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Byronic love and hate

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  • nekkid
    The joys of mutual hate to keep them warm, Instead of love, that mere hallucination? Now hatred is by far the longest pleasure; Men love in haste, but they
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 5, 2006
      "The joys of mutual hate to keep them warm,
      Instead of love, that mere hallucination?
      Now hatred is by far the longest pleasure;
      Men love in haste, but they detest at leisure."
      from Lord Byron: "Don Juan: Canto the First"

      "A neat, snug study on a winter's night,
      A book, friend, single lady, or a glass
      Of claret, sandwich, and an appetite,
      Are things which make an English evening pass;
      Though certes by no means so grand a sight
      As is a theatre lit up by gas.
      I pass my evenings in long galleries solely,
      And that's the reason I'm so melancholy.

      "Alas! man makes that great which makes him little:
      I grant you in a church't is very well:
      What speaks of Heaven should by no means be brittle,
      But strong and lasting, till no tongue can tell
      Their names who rear'd it; but huge houses fit ill--
      And huge tombs worse-- mankind, since Adam fell:
      Methinks the story of the tower of Babel
      Might teach them this much better than I'm able.

      "Babel was Nimrod's hunting-box, and then
      A town of gardens, walls, and wealth amazing,
      Where Nabuchadonosor, king of men,
      Reign'd, till one summer's day he took to grazing,
      And Daniel tamed the lions in their den,
      The people's awe and admiration raising;
      'T was famous, too, for Thisbe and for Pyramus,
      And the calumniated queen Semiramis.

      "That injured Queen by chroniclers so coarse
      Has been accused (I doubt not by conspiracy)
      Of an improper friendship for her horse
      (Love, like religion, sometimes runs to heresy):
      This monstrous tale had probably its source
      (For such exaggerations here and there I see)
      In writing 'Courser' by mistake for 'Courier:'
      I wish the case could come before a jury here.

      "But to resume,-- should there be (what may not
      Be in these days?) some infidels, who don't,
      Because they can't find out the very spot
      Of that same Babel, or because they won't
      (Though Claudius Rich, Esquire, some bricks has got,
      And written lately two memoirs upon't),
      Believe the Jews, those unbelievers, who
      Must be believed, though they believe not you,

      "Yet let them think that Horace has exprest
      Shortly and sweetly the masonic folly
      Of those, forgetting the great place of rest,
      Who give themselves to architecture wholly;
      We know where things and men must end at best:
      A moral (like all morals) melancholy,
      And 'Et sepulchri immemor struis domos'
      Shows that we build when we should but entomb us."
      from Lord Byron: "Don Juan: Canto the Fifth"

      http://oldpoetry.com/oauthor/show/Lord_George_Gordon_Byron
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