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Wood Choice/Selection for Snowshoe

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  • Greg
    I know that this has come up time and again but I still have a few questions. Reading the directions,it says I need straight grain, clear wood for the
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 26, 2011
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      I know that this has come up time and again but I still have a few questions. Reading the directions,it says I "need straight grain, clear wood for the longitudinal memebers of the boat. Spruce, Douglas Fir, Mahogany or Poplar are the preferred woods." I take this to mean that I can use Poplar for the Keelson, Stringers, Gunwale, Inwale, Rub Rail, and possibly the floor boards. I have access to a lumber yard where I can by S2S poplar in 4/4 at 16' lengths. I would like to use this for the above mentioned pieces and then either Ash or Oak for the ribs. Does anyone see a problem with this?

      Thanks for your help.
    • Bassman4940
      Hi Greg, IMHO Poplar is a pretty good choice and I used it for the stringers because it was the only straight-grained and clear of knots wood I could find in
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 26, 2011
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        Hi Greg,
        IMHO Poplar is a pretty good choice and I used it for the stringers because it was the only straight-grained and clear of knots wood I could find in 16ft lengths. It worked out well, and was easy to rip them thin enough with the table saw.  
           I used ash for the ribs, and it was easy to bend the ribs without splitting after steaming them.  I broke a couple in the beginning stages of the steaming and bending, but after you get the hang of it, it's quite fun to work with. 
        As for the keelson and gunnels I used oak trim from Home Depot sold in the interior trim section in 14' lengths.
        I'm sure there are lots of different opinions on wood choices, but these are what I used because it was what was available.
        Good luck on your project!
        Rick


        --- On Wed, 1/26/11, Greg <gmreevesrodco@...> wrote:

        From: Greg <gmreevesrodco@...>
        Subject: [Airolite_Boats] Wood Choice/Selection for Snowshoe
        To: Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Wednesday, January 26, 2011, 12:17 PM

         

        I know that this has come up time and again but I still have a few questions. Reading the directions,it says I "need straight grain, clear wood for the longitudinal memebers of the boat. Spruce, Douglas Fir, Mahogany or Poplar are the preferred woods." I take this to mean that I can use Poplar for the Keelson, Stringers, Gunwale, Inwale, Rub Rail, and possibly the floor boards. I have access to a lumber yard where I can by S2S poplar in 4/4 at 16' lengths. I would like to use this for the above mentioned pieces and then either Ash or Oak for the ribs. Does anyone see a problem with this?

        Thanks for your help.


      • bschless@rasco.com
        ash works for the ribs. That s what I used. Beau Schless NOTEbookS Library Automation (978) 443-2996 http://www.rasco.com From: Greg
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 26, 2011
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          ash works for the ribs.  That's what I used.
          Beau Schless
          NOTEbookS Library Automation
          (978) 443-2996
          http://www.rasco.com



          From:        "Greg" <gmreevesrodco@...>
          To:        Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
          Date:        01/26/2011 12:21 PM
          Subject:        [Airolite_Boats] Wood Choice/Selection for Snowshoe
          Sent by:        Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com




           

          I know that this has come up time and again but I still have a few questions. Reading the directions,it says I "need straight grain, clear wood for the longitudinal memebers of the boat. Spruce, Douglas Fir, Mahogany or Poplar are the preferred woods." I take this to mean that I can use Poplar for the Keelson, Stringers, Gunwale, Inwale, Rub Rail, and possibly the floor boards. I have access to a lumber yard where I can by S2S poplar in 4/4 at 16' lengths. I would like to use this for the above mentioned pieces and then either Ash or Oak for the ribs. Does anyone see a problem with this?

          Thanks for your help.


        • a_wood_@rogers.com
          Greg, You ll be fine with all that you mentioned except the rub rail. That, the cutwaters and the keel should be hardwood. Your bending stock that you use for
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 26, 2011
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            Greg,

            You'll be fine with all that you mentioned except the rub rail. That, the cutwaters and the keel should be hardwood. Your bending stock that you use for ribs will work here.

            I made a boat once with cedar rub rails... Slivers easily, after I jammed one of those nice long slivers up under my fingernail I changed my opinion on softwood rubrails!

            On my snowshoe arrow 14 I scarfed my bending stock (it was 8' ash) to get the length I needed for the rubrails. I used the ash as well for cutwaters and I didn't put (didn't want) a keel on.

            Cheers,

            Aaron

            Sent from my BlackBerry device on the Rogers Wireless Network


            From: "Greg" <gmreevesrodco@...>
            Sender: Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2011 17:17:15 -0000
            To: <Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com>
            ReplyTo: Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [Airolite_Boats] Wood Choice/Selection for Snowshoe

             

            I know that this has come up time and again but I still have a few questions. Reading the directions,it says I "need straight grain, clear wood for the longitudinal memebers of the boat. Spruce, Douglas Fir, Mahogany or Poplar are the preferred woods." I take this to mean that I can use Poplar for the Keelson, Stringers, Gunwale, Inwale, Rub Rail, and possibly the floor boards. I have access to a lumber yard where I can by S2S poplar in 4/4 at 16' lengths. I would like to use this for the above mentioned pieces and then either Ash or Oak for the ribs. Does anyone see a problem with this?

            Thanks for your help.

          • Greg
            Thanks for the replies everyone. I think I am going to alter my plans just a little and make the rub rail, cutwaters, keel (if I use one), and possibly the
            Message 5 of 6 , Jan 27, 2011
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              Thanks for the replies everyone. I think I am going to alter my plans just a little and make the rub rail, cutwaters, keel (if I use one), and possibly the gunwale and inwale out of a nice board of Mahogany that I have had for several years. I will have to scarf it to make it work but I think I will have enough. Should look pretty sharp and give it a little added toughness on those areas.

              --- In Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com, a_wood_@... wrote:
              >
              > Greg,
              >
              > You'll be fine with all that you mentioned except the rub rail. That, the cutwaters and the keel should be hardwood. Your bending stock that you use for ribs will work here.
              >
              > I made a boat once with cedar rub rails... Slivers easily, after I jammed one of those nice long slivers up under my fingernail I changed my opinion on softwood rubrails!
              >
              > On my snowshoe arrow 14 I scarfed my bending stock (it was 8' ash) to get the length I needed for the rubrails. I used the ash as well for cutwaters and I didn't put (didn't want) a keel on.
              >
              > Cheers,
              >
              > Aaron
              > Sent from my BlackBerry device on the Rogers Wireless Network
              >
              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: "Greg" <gmreevesrodco@...>
              > Sender: Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
              > Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2011 17:17:15
              > To: <Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com>
              > Reply-To: Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
              > Subject: [Airolite_Boats] Wood Choice/Selection for Snowshoe
              >
              > I know that this has come up time and again but I still have a few questions. Reading the directions,it says I "need straight grain, clear wood for the longitudinal memebers of the boat. Spruce, Douglas Fir, Mahogany or Poplar are the preferred woods." I take this to mean that I can use Poplar for the Keelson, Stringers, Gunwale, Inwale, Rub Rail, and possibly the floor boards. I have access to a lumber yard where I can by S2S poplar in 4/4 at 16' lengths. I would like to use this for the above mentioned pieces and