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Re: [Airolite_Boats] Re: plans questions

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  • AUGUST HAHN
    Thank you,guess I could figure it out like that it,s just that for what I paid for the plansĀ  was exspectng a lttle more accurate details
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 11, 2009
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      Thank you,guess I could figure it out like that it,s just that for what I paid for the plans  was exspectng a lttle more accurate details


      From: second_floor_loft <second_floor_loft@...>
      To: Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Thursday, June 11, 2009 2:30:35 PM
      Subject: [Airolite_Boats] Re: plans questions

      August:

      On my build (again the Classic 12) I measured the plan drawing and did a simple scale up on paper. For instance if the drawing was 12 inches long and the boat is 12 feet... one inch to the foot. Therefore if the ribs appear to be say, 1/2 inch apart then it means they are 6 inches apart at full size. Then, based on the location of other "knowns" such s the station molds I located the ribs. It takes a little time, but it's not too complicated. The best way is to just start building things and not get too tied up in the details before you start. Things become clear as you proceed. Having not seem your plans, I don't know what it would scale out to but that's the general idea. And you can always clamp small pieces of rib stock in place until you get it to look right, mark the positions and go from there.

      Sincerely:
      Paul T

    • jopalenchar@mindspring.com
      I would also add that the plan sheets themselves contain an amazing amount of information. Unfortunately, we are not professional boatbuilders and so the
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 12, 2009
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        I would also add that the plan sheets themselves contain an amazing amount of information.  Unfortunately, we are not professional boatbuilders and so the beautifully drawn and extremely informative (to those who know how to read them) plans are like so much greek to most of us.  Good luck with your build.  Be patient and read and re-read Platt's "Instruction Book" and study the plan sheets.  Many dimensions, quantities, etc. are "buried" in those drawings.

        john


        -----Original Message-----
        From: AUGUST HAHN
        Sent: Jun 12, 2009 12:13 AM
        To: Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [Airolite_Boats] Re: plans questions



        Thank you,guess I could figure it out like that it,s just that for what I paid for the plans  was exspectng a lttle more accurate details


        From: second_floor_ loft <second_floor_ loft@yahoo. com>
        To: Airolite_Boats@ yahoogroups. com
        Sent: Thursday, June 11, 2009 2:30:35 PM
        Subject: [Airolite_Boats] Re: plans questions

        August:

        On my build (again the Classic 12) I measured the plan drawing and did a simple scale up on paper. For instance if the drawing was 12 inches long and the boat is 12 feet... one inch to the foot. Therefore if the ribs appear to be say, 1/2 inch apart then it means they are 6 inches apart at full size. Then, based on the location of other "knowns" such s the station molds I located the ribs. It takes a little time, but it's not too complicated. The best way is to just start building things and not get too tied up in the details before you start. Things become clear as you proceed. Having not seem your plans, I don't know what it would scale out to but that's the general idea. And you can always clamp small pieces of rib stock in place until you get it to look right, mark the positions and go from there.

        Sincerely:
        Paul T

      • AUGUST HAHN
        Oh so thats how it works. ________________________________ From: jopalenchar@mindspring.com To: Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 12, 2009
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          Oh so thats how it works.


          From: "jopalenchar@..." <jopalenchar@...>
          To: Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Friday, June 12, 2009 6:48:41 AM
          Subject: Re: [Airolite_Boats] Re: plans questions

          I would also add that the plan sheets themselves contain an amazing amount of information.  Unfortunately, we are not professional boatbuilders and so the beautifully drawn and extremely informative (to those who know how to read them) plans are like so much greek to most of us.  Good luck with your build.  Be patient and read and re-read Platt's "Instruction Book" and study the plan sheets.  Many dimensions, quantities, etc. are "buried" in those drawings.

          john


          -----Original Message-----
          From: AUGUST HAHN
          Sent: Jun 12, 2009 12:13 AM
          To: Airolite_Boats@ yahoogroups. com
          Subject: Re: [Airolite_Boats] Re: plans questions



          Thank you,guess I could figure it out like that it,s just that for what I paid for the plans  was exspectng a lttle more accurate details


          From: second_floor_ loft <second_floor_ loft@yahoo. com>
          To: Airolite_Boats@ yahoogroups. com
          Sent: Thursday, June 11, 2009 2:30:35 PM
          Subject: [Airolite_Boats] Re: plans questions

          August:

          On my build (again the Classic 12) I measured the plan drawing and did a simple scale up on paper. For instance if the drawing was 12 inches long and the boat is 12 feet... one inch to the foot. Therefore if the ribs appear to be say, 1/2 inch apart then it means they are 6 inches apart at full size. Then, based on the location of other "knowns" such s the station molds I located the ribs. It takes a little time, but it's not too complicated. The best way is to just start building things and not get too tied up in the details before you start. Things become clear as you proceed. Having not seem your plans, I don't know what it would scale out to but that's the general idea. And you can always clamp small pieces of rib stock in place until you get it to look right, mark the positions and go from there.

          Sincerely:
          Paul T

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