm not. and again with different dog breeds (i don't remember whish weren't an issue, since i'm not a dog person. although, from experience with friends dogs, huskies are an issue for me) and i was given more specific info about flowers and grasses (which was of great help when i bought a house and wanted to plant gardens).
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > cost of the test shouldn't be an issue. the info provided can truly be a life saver and there's no price on that!!
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > i had no idea that anyone could be allergic to mildews, for example. nor trees...and trees can be an issue not just during the time they're giving off pollen...burning the wood in a fireplace could be an issue if the person is sensitive enough to it (and the wood isn't cured completely) and wood chips that are sometimes used in playgrounds can also be an issue for kids with a sensitivity.
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > never knew different breeds of dogs wouldn't be an issue for me either. we didn't have a dog growing up, so i didn't have to much exposure to any until i was a teen...the golden didn't bother me, yet the collie i had severe reaction to. they did specifics for dogs on the bloodtest even though i don't have a dog and probably never will...if i ever want to get one, i know which to avoid. and because i do know which are an issue, when visiting friends that have or get those kinds, i can prepare ahead of time with extra meds to compensate for symptoms.
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > having the extra detail that the blood tests provided will also avoid animals being brought to shelters because 'our child is allergic' because they may not actually be allergic to the animal...could be something else that's causing the issues and the animal is just making the symptoms worse. and that happens because, once the system is sensitized, everything - even if only a slight trigger - will be enhanced...in other words, the body goes into overdrive and reacts to everything even if it wouldn't normally.
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > joclyn
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > .
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > _________________________________________________________________
                            > Windows Live™ SkyDrive™: Get 25 GB of free online storage.
                            > http://windowslive.com/online/skydrive?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_SD_25GB_062009
                            >
                          • ferretmom23
                            Jocelyn, your SPT kit didn t include specific trees, grasses, etc. Mine did. I was found allergic to oak, pecan, grasses(except red creeping sedum)but not
                            Message 13 of 18 , Jul 6, 2009
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Jocelyn, your SPT kit didn't include specific trees, grasses, etc. Mine did. I was found allergic to oak, pecan, grasses(except red creeping sedum)but not weeds, molds, and other stuff. I also tested allergic to silk, but I'm not. I wear silk with no problems at all. Go figure. LOL ferretmomCindy


                              --- In AmericanFerretAssociation@yahoogroups.com, joclyn atuo <joclyn_at_uo@...> wrote:
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > the skin tests are still done at the doc's office - they're not something that can be done at home. they're also more generalized than the blood tests.
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > with the prick tests, for example, they'll do one for 'tree pollen'; dog dander'; 'flower pollen'; 'grass pollen'; etc. those give an idea what group(s) of items are an issue.
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > the blood tests will be for specific varieties within the groups. for example, maple or oak, dog breed, specific flower family and grass family, etc.
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > just because someone has an allergy to a group of triggers doesn't mean that everything in that group will be an issue.
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > for example, i was told by the allergist (just did the prick tests) that i was allergic to grasses, cats, dogs and trees. years later, when i went to the ent, she did the prick tests and then did blood tests to get more specific info.
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > so, i found out that maple tree pollen is a particular issue and oak is a bit and all the rest aren't. similar results for cats - angora types i'm very sensitive to and most of the short-hairs (mutt types) i'm not. and again with different dog breeds (i don't remember whish weren't an issue, since i'm not a dog person. although, from experience with friends dogs, huskies are an issue for me) and i was given more specific info about flowers and grasses (which was of great help when i bought a house and wanted to plant gardens).
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > cost of the test shouldn't be an issue. the info provided can truly be a life saver and there's no price on that!!
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > i had no idea that anyone could be allergic to mildews, for example. nor trees...and trees can be an issue not just during the time they're giving off pollen...burning the wood in a fireplace could be an issue if the person is sensitive enough to it (and the wood isn't cured completely) and wood chips that are sometimes used in playgrounds can also be an issue for kids with a sensitivity.
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > never knew different breeds of dogs wouldn't be an issue for me either. we didn't have a dog growing up, so i didn't have to much exposure to any until i was a teen...the golden didn't bother me, yet the collie i had severe reaction to. they did specifics for dogs on the bloodtest even though i don't have a dog and probably never will...if i ever want to get one, i know which to avoid. and because i do know which are an issue, when visiting friends that have or get those kinds, i can prepare ahead of time with extra meds to compensate for symptoms.
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > having the extra detail that the blood tests provided will also avoid animals being brought to shelters because 'our child is allergic' because they may not actually be allergic to the animal...could be something else that's causing the issues and the animal is just making the symptoms worse. and that happens because, once the system is sensitized, everything - even if only a slight trigger - will be enhanced...in other words, the body goes into overdrive and reacts to everything even if it wouldn't normally.
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > joclyn
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > .
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > _________________________________________________________________
                              > Windows Live™ SkyDrive™: Get 25 GB of free online storage.
                              > http://windowslive.com/online/skydrive?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_SD_25GB_062009
                              >
                            • ferretmom23
                              Jocelyn, if you got your insurance to pay for RAST testing, you ve got some GOOD insurance and I want it! LOL ferretmomCindy
                              Message 14 of 18 , Jul 6, 2009
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Jocelyn, if you got your insurance to pay for RAST testing, you've got some GOOD insurance and I want it! LOL ferretmomCindy



