Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [Airolite_Boats] Coupla Questions

Expand Messages
  • Richard Bertram
    Right or wrong, I put my heatn bond on bare wood. I used a double layer of heatn bond at the gunwale. Helped stick down the kevlar roving better. Of course I
    Message 1 of 26 , Feb 11, 2011
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      Right or wrong, I put my heatn'bond on bare wood. I used a double layer of heatn'bond at the gunwale. Helped stick down the kevlar roving better. Of course I ran short of tape and had to steal some from the cut water reinforcement piece.  Results were excellent. Richard

      --- On Thu, 2/10/11, rkofler@... <rkofler@...> wrote:

      From: rkofler@... <rkofler@...>
      Subject: Re: [Airolite_Boats] Coupla Questions
      To: Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Thursday, February 10, 2011, 9:06 PM

       

      Thanks again for all the responses to my questions. One question I asked was whether Heat and Bond tape should be put over bare or varnished wood. Someone responded that it should go over raw wood. However my partner on this project pointed out that Platt's instruction sheet calls for putting it over varnished wood. Platt  says to practice with the Heat and Bond tape and some varnished scrap wood. Which is correct, or are they both correct?

      Another question I have is after we varnish the frame and install the fabric, do we varnish the inside of the fabric, or does it remain unfinished?

      Thanks
      Roger


      -----Original Message-----
      From: Bassman4940 <bassman4940@...>
      To: Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wed, Feb 9, 2011 9:13 am
      Subject: Re: [Airolite_Boats] Coupla Questions

       
      Roger,
      I used 2 coats white of water-based exterior house paint and got the results I think you are looking for.  I thined the paint before applying so the first coat would soak into the fabric and so there wouldn't be any brush stokes visible in the second layer.
      You could probably also use a roller with a short nap and achieve pretty good results if you thin the paint down a little.
      Hope this helps!
      Rick

      --- On Wed, 2/9/11, rkofler@... <rkofler@...> wrote:

      From: rkofler@... <rkofler@...>
      Subject: Re: [Airolite_Boats] Coupla Questions
      To: Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Wednesday, February 9, 2011, 11:46 AM

       
      Thanks for the suggestions. We will do some tests of whatever we decide to try. What we are looking for is a fabric finish that is the least transparent. We would like to minimize, or eliminate, the look of the frame showing through the fabric, but at the same time retain the look of the varnished frame against the white fabric on the inside of the boat. We may be asking too much.

      Roger



      -----Original Message-----
      From: Roger Crier <rogercrier@...>
      To: Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tue, Feb 8, 2011 9:11 am
      Subject: Re: [Airolite_Boats] Coupla Questions

       
      Whenever you use paint on the Airolite you should really do a test piece to see how your paint affects the rip stop qualities and strength of the Airolene.
       
      Once stretched and in a bare state, the airolene is very very strong. If you had a test piece held out by an accomplice, you couldn't punch through it with a fist for instance. (well we couldn't on our "Walker Wingsail" boats) It is also strong when painted with the correct paints, but even then, I have seen it fail the punch test once it has been doped and painted, but this could have been because there was already a flaw in the cloth, so be warned. Do some before and after tests.
       
      Why not have a go at applying the "Monocote" model aircraft covering as Platt suggests in the blurb, as these weaknesses in the Airolene only appear when the weave is filled with a paint like substance, and the Monocote is a covering that leaves the weave in it's original strong state?
       
      Hope that helps!
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Monday, February 07, 2011 9:15 PM
      Subject: Re: [Airolite_Boats] Coupla Questions

      Heat and bond goes on raw wood.

      People paint these things with everything!  I used some water based polyeurethane, ran out, and started using spray poly (from the hardware store).  If you don't mind the color you can use Latex house paint.  If you use airplane dope for goodness sake put it on out of doors!
      Beau Schless
      NOTEbookS Library Automation
      (978) 443-2996
      http://www.rasco.com



      From:        rkofler@...
      To:        Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
      Date:        02/07/2011 03:56 PM
      Subject:        Re: [Airolite_Boats]  Coupla Questions
      Sent by:        Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com




       
      We are building the Classic 14 and I have two questions for the group:

      Should Heat and Bond tape be applied to bare wood or varnished wood?

      Has anyone tried using the aircraft method of finishing the fabric,
      with airplane dope and aluminum paint?

      Thank you for your expertise.

