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Re: [Airolite_Boats] Modifications to Classic 14

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  • Roger L
    I mostly sail on prairie and mountain lakes. I ve never built a Geodesic design, but have admired them for years and have built several small sailboats to 22
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 7, 2012
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      I mostly sail on prairie and mountain lakes. I've never built a Geodesic design, but have admired them for years and have built several small sailboats to 22 feet and taken them quite a ways. Inland, our winds are variable, but tend to be much higher than is common on the coast. Also, the inland winds are much gustier. All of which means I agree that you will need more and easier reefing ability.
       
      But I don't see the type of sail making much difference.  Whatever type of sail you feel comfortable reefing would be my choice. I like to make simple experimental sails where the luff is stretched taut by means of a topping lift instead of being laced to the stub mast. That makes it possible to scandalize the rig by folding the sail in half if everything else goes to pot. When sizing things, the basic rule is to keep the COE just aft of the center of lateral resistance. From your sketch, it looks like you have done that. Good luck with it! I'd say your plan looks like it should work just fine.
            Roger L.  
       
       
      - Original Message -----
      From: tkw954
      Sent: Wednesday, March 07, 2012 3:46 PM
      Subject: [Airolite_Boats] Modifications to Classic 14

      I'm about to get started a Geodesic Airolite Classic 14.
      I've got a couple deviations from the design that I'm considering and would appreciate some feedback:

      1) Substitute balanced lugsail for the design's sprit-boomed sail. The design calls for a 35 ft^2 sprit-boomed sail laced to a 12 ft mast or a "light air rig" of 42 ft^2 on a 14 ft mast. Since I'll be sailing (and rowing) on prairie lakes with sudden changes in wind, I'm not sure that this is the right setup due to inability to adjust sail area on the water and likely inability to drop drop the mast for rowing. I'm proposing a balanced lugsail instead (reefable and shorter spars for stowage). My design is roughed in here: http://imgur.com/jZmJn. This is based on Todd Brandshaw's CLC Skerry rig proportions, scaled to 42 ft^2, with a line of reef points at 35 ft^2. I placed the centre of effort on the same vertical line as the original design, with the lugsail's CoE about 6 inches lower (although this may have to be raised to get under the boom). Does this look reasonable?

      2) Rudder: the design calls for a fixed rudder (http://imgur.com/jZmJn), However, I'd prefer an adjustable type to prevent damage on beaching. I'm leaning toward a cassette-style like a Goat Island Skiff (http://farm1.static.flickr.com/144/3...dac1a798cd.jpg). I'd have a foil with an 8 inch chord and set the length to maintain the same submerged area (although it's adjustable, so less critical). Reasonable?

      Stay tuned for building pics.

      Thanks,
      Travis



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    • Peter North
      I believe you are on the right track with your concern about the boom being too low. I think I would plan on raising it at least six inches but not more than
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 8, 2012
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        I believe you are on the right track with your concern about the boom being too low.  I think I would plan on raising it at least six inches but not more than a foot, otherwise I think you will regret using the boom set up over the long run.  The Skerry boom seems to be about 2’ above the seat level.  You may not need that much, but your current configuration does not seem to be high enough.  I realize that this will change some of the dynamics compared to the original sail. 

         

        Personally I think I would stick with the original rig, but come up with a better reefing method.  Would it be possible to put a rope track in the mast, perhaps using an appropriate router bit?  Then you might be able to lift the mast and roll the sail around the mast to shorten the sail area.  Not something you want to do in a seaway, but could be used with some forethought.  You could also go to the Bolger yahoo site and look at some rigs there.  One of my favorite rigs on a small boat is the gunter rig, like on a mirror dinghy.  I think you could shorten that down with some forethought.  You still have the boom issue but it does reduce spar length.  Peter

        :> 1) Substitute balanced lugsail for the design's sprit-boomed sail. The design calls for a 35 ft^2 sprit-boomed sail laced to a 12 ft mast or a "light air rig" of 42 ft^2 on a 14 ft mast. Since I'll be sailing (and rowing) on prairie lakes with sudden changes in wind, I'm not sure that this is the right setup due to inability to adjust sail area on the water and likely inability to drop drop the mast for rowing. I'm proposing a balanced lugsail instead (reefable and shorter spars for stowage). My design is roughed in here: http://imgur.com/jZmJn. This is based on Todd Brandshaw's CLC Skerry rig proportions, scaled to 42 ft^2, with a line of reef points

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