                                --- In AmericanFerretAssociation@yahoogroups.com, joclyn atuo <joclyn_at_uo@...> wrote:
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > the skin tests are still done at the doc's office - they're not something that can be done at home. they're also more generalized than the blood tests.
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > with the prick tests, for example, they'll do one for 'tree pollen'; dog dander'; 'flower pollen'; 'grass pollen'; etc. those give an idea what group(s) of items are an issue.
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > the blood tests will be for specific varieties within the groups. for example, maple or oak, dog breed, specific flower family and grass family, etc.
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > just because someone has an allergy to a group of triggers doesn't mean that everything in that group will be an issue.
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > for example, i was told by the allergist (just did the prick tests) that i was allergic to grasses, cats, dogs and trees. years later, when i went to the ent, she did the prick tests and then did blood tests to get more specific info.
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > so, i found out that maple tree pollen is a particular issue and oak is a bit and all the rest aren't. similar results for cats - angora types i'm very sensitive to and most of the short-hairs (mutt types) i'm not. and again with different dog breeds (i don't remember whish weren't an issue, since i'm not a dog person. although, from experience with friends dogs, huskies are an issue for me) and i was given more specific info about flowers and grasses (which was of great help when i bought a house and wanted to plant gardens).
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > cost of the test shouldn't be an issue. the info provided can truly be a life saver and there's no price on that!!
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > i had no idea that anyone could be allergic to mildews, for example. nor trees...and trees can be an issue not just during the time they're giving off pollen...burning the wood in a fireplace could be an issue if the person is sensitive enough to it (and the wood isn't cured completely) and wood chips that are sometimes used in playgrounds can also be an issue for kids with a sensitivity.
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > never knew different breeds of dogs wouldn't be an issue for me either. we didn't have a dog growing up, so i didn't have to much exposure to any until i was a teen...the golden didn't bother me, yet the collie i had severe reaction to. they did specifics for dogs on the bloodtest even though i don't have a dog and probably never will...if i ever want to get one, i know which to avoid. and because i do know which are an issue, when visiting friends that have or get those kinds, i can prepare ahead of time with extra meds to compensate for symptoms.
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > having the extra detail that the blood tests provided will also avoid animals being brought to shelters because 'our child is allergic' because they may not actually be allergic to the animal...could be something else that's causing the issues and the animal is just making the symptoms worse. and that happens because, once the system is sensitized, everything - even if only a slight trigger - will be enhanced...in other words, the body goes into overdrive and reacts to everything even if it wouldn't normally.
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > joclyn
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > .
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > _________________________________________________________________
                                > Windows Live™ SkyDrive™: Get 25 GB of free online storage.
                                > http://windowslive.com/online/skydrive?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_SD_25GB_062009
                                >
                              • joclyn atuo
                                i didn t use any kind of kit. i went to the allergist and then an ent and they did the prick tests and the ent went a step further and did bloodwork to get
                                Message 15 of 18 , Jul 7, 2009
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  i didn't use any kind of kit. i went to the allergist and then an ent and they did the prick tests and the ent went a step further and did bloodwork to get more specific info about the groups i'd had reaction to on the prick test.



                                  when the bloodwork was done, it was about 5-6 years ago. and, yes, completely covered by my medical at the time.



                                  would still be covered today since the plan has never been modified and/or updated over the years. (and, boy, will i miss it when it when it's gone cause there are no deductibles and any co-pays are minimal).

                                  joclyn





                                  To: AmericanFerretAssociation@yahoogroups.com
                                  From: ferretmom23@...
                                  Date: Tue, 7 Jul 2009 02:07:00 +0000
                                  Subject: [AFA Ferret] Re: HELP!! Allergy Question







                                  Jocelyn, your SPT kit didn't include specific trees, grasses, etc. Mine did. I was found allergic to oak, pecan, grasses(except red creeping sedum)but not weeds, molds, and other stuff. I also tested allergic to silk, but I'm not. I wear silk with no problems at all. Go figure. LOL ferretmomCindy

                                  [Extra quoting deleted by moderator. --Dav]
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