      Roger




      Finding fabulous fares is fun.
      Let Yahoo! FareChase search your favorite travel sites to find flight and hotel bargains.
    • John Scott
      Roger, An other idea,being a full time RV,er .My Airolite was exposed to UV&weather 24/7 and spent the majority of time living on top of my car.Years ago i was
      Message 2 of 26 , Feb 11, 2011
      View Source
      Roger,
      An other idea,being a full time RV,er .My Airolite was exposed to UV&weather 24/7 and spent the majority of time living on top of my car.Years ago i was able to talk to Platt as in his video/manual mentioned the use of Derusto or Rust-o-lem Alu paint.It is oil base.When we do aircraft fabric first coat is uv alu .Then a finish coat.I need a boat that is bullet & Uv proof.Using a foam brush on fabric, push the paint on, this pushes the paint into the pours of the fabric then smoothing it as you go alone. very time consuming.this method will penetrate the fabric . After it dryers, in a dark area hold a light over the the boat and look under neath this will show any spots you have missed.After this you can apply  a nice finish.Ck.pic,s  Enjoy a great project, scotty

      On Thu, Feb 10, 2011 at 11:06 PM, <rkofler@...> wrote:
       

      Thanks again for all the responses to my questions. One question I asked was whether Heat and Bond tape should be put over bare or varnished wood. Someone responded that it should go over raw wood. However my partner on this project pointed out that Platt's instruction sheet calls for putting it over varnished wood. Platt  says to practice with the Heat and Bond tape and some varnished scrap wood. Which is correct, or are they both correct?

      Another question I have is after we varnish the frame and install the fabric, do we varnish the inside of the fabric, or does it remain unfinished?

      Thanks
      Roger


      -----Original Message-----
      From: Bassman4940 <bassman4940@...>
      To: Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wed, Feb 9, 2011 9:13 am
      Subject: Re: [Airolite_Boats] Coupla Questions

       
      Roger,
      I used 2 coats white of water-based exterior house paint and got the results I think you are looking for.  I thined the paint before applying so the first coat would soak into the fabric and so there wouldn't be any brush stokes visible in the second layer.
      You could probably also use a roller with a short nap and achieve pretty good results if you thin the paint down a little.
      Hope this helps!
      Rick

      --- On Wed, 2/9/11, rkofler@... <rkofler@...> wrote:

      From: rkofler@... <rkofler@...>
      Subject: Re: [Airolite_Boats] Coupla Questions
      To: Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Wednesday, February 9, 2011, 11:46 AM

       
      Thanks for the suggestions. We will do some tests of whatever we decide to try. What we are looking for is a fabric finish that is the least transparent. We would like to minimize, or eliminate, the look of the frame showing through the fabric, but at the same time retain the look of the varnished frame against the white fabric on the inside of the boat. We may be asking too much.

      Roger



      -----Original Message-----
      From: Roger Crier <rogercrier@...>
      To: Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tue, Feb 8, 2011 9:11 am
      Subject: Re: [Airolite_Boats] Coupla Questions

       
      Whenever you use paint on the Airolite you should really do a test piece to see how your paint affects the rip stop qualities and strength of the Airolene.
       
      Once stretched and in a bare state, the airolene is very very strong. If you had a test piece held out by an accomplice, you couldn't punch through it with a fist for instance. (well we couldn't on our "Walker Wingsail" boats) It is also strong when painted with the correct paints, but even then, I have seen it fail the punch test once it has been doped and painted, but this could have been because there was already a flaw in the cloth, so be warned. Do some before and after tests.
       
      Why not have a go at applying the "Monocote" model aircraft covering as Platt suggests in the blurb, as these weaknesses in the Airolene only appear when the weave is filled with a paint like substance, and the Monocote is a covering that leaves the weave in it's original strong state?
       
      Hope that helps!
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Monday, February 07, 2011 9:15 PM
      Subject: Re: [Airolite_Boats] Coupla Questions

      Heat and bond goes on raw wood.

      People paint these things with everything!  I used some water based polyeurethane, ran out, and started using spray poly (from the hardware store).  If you don't mind the color you can use Latex house paint.  If you use airplane dope for goodness sake put it on out of doors!
      Beau Schless
      NOTEbookS Library Automation
      (978) 443-2996
      http://www.rasco.com



      From:        rkofler@...
      To:        Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
      Date:        02/07/2011 03:56 PM
      Subject:        Re: [Airolite_Boats]  Coupla Questions
      Sent by:        Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com




       
      We are building the Classic 14 and I have two questions for the group:

      Should Heat and Bond tape be applied to bare wood or varnished wood?

