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Re: U.S. voters are split along religious lines

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  • cricket_38119
    I know this article wasn t meant to be funny, but I had to chuckle a few ti= mes at some of the report. Dean stopped going to church when he had a dispu= te
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 1, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      I know this article wasn't meant to be funny, but I had to chuckle a few ti=
      mes at some of the report. Dean stopped going to church when he had a dispu=
      te with the church over a bike path. "Oh ye of little faith"...LOL~!! The =
      other shallow candidates (with the exception of Sen. Lieberman) don't attend=
      church unless it is a Black church -- with good band music - during a camp=
      aign.

      Many people still confuse religiosity with spiritual. Lots of church member=
      s go to church religiously but have no personal relationship with their Heae=
      nly Father; G0d is as distant to them and their lives as a fence post. One =
      thing Christians know about each other is they can NOT stop a Christian from=
      talking about the most important person in their lives, and that person is:=
      G0d and his Son, Jesus Christ, and the power of the the Holy Spirit as He w=
      orks in their lives.

      Fully conscious and educated people haven't needed Pew Research to tell us =
      what we already know. We already know, for instance: If a person SUPPORTS =
      and BELIEVES in:

      (1) Infanticide [killing babies as they are being born] and Late-Term Abor=
      tion; (2) "If it feels good, do it"; (3) Hates the military and money spent =
      on national defense; (4) the government should furnish the necessities of l=
      ife and living off the largesse of taxpayers indefinitely; (5) the propagand=
      a of seuclar humanism; (6) the propaganda of cultural relativism: (7) Appeas=
      ing, accommodating, placating thugs, dictators, and terrorists that make no =
      bones about wanting to kill us; (8) lying, cheating, and stealing, and putti=
      ng Party ahead of country; then THEY WILL FIND A PERFECT HOME IN THE DEMONC=
      RATIC PARTY.

      All those like-minded individuals will be voting dem in the next election.
      That's the difference between radical, left-wing liberals and dems and mode=
      rate to conservative Independents and Republicans. If a person is a believi=
      ng Christian they cannot in good conscious NOR will they vote for anyone run=
      ning on a dem PLATFORM that Supports the murder of innocent babies as they a=
      re being born. That is the continued PLATFORM of the Dem party -- and it has=
      not changed one iota - and NO Christian would vote for any candidate that s=
      upports the dem PLATFORM. IF they do they have already compromised enough i=
      n their lives that they have no conscience remaining to guide them.

      If Lieberman was not running on a dim Platform I could support him. But he =
      has compromised any integrity he might have had with me.
      <cr>
      ###

      --- In American-politics@yahoogroups.com, lefty480@w... wrote:
      > U.S. voters are split along religious lines
      > By Steven Thomma
      > Knight Ridder Newspapers
      >       DES MOINES, Iowa — Want to know how Americans will vote
      > next Election Day? Watch what they do the weekend before.
      >       If they attend religious services regularly, they probably
      > will vote Republican by a 2-1 margin. If they never go, they likely will
      > vote Democratic by a 2-1 margin.
      >       This relatively new fault line in American life is a major
      > reason the country is politically polarized. And the division is likely
      > to continue or even grow in 2004.
      >       A new poll by the nonpartisan Pew Research Center For The
      > People & The Press this fall confirmed that the gap remains; voters who
      > frequently attend religious services tilt 63-37 percent to Bush, and
      > those who never attend lean 62-38 percent toward Democrats.
      >       "We now have the widest gap we have ever had between
      > Republicans and Democrats," said Andy Kohut, the director of the Pew
      > survey.
      >       "It's THE most powerful predictor of party ID and partisan
      > voting intention," said Thomas Mann, a political scholar at the
      > Brookings Institution, a center-left Washington research center. "And in
      > a society that values religion as much as (this one), when there are
      > high levels of religious belief and commitment and practice, that's
      > significant."
      >       President Bush is a churchgoing Christian who often mixes
      > theology with public policies ranging from the war on terrorism to a ban
      > on a specific type of late-term abortion. By contrast, most leading
      > Democratic candidates for president keep their campaigns secular, seldom
      > mentioning God, religion or attending church, except for the occasional
      > well-publicized visit to an African-American church.
      >       The most notable exception among top-tier candidates is Sen.
      > Joseph Lieberman of Connecticut, a Jew who frequently invokes God, casts
      > policy issues in moral terms and refuses to campaign on the Sabbath.
