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Re: coverings alternatives

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  • rueffingkidding
    Matthew, that s very interesting. I originally became interested in Platt s GA technique as a possible alternative method for surfboard building. The
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 7, 2011
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      Matthew, that's very interesting. I originally became interested in Platt's GA technique as a possible alternative method for surfboard building. The microcrystalline wax idea that you describe seems like it might lend itself well to that application. Can you tell me anything about the outside surface coefficient of friction or texture when applying this substance to fabric? Would the covering remain transparent/translucent? Do you have any pointers to more extensive discussions about use of this substance in a covering system (of any kind)? THanks in advance.

      -Roland
      --- In Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com, "Matthew" <matt.passarelli@...> wrote:
      >
      > A fiber's ability to taughten via heat or chemistry is important to us.
      >
      ...
      > Microcrystalline wax ( $10 blocks for chandlers) burns at almost twice the Tg of polyester (the temp at which you're shrinking it, so you can basically do a combo process, like how you'd wax your skis, plus shrinking the fabric. It's tough as heck but can still flex, imparts stiffness, and is impregnated between the fibers, and is highly hydrophobic. Topcoat with more wax, buff down slightly and rebuild the surface 1-2 times a season. A really good option if you're not planning on sheathing the dacron and want to just get the darned thing in the water same day, don't want crud on you hands, dont feel like sanding, and want to spend less than 20 bucks on a high gloss coating material.
      >
      >
    • Matthew
      My courses haven t gotten up to fluid friction of elastomeric surfaces in my coursework, but aircraft poly is pretty coarse to the touch. crocryalline wax
      Message 2 of 6 , Sep 8, 2011
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        My courses haven't gotten up to fluid friction of elastomeric surfaces in my coursework, but aircraft poly is pretty coarse to the touch. crocryalline wax dries tacky, but tough,). good substrate for collonite fleet wax. apply as directed I specify MC wax because you can bring run the 350F iron over it SAFELY with little odor, wear pvc gloves though.

        Basically its just "waxed duck." The MC impreg rubbed on beforehand doesnt effect shrinkage%, and gives added stiffness to the skin. Not very fancy. This is an option for people who are not concerned about abraision during use, and just want to go faster.


        --- In Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com, "rueffingkidding" <rueffingkidding@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        > Matthew, that's very interesting. I originally became interested in Platt's GA technique as a possible alternative method for surfboard building. The microcrystalline wax idea that you describe seems like it might lend itself well to that application. Can you tell me anything about the outside surface coefficient of friction or texture when applying this substance to fabric? Would the covering remain transparent/translucent? Do you have any pointers to more extensive discussions about use of this substance in a covering system (of any kind)? THanks in advance.
        >
        > -Roland
        > --- In Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com, "Matthew" <matt.passarelli@> wrote:
        > >
        > > A fiber's ability to taughten via heat or chemistry is important to us.
        > >
        > ...
        > > Microcrystalline wax ( $10 blocks for chandlers) burns at almost twice the Tg of polyester (the temp at which you're shrinking it, so you can basically do a combo process, like how you'd wax your skis, plus shrinking the fabric. It's tough as heck but can still flex, imparts stiffness, and is impregnated between the fibers, and is highly hydrophobic. Topcoat with more wax, buff down slightly and rebuild the surface 1-2 times a season. A really good option if you're not planning on sheathing the dacron and want to just get the darned thing in the water same day, don't want crud on you hands, dont feel like sanding, and want to spend less than 20 bucks on a high gloss coating material.
        > >
        > >
        >
      • Matthew
        Pardon that disjointed typing. On standby at work (tv grip). So I haven t tested for the coefficient(s) of friction, and probably won t unless it were
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 9, 2011
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          Pardon that disjointed typing. On standby at work (tv grip).

          So I haven't tested for the coefficient(s) of friction, and probably won't unless it were something to sell.

          MC wax is opaque white or brown. I know very little about surfboards, other than the fact that a lot of glass cloth is aimed at your market, and that surfboards look really cool on top of grand wagoneers.

          Any assembly I can envision regarding a surfboard with a woven polyester fabric membrane would end up holding a lot of water inside it WHEN the poly fails. If you want to sheath in poly then look for nonwoven veil mat... really common for your application, designed to be wet out with resin and dries transparent. Its light weight, <1oz/yd^2. Use resin, not wax. Let us know if you try to shrink it, would like to hear what happens.

          --- In Airolite_Boats@...,Matthew" <matt.passarelli@...> wrote:
          >
          > My courses haven't gotten up to fluid friction of elastomeric surfaces in my coursework, but aircraft poly is pretty coarse to the touch. crocryalline wax dries tacky, but tough,). good substrate for collonite fleet wax. apply as directed I specify MC wax because you can bring run the 350F iron over it SAFELY with little odor, wear pvc gloves though.
          >
          > Basically its just "waxed duck." The MC impreg rubbed on beforehand doesnt effect shrinkage%, and gives added stiffness to the skin. Not very fancy. This is an option for people who are not concerned about abraision during use, and just want to go faster.
          >
          >
          > --- In Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com, "rueffingkidding" <rueffingkidding@> wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Matthew, that's very interesting. I originally became interested in Platt's GA technique as a possible alternative method for surfboard building. The microcrystalline wax idea that you describe seems like it might lend itself well to that application. Can you tell me anything about the outside surface coefficient of friction or texture when applying this substance to fabric? Would the covering remain transparent/translucent? Do you have any pointers to more extensive discussions about use of this substance in a covering system (of any kind)? THanks in advance.
          > >
          > > -Roland
          > > --- In Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com, "Matthew" <matt.passarelli@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > A fiber's ability to taughten via heat or chemistry is important to us.
          > > >
          > > ...
          > > > Microcrystalline wax ( $10 blocks for chandlers) burns at almost twice the Tg of polyester (the temp at which you're shrinking it, so you can basically do a combo process, like how you'd wax your skis, plus shrinking the fabric. It's tough as heck but can still flex, imparts stiffness, and is impregnated between the fibers, and is highly hydrophobic. Topcoat with more wax, buff down slightly and rebuild the surface 1-2 times a season. A really good option if you're not planning on sheathing the dacron and want to just get the darned thing in the water same day, don't want crud on you hands, dont feel like sanding, and want to spend less than 20 bucks on a high gloss coating material.
          > > >
          > > >
          > >
          >
        • rueffingkidding
          Thanks for the reply. I think that water inside is an inevitability for any hollow surfboard design. Consequently my concept includes a draining mechanism.
          Message 4 of 6 , Sep 9, 2011
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            Thanks for the reply. I think that "water inside" is an inevitability for any hollow surfboard design. Consequently my concept includes a draining mechanism. And that is probably as far off-topic as I should take this wonderful board. Thanks again for that very educational introduction of wax for waterproofing shrinkable fabric.

            -Roland

            --- In Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com, "Matthew" <matt.passarelli@...> wrote:
            ...
            >
            > Any assembly I can envision regarding a surfboard with a woven polyester fabric membrane would end up holding a lot of water inside it WHEN the poly fails. If you want to sheath in poly then look for nonwoven veil mat... really common for your application, designed to be wet out with resin and dries transparent. Its light weight, <1oz/yd^2. Use resin, not wax. Let us know if you try to shrink it, would like to hear what happens.
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