      Has anyone tried using the aircraft method of finishing the fabric,
      with airplane dope and aluminum paint?

      Thank you for your expertise.

      Roger



    • Aaron Wood
      Roger, I m sure both will work well. I put it on top of varnish and its holding wonderfully. My boat is painted, and I left the fabric raw inside. However if
      Message 3 of 26 , Feb 11, 2011
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        Roger,

        I'm sure both will work well. I put it on top of varnish and its holding wonderfully.

        My boat is painted, and I left the fabric raw inside. However if the kevlar roving ever starts to come loose I'll probably varnish the inside. So far it doesn't seem to need it.

        Cheers,

        Aaron

        Sent from my BlackBerry


        From: rkofler@...
        Sender: Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Fri, 11 Feb 2011 00:06:55 -0500
        To: <Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com>
        ReplyTo: Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [Airolite_Boats] Coupla Questions

         

        Thanks again for all the responses to my questions. One question I asked was whether Heat and Bond tape should be put over bare or varnished wood. Someone responded that it should go over raw wood. However my partner on this project pointed out that Platt's instruction sheet calls for putting it over varnished wood. Platt  says to practice with the Heat and Bond tape and some varnished scrap wood. Which is correct, or are they both correct?

        Another question I have is after we varnish the frame and install the fabric, do we varnish the inside of the fabric, or does it remain unfinished?

        Thanks
        Roger


        -----Original Message-----
        From: Bassman4940 <bassman4940@...>
        To: Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wed, Feb 9, 2011 9:13 am
        Subject: Re: [Airolite_Boats] Coupla Questions

         
        Roger,
        I used 2 coats white of water-based exterior house paint and got the results I think you are looking for.  I thined the paint before applying so the first coat would soak into the fabric and so there wouldn't be any brush stokes visible in the second layer.
        You could probably also use a roller with a short nap and achieve pretty good results if you thin the paint down a little.
        Hope this helps!
        Rick

        --- On Wed, 2/9/11, rkofler@... <rkofler@...> wrote:

        From: rkofler@... <rkofler@...>
        Subject: Re: [Airolite_Boats] Coupla Questions
        To: Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Wednesday, February 9, 2011, 11:46 AM

         
        Thanks for the suggestions. We will do some tests of whatever we decide to try. What we are looking for is a fabric finish that is the least transparent. We would like to minimize, or eliminate, the look of the frame showing through the fabric, but at the same time retain the look of the varnished frame against the white fabric on the inside of the boat. We may be asking too much.

        Roger



        -----Original Message-----
        From: Roger Crier <rogercrier@...>
        To: Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tue, Feb 8, 2011 9:11 am
        Subject: Re: [Airolite_Boats] Coupla Questions

         
        Whenever you use paint on the Airolite you should really do a test piece to see how your paint affects the rip stop qualities and strength of the Airolene.
         
        Once stretched and in a bare state, the airolene is very very strong. If you had a test piece held out by an accomplice, you couldn't punch through it with a fist for instance. (well we couldn't on our "Walker Wingsail" boats) It is also strong when painted with the correct paints, but even then, I have seen it fail the punch test once it has been doped and painted, but this could have been because there was already a flaw in the cloth, so be warned. Do some before and after tests.
         
        Why not have a go at applying the "Monocote" model aircraft covering as Platt suggests in the blurb, as these weaknesses in the Airolene only appear when the weave is filled with a paint like substance, and the Monocote is a covering that leaves the weave in it's original strong state?
         
        Hope that helps!
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Monday, February 07, 2011 9:15 PM
        Subject: Re: [Airolite_Boats] Coupla Questions

        Heat and bond goes on raw wood.

        People paint these things with everything!  I used some water based polyeurethane, ran out, and started using spray poly (from the hardware store).  If you don't mind the color you can use Latex house paint.  If you use airplane dope for goodness sake put it on out of doors!
        Beau Schless
        NOTEbookS Library Automation
        (978) 443-2996
        http://www.rasco.com



        From:        rkofler@...
        To:        Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
        Date:        02/07/2011 03:56 PM
        Subject:        Re: [Airolite_Boats]  Coupla Questions
        Sent by:        Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com




         
        We are building the Classic 14 and I have two questions for the group:

        Should Heat and Bond tape be applied to bare wood or varnished wood?

        Has anyone tried using the aircraft method of finishing the fabric,
        with airplane dope and aluminum paint?

        Thank you for your expertise.

        Roger


      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.