      >       The Rev. Al Sharpton is religious too, of course, but polls
      > show he's favored by fewer than 1 percent of likely Democratic voters in
      > New Hampshire, the first primary state.
      >       In contrast, the front-runner for the Democratic nomination,
      > former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean, said recently that he prayed privately
      > but quit being an Episcopalian in a dispute with his parish over a bike
      > path. He recently linked God with guns and gays in a list of issues that
      > shouldn't influence voting. Dean doesn't regularly attend church, nor do
      > most of his chief rivals.
      >       It wasn't always so. Most Democratic candidates through the
      > 20th century were openly religious. Born-again Christian Jimmy Carter
      > ran in 1976 as much a moral messenger ("I will never lie to you") as a
      > champion of the Democratic policy agenda. Bill Clinton could quote the
      > Bible as readily as the party platform. The one exception: John F.
      > Kennedy played down his Roman Catholic faith in 1960, when anti-Catholic
      > bias was still common.
      >       Voters weren't split by the frequency of their visits to
      > church, synagogue or mosque until recently. The gap started growing in
      > the 1990s and became clear in the 2000 election between Bush and
      > Democrat Al Gore. Voters who attended religious services more than once
      > a week went for Bush by a margin of nearly 2-1.
      >       Those who never went to services went for Gore by the same
      > margin.
      >       The schism began as a countermovement to the culture wars of
      > the 1960s. By the late 1970s, conservative Democrats, notably
      > evangelical Christians in the South and ethnic Catholics in the North,
      > found many of their values under assault, particularly in regard to
      > legalized abortion and gay rights, according to Dennis Goldford, a
      > political scientist who teaches a course in religion and politics at
      > Drake University in Iowa.
      >       Many disaffected voters became Republicans, who cast their
      > party as the champion of conservative religious values with the help of
      > the Rev. Jerry Falwell's Moral Majority and the Rev. Pat Robertson's
      > Christian Coalition.
      >       Democrats reacted by pulling away from public discussion of
      > religion.
      >       "Liberals thought the ayatollahs were taking over the
      > country," Goldford said. "The Democrats haven't figured out how to talk
      > about it. Many just aren't comfortable with the talk of God."
      >       Democratic strategist Donna Brazile, who managed Gore's 2000
      > campaign, recalled recently that she felt uncomfortable even mentioning
      > her religion while working in the 1988 presidential campaign of Michael
      > Dukakis. "I couldn't talk about my faith," she said, adding that she
      > thought the party got better under Clinton and Gore.
      >       "It is a problem," said Dick Harpootlian, a Democratic
      > strategist and former state party chairman in South Carolina. He said
      > Democrats should be more comfortable talking about religion,
      > particularly as it relates to principles such as tolerance and helping
      > the poor and weak.
      >       "Democrats have a much more Christian, religiously friendly
      > message," he said. "But if you go to a Democratic meeting, they don't
      > open it with a prayer."
      >       The biggest exception among Democrats is African-Americans.
      > They tend to be religious and regular churchgoers. Democratic candidates
      > frequently attend African-American churches to appeal for support.
      >       While in Detroit to attend a nationally televised debate on
      > a recent Sunday, for example, most Democratic candidates spent the
      > morning in black churches. Pumped up by a backdrop of drums, music,
      > singing and dancing, Dean told the congregation at one church, "It's
      > going to be a long time before I go to a white church again."
      >       Indeed, Dean isn't a regular churchgoer. Baptized Catholic,
      > he later became an Episcopalian. He quit that denomination because he
      > had what he called "a big fight" with a Vermont Episcopal church over
      > plans for a bike path on church-controlled property. He became a
      > Congregationalist, but said recently that he didn't attend church very
      > often.
      >       On a recent visit to Tallahassee, Fla., Dean all but lumped
      > God with other divisive social issues. "We have got to stop having our
      > elections in the South based on race, guns, God and gays," he said, "and
      > start having them based on jobs and health insurance and a foreign
      > policy that's consistent with American values."
      >       Dean isn't alone among major Democratic contenders who're
      > rarely seen at church.
      >       Sen. John Kerry of Massachusetts occasionally attends
      > Catholic Mass, but is "very private about his religion," said aide David
      > Wade. "If he's in someplace like Davenport or Dubuque, with a big
      > Catholic community, he'll go to church."
