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Re: RIBS: Glue or Sinew?

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  • rueffingkidding
    My understanding is that one of the main points of the Aleutian baidarka and (to a lesser degree) Greenland kayak building traditions was to use high
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 15, 2009
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      My understanding is that one of the main points of the Aleutian baidarka and (to a lesser degree) Greenland kayak building traditions was to use high flexibility to achieve seaworthiness and carrying capacity beyond what a boat of such modest volume could otherwise hope to achieve. Platt Monfort's Geodesic Airolite method was designed to create a very light-weight boat that is within the financial and technical abilities of a neophyte to build. Platt leveraged the methods long used to construct fabric-covered aircraft wings, a medium that is by design fairly rigid, relative to a baidarka. Examples in Morris' book (which I have) show a great deal of integrity to the traditional design paradigms, as Monfort's plans and instructions do to his own concepts. Despite some superficial similarities, the two design philosophies differ considerably. I would suggest that you decide what kind of boat you want to build, and stay reasonably true to the appropriate concepts for that design. If you want to build a more traditional SOF craft, allow me to recommend (in addition to Morris's excellent book) "The Aleutian Kayak" by Wolfgang Brink (ISBN 0-07-007893-9). While not traditional with respect to materials, George Dyson's "Baidarka" may also be worth a read. Attempts to improve a design through improvisation are laudable, but are best based on a thorough knowledge of a basic design that (in my opinion) can only come from building it.

      -Roland

      --- In Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com, Patrick Dengate <petroglyph@...> wrote:
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      > Artificial sinew is flat, waxed cord made from nylon or polyester that mimics natural sinew. It's used by leather workers, weavers, and kayak builders.. It is the recommended material to bind together ribs and stringers in "The Solo Carry" by Hilary Russell in Woodenboat magazine (issues205 & 206), and in the book, "Building Skin-On-Frame Boats" by Robert Morris, who also operates the Brewery Creek Boat Shop in Vancouver, BC.
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      > I thought the WHOLE POINT of a skin-on-frame boat, besides weight, is that it is flexible, and merges with the medium through which it moves?
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      > --- On Mon, 6/15/09, Scott Perkins <2scott@...> wrote:
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      > From: Scott Perkins <2scott@...>
      > Subject: Re: [Airolite_Boats] RIBS: Glue or Sinew?
      > To: Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
      > Date: Monday, June 15, 2009, 8:00 PM
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      > What is artificial sinew ?
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      > Scott
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      > "petroglyph@rocketma il.com" wrote:
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      > > Hi,
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      > > I am building the Snowshoe 12, and have steamed, bent, and clamped in place the first two ribs. The plans call for epoxy to secure the ribs to the stringers. Two other sources of info I'm consulting use artificial sinew to bind together the ribs & stringers. I am guessing the sinew is used because it is more traditional and makes a more flexible boat.
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      > > Has anyone here used both? Opinions on either method and its advantages?
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