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Re: Green Ash or White Oak in PA?

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  • Jeff
    Thanks for another vote to go ahead with kiln dried. I m convinced.
    Message 1 of 9 , Nov 30, 2009
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      Thanks for another vote to go ahead with kiln dried. I'm convinced.


      --- In Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com, bschless@... wrote:
      >
      > I concur. I used kiln dried wood and it worked fine.
      >
      > Beau Schless
      > President/CEO
      > NOTEbookS Library Automation Systems
      > HTTP://WWW.RASCO.COM
      > PH: 1.(978) 443-2996
      >
      >
      >
      > "jsinjpma" <jsinjpma@...>
      > Sent by: Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
      > 11/30/2009 07:15 AM
      > Please respond to
      > Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
      >
      >
      > To
      > Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
      > cc
      >
      > Subject
      > [Airolite_Boats] Re: Green Ash or White Oak in PA?
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      > Jeff,
      >
      > I concur with cm below that kiln dried wood will work fine, and I think if
      > you search the archives you'll find several other posts that confirm this.
      > I used kiln dried white oak that had sat around my shop for about 20
      > years. I milled out the ribs to width and thickness, and did not bother to
      > pre-soak them--I loaded them dry into the steam box, steamed them for
      > about 25-30 minutes, and they bent quite readily. Because I steamed them
      > dry, and because this particular white oak was pretty dense and heavy, I
      > gave them a few minutes longer than recommended, but I'm not sure that
      > they really needed it.
      >
      > Wetter wood definitely steam bends more easily than drier wood, though, so
      > if you want to you can easily bring kiln dried wood back to the moisture
      > content of green wood by just soaking it in water, as cm did.
      >
      > In my opinion, much more important than the green vs. kiln-dried issue is
      > to try to find the clearest, straightest grained wood possible. Tiny
      > knots, wavy grain and other imperfections can give you problems. Planing
      > and sanding the ribs very smooth, and slightly rounding the edges before
      > bending helps.
      >
      > I've only built one boat, so take my advice for what it's worth, but I
      > would say if you can get green wood without too much trouble, fine. If
      > not, don't hesitate to use air dried or kiln dried--just get the best
      > grained board you can find, and all will go well. The main thing is not to
      > let this delay your getting started. If your experience is anything like
      > mine, once you get going you'll be having so much fun building your boat
      > you'll wish you'd started sooner...
      >
      > Jim
      >
      > --- In Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com, "cmrv6" <cmrv6@> wrote:
      > >
      > > I ended up using ash from a lcl hardwood co. Yes it was kiln dried but I
      > cut it up soaked it in the pool for 24 hours then steamed it and it worked
      > fine. cm
      > >
      > > --- In Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff" <jlaman@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Does anyone know where to purchase green ash or green white oak in PA
      > for ribs (Snowshoe 14)? I anticipated this would be easy, but it's turned
      > out not to be. I live in central PA, but am willing to drive a ways or pay
      > shipping if need be. Thanks for any suggestions! Jeff
      > > >
      > >
      >
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