      >       Rep. Dick Gephardt of Missouri, another major contender,
      > mentions when campaigning that he had a Baptist church scholarship for
      > college. But he doesn't mention God or religion beyond that. "He is a
      > religious person," said aide Erik Smith. "He does not regularly go to
      > church."
      >       Smith conceded the political challenge. "Republican
      > candidates," he said, "have been talking to those who worship regularly
      > in a language they can relate to. Too often, Democrats speak a more
      > secular language that they're unable to relate to."
      >       Retired Gen. Wesley Clark's father was Jewish, but Clark was
      > raised first as a Methodist, then as a Baptist, converted to Catholicism
      > as a young adult and now attends the Presbyterian Church. "I'm
      > spiritual. I'm religious. I'm a strong Christian and I'm a Catholic, but
      > I go to Presbyterian Church," Clark said in an interview this week being
      > circulated by his campaign.
      >       Lieberman, who does speak the language of faith and
      > religion, said his party should set aside its aversion to religion and
      > embrace it as a message harmonious with its core principles. But he
      > insisted that any such stance must be born of principal, not politics.
      >       "I didn't become religious because of a focus group," he
      > said. "I have a sense of mission. Republicans act as if they have a
      > monopoly on values or faith-based values. They don't."
      > U.S. voters are
      > split along religious lines By Steven ThommaKnight Ridder Newspaper
      > s       DES
      > MOINES, Iowa — Want
      > to know how Americans will vote next Election Day? Wa
      > tch what they do the weekend
      >
      >
      > http://www.deseretnews.com/dn/view/0,1249,565035471,00.html
    • Murdock
      What was that crashing noise? Did someone cast the first stone? ... a few ti= ... had a dispu= ... faith ...LOL~!! The = ... don t attend= ... during a camp=
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 1, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        What was that crashing noise? Did someone cast the first stone?

        --- In American-politics@yahoogroups.com, "cricket_38119"
        <cricket_38119@y...> wrote:
        > I know this article wasn't meant to be funny, but I had to chuckle
        a few ti=
        > mes at some of the report. Dean stopped going to church when he
        had a dispu=
        > te with the church over a bike path. "Oh ye of little
        faith"...LOL~!! The =
        > other shallow candidates (with the exception of Sen. Lieberman)
        don't attend=
        > church unless it is a Black church -- with good band music -
        during a camp=
        > aign.
        >
        > Many people still confuse religiosity with spiritual. Lots of
        church member=
        > s go to church religiously but have no personal relationship with
        their Heae=
        > nly Father; G0d is as distant to them and their lives as a fence
        post. One =
        > thing Christians know about each other is they can NOT stop a
        Christian from=
        > talking about the most important person in their lives, and that
        person is:=
        > G0d and his Son, Jesus Christ, and the power of the the Holy
        Spirit as He w=
        > orks in their lives.
        >
        > Fully conscious and educated people haven't needed Pew Research to
        tell us =
        > what we already know. We already know, for instance: If a person
        SUPPORTS =
        > and BELIEVES in:
        >
        > (1) Infanticide [killing babies as they are being born] and Late-
        Term Abor=
        > tion; (2) "If it feels good, do it"; (3) Hates the military and
        money spent =
        > on national defense; (4) the government should furnish the
        necessities of l=
        > ife and living off the largesse of taxpayers indefinitely; (5) the
        propagand=
        > a of seuclar humanism; (6) the propaganda of cultural relativism:
        (7) Appeas=
        > ing, accommodating, placating thugs, dictators, and terrorists
        that make no =
        > bones about wanting to kill us; (8) lying, cheating, and stealing,
        and putti=
        > ng Party ahead of country; then THEY WILL FIND A PERFECT HOME IN
        THE DEMONC=
        > RATIC PARTY.
        >
        > All those like-minded individuals will be voting dem in the next
        election.
        > That's the difference between radical, left-wing liberals and dems
        and mode=
        > rate to conservative Independents and Republicans. If a person is
        a believi=
        > ng Christian they cannot in good conscious NOR will they vote for
        anyone run=
        > ning on a dem PLATFORM that Supports the murder of innocent babies
        as they a=
        > re being born. That is the continued PLATFORM of the Dem party --
        and it has=
        > not changed one iota - and NO Christian would vote for any
        candidate that s=
        > upports the dem PLATFORM. IF they do they have already
        compromised enough i=
        > n their lives that they have no conscience remaining to guide them.
