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Re: [Amateur_Microscopy] Fossil sounds

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  • Jon Hudson
    Hold the Mayo. ... From: Glenn To: Amateur_Microscopy@yahoogroups.com Sent: Friday, July 27, 2012 6:18 PM Subject: [Amateur_Microscopy] Fossil sounds Hi
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 27, 2012
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      Hold the Mayo.
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Glenn
      Sent: Friday, July 27, 2012 6:18 PM
      Subject: [Amateur_Microscopy] Fossil sounds

       

      Hi Everyone:
       
      There is a fascinating article in the current issue of Microscopy Today magazine: "Microscopy Reveals the Chirping of a Jurassic Katydid!"  It reports on a fossil Katydid specimen found in Inner Mongolia, China, that was used to reconstruct the sounds made by that old guy 165 million years ago. Really fascinating piece of work and some nice photos and explanatory text.
       
      Microscopy Today is a free-subscription magazine, and you can also access it on-line at http://www.microscopy-today.com/.  I have the great honor of being on the Editorial Board of this magazine, and one of my duties is to recruit or write articles for it. If any of you has one up his sleeve that meets the high standards of this magazine (or close-enough), please contact me off-list. If I don't do better at this job than I have this past year, I am afraid I will be fired! 
       
      - Glenn

    • rodnebri
      Very interesting, they didn`t say how they were able to reproduce the sounds of the extinct species, but i`m sure they took examples from modern day species
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 27, 2012
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        Very interesting, they didn`t say how they were able to reproduce the sounds of the extinct species, but i`m sure they took examples from modern day species and worked in the difference.
        I think a lot can be learned by the natural sounds of nature, in many places you have to leave the modern day noises.
         
        Rodney,
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Glenn
        Sent: Friday, July 27, 2012 12:18 PM
        Subject: [Amateur_Microscopy] Fossil sounds

        Hi Everyone:
         
        There is a fascinating article in the current issue of Microscopy Today magazine: "Microscopy Reveals the Chirping of a Jurassic Katydid!"  It reports on a fossil Katydid specimen found in Inner Mongolia, China, that was used to reconstruct the sounds made by that old guy 165 million years ago. Really fascinating piece of work and some nice photos and explanatory text.
         
        Microscopy Today is a free-subscription magazine, and you can also access it on-line at http://www.microscopy-today.com/.  I have the great honor of being on the Editorial Board of this magazine, and one of my duties is to recruit or write articles for it. If any of you has one up his sleeve that meets the high standards of this magazine (or close-enough), please contact me off-list. If I don't do better at this job than I have this past year, I am afraid I will be fired! 
         
        - Glenn
      • Charles Guevara
        Thanks for the link to that publication, Glenn.  I liked so many of the articles (the few that were not over my head with their technical nature).  One issue
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 29, 2012
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          Thanks for the link to that publication, Glenn.  I liked so many of the articles (the few that were not over my head with their technical nature).  One issue on lightmicroscopy measure of living cells thickness/ and volumes recalled for me the concept of 'negative staining' with India Ink.
           
             Of course deduceing Neanderthals cooking procedures (the authors state Neanderthals ranged from the middle east to Belgium)...from the starch ganules in Neanderthal tooth tartar build up was thoughtful.
           
             But reconstructing accoustical behaviors on ancient insects from replicas of their 'fiddles and bows'....hmmm.  When I walk the puppies after dark, under the hanging boughs of our huge Black Walnut tree...the insects which make a sort of speculative atonnal series of scratchy chirps...these reach a remote dim region of my awareness.  It's such a cold and mechanical soundscape of our summer night...even black crickets get a sense of emotion in their sounds by comparison to whom ever is hauntingly overhead in that huge Black Walnut tree.
           
             I'd bet even a subtle layer of cuticular wax on the living insect would drastically alter the sounds they perhaps made with their body parts..too many variables from the fossilized 'insect fiddles and bows'...to a fossil sound being enjoyed by us today.  I guess I'd like the researchers to carefully replicate a current type of insects acoustical-generating parts...see if a sound can be 'played' which the live insect makes!
           
             It's a wonderful idea...I just think so many issues beyond the 'scratch surfaces which fossilized'..even the resiliant protiens which permit resonant energy storage at various frequencies of vibration...fossil sounds for me are a poetry just beyond our achievement.  Great magazine, thanks for the link.  all the best to all, charlie guevara

          From: Glenn <glennshipley@...>
          To: Amateur_Microscopy@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Friday, July 27, 2012 12:18 PM
          Subject: [Amateur_Microscopy] Fossil sounds

           
          Hi Everyone:
           
          There is a fascinating article in the current issue of Microscopy Today magazine: "Microscopy Reveals the Chirping of a Jurassic Katydid!"  It reports on a fossil Katydid specimen found in Inner Mongolia, China, that was used to reconstruct the sounds made by that old guy 165 million years ago. Really fascinating piece of work and some nice photos and explanatory text.
           
          Microscopy Today is a free-subscription magazine, and you can also access it on-line at http://www.microscopy-today.com/.  I have the great honor of being on the Editorial Board of this magazine, and one of my duties is to recruit or write articles for it. If any of you has one up his sleeve that meets the high standards of this magazine (or close-enough), please contact me off-list. If I don't do better at this job than I have this past year, I am afraid I will be fired! 
           
          - Glenn


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