        >
        > If Lieberman was not running on a dim Platform I could support
        him. But he =
        > has compromised any integrity he might have had with me.
        > <cr>
        > ###
        >
        > --- In American-politics@yahoogroups.com, lefty480@w... wrote:
        > > U.S. voters are split along religious lines
        > > By Steven Thomma
        > > Knight Ridder Newspapers
        > >       DES MOINES, Iowa — Want to know how Americans will vote
        > > next Election Day? Watch what they do the weekend before.
        > >       If they attend religious services regularly, they probably
        > > will vote Republican by a 2-1 margin. If they never go, they
        likely will
        > > vote Democratic by a 2-1 margin.
        > >       This relatively new fault line in American life is a major
        > > reason the country is politically polarized. And the division is
        likely
        > > to continue or even grow in 2004.
        > >       A new poll by the nonpartisan Pew Research Center For The
        > > People & The Press this fall confirmed that the gap remains;
        voters who
        > > frequently attend religious services tilt 63-37 percent to Bush,
        and
        > > those who never attend lean 62-38 percent toward Democrats.
        > >       "We now have the widest gap we have ever had between
        > > Republicans and Democrats," said Andy Kohut, the director of the
        Pew
        > > survey.
        > >       "It's THE most powerful predictor of party ID and partisan
        > > voting intention," said Thomas Mann, a political scholar at the
        > > Brookings Institution, a center-left Washington research
        center. "And in
        > > a society that values religion as much as (this one), when there
        are
        > > high levels of religious belief and commitment and practice,
        that's
        > > significant."
        > >       President Bush is a churchgoing Christian who often mixes
        > > theology with public policies ranging from the war on terrorism
        to a ban
        > > on a specific type of late-term abortion. By contrast, most
        leading
        > > Democratic candidates for president keep their campaigns
        secular, seldom
        > > mentioning God, religion or attending church, except for the
        occasional
        > > well-publicized visit to an African-American church.
        > >       The most notable exception among top-tier candidates is
        Sen.
        > > Joseph Lieberman of Connecticut, a Jew who frequently invokes
        God, casts
        > > policy issues in moral terms and refuses to campaign on the
        Sabbath.
        > >       The Rev. Al Sharpton is religious too, of course, but polls
        > > show he's favored by fewer than 1 percent of likely Democratic
        voters in
        > > New Hampshire, the first primary state.
        > >       In contrast, the front-runner for the Democratic
        nomination,
        > > former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean, said recently that he prayed
        privately
        > > but quit being an Episcopalian in a dispute with his parish over
        a bike
        > > path. He recently linked God with guns and gays in a list of
        issues that
        > > shouldn't influence voting. Dean doesn't regularly attend
        church, nor do
        > > most of his chief rivals.
        > >       It wasn't always so. Most Democratic candidates through the
        > > 20th century were openly religious. Born-again Christian Jimmy
        Carter
        > > ran in 1976 as much a moral messenger ("I will never lie to
        you") as a
        > > champion of the Democratic policy agenda. Bill Clinton could
        quote the
        > > Bible as readily as the party platform. The one exception: John
        F.
        > > Kennedy played down his Roman Catholic faith in 1960, when anti-
        Catholic
        > > bias was still common.
        > >       Voters weren't split by the frequency of their visits to
        > > church, synagogue or mosque until recently. The gap started
        growing in
        > > the 1990s and became clear in the 2000 election between Bush and
        > > Democrat Al Gore. Voters who attended religious services more
        than once
        > > a week went for Bush by a margin of nearly 2-1.
        > >       Those who never went to services went for Gore by the same
        > > margin.
        > >       The schism began as a countermovement to the culture wars
        of
        > > the 1960s. By the late 1970s, conservative Democrats, notably
        > > evangelical Christians in the South and ethnic Catholics in the
        North,
        > > found many of their values under assault, particularly in regard
        to
        > > legalized abortion and gay rights, according to Dennis Goldford,
        a
        > > political scientist who teaches a course in religion and
        politics at
        > > Drake University in Iowa.
        > >       Many disaffected voters became Republicans, who cast their
        > > party as the champion of conservative religious values with the
        help of
        > > the Rev. Jerry Falwell's Moral Majority and the Rev. Pat
        Robertson's
        > > Christian Coalition.
        > >       Democrats reacted by pulling away from public discussion of
        > > religion.
        > >       "Liberals thought the ayatollahs were taking over the
        > > country," Goldford said. "The Democrats haven't figured out how
        to talk
        > > about it. Many just aren't comfortable with the talk of God."
        > >       Democratic strategist Donna Brazile, who managed Gore's
        2000
        > > campaign, recalled recently that she felt uncomfortable even
        mentioning
        > > her religion while working in the 1988 presidential campaign of
        Michael
        > > Dukakis. "I couldn't talk about my faith," she said, adding that
        she
        > > thought the party got better under Clinton and Gore.
        > >       "It is a problem," said Dick Harpootlian, a Democratic
        > > strategist and former state party chairman in South Carolina. He
        said
        > > Democrats should be more comfortable talking about religion,
        > > particularly as it relates to principles such as tolerance and
        helping
        > > the poor and weak.
        > >       "Democrats have a much more Christian, religiously friendly
        > > message," he said. "But if you go to a Democratic meeting, they
        don't
        > > open it with a prayer."
        > >       The biggest exception among Democrats is African-Americans.
        > > They tend to be religious and regular churchgoers. Democratic
        candidates
        > > frequently attend African-American churches to appeal for
        support.
        > >       While in Detroit to attend a nationally televised debate on
        > > a recent Sunday, for example, most Democratic candidates spent
        the
        > > morning in black churches. Pumped up by a backdrop of drums,
        music,
        > > singing and dancing, Dean told the congregation at one
        church, "It's
        > > going to be a long time before I go to a white church again."
        > >       Indeed, Dean isn't a regular churchgoer. Baptized Catholic,
        > > he later became an Episcopalian. He quit that denomination
        because he
        > > had what he called "a big fight" with a Vermont Episcopal church
        over
        > > plans for a bike path on church-controlled property. He became a
        > > Congregationalist, but said recently that he didn't attend
        church very
        > > often.
        > >       On a recent visit to Tallahassee, Fla., Dean all but lumped
        > > God with other divisive social issues. "We have got to stop
        having our
        > > elections in the South based on race, guns, God and gays," he
        said, "and
        > > start having them based on jobs and health insurance and a
        foreign
        > > policy that's consistent with American values."
        > >       Dean isn't alone among major Democratic contenders who're
        > > rarely seen at church.
        > >       Sen. John Kerry of Massachusetts occasionally attends
        > > Catholic Mass, but is "very private about his religion," said
        aide David
        > > Wade. "If he's in someplace like Davenport or Dubuque, with a big
        > > Catholic community, he'll go to church."
        > >       Rep. Dick Gephardt of Missouri, another major contender,
        > > mentions when campaigning that he had a Baptist church
        scholarship for
        > > college. But he doesn't mention God or religion beyond that. "He
        is a
        > > religious person," said aide Erik Smith. "He does not regularly
        go to
        > > church."
        > >       Smith conceded the political challenge. "Republican
        > > candidates," he said, "have been talking to those who worship
        regularly
        > > in a language they can relate to. Too often, Democrats speak a
        more
        > > secular language that they're unable to relate to."
        > >       Retired Gen. Wesley Clark's father was Jewish, but Clark
        was
        > > raised first as a Methodist, then as a Baptist, converted to
        Catholicism
        > > as a young adult and now attends the Presbyterian Church. "I'm
        > > spiritual. I'm religious. I'm a strong Christian and I'm a
        Catholic, but
        > > I go to Presbyterian Church," Clark said in an interview this
        week being
        > > circulated by his campaign.
        > >       Lieberman, who does speak the language of faith and
        > > religion, said his party should set aside its aversion to
        religion and
        > > embrace it as a message harmonious with its core principles. But
        he
        > > insisted that any such stance must be born of principal, not
        politics.
        > >       "I didn't become religious because of a focus group," he
        > > said. "I have a sense of mission. Republicans act as if they
        have a
        > > monopoly on values or faith-based values. They don't."
        > > U.S. voters are
        > > split along religious lines By Steven ThommaKnight Ridder
        Newspaper
        > > s       DES
        > > MOINES, Iowa — Want
        > > to know how Americans will vote next Election Day? Wa
        > > tch what they do the weekend
        > >
        > >
        > > http://www.deseretnews.com/dn/view/0,1249,565035471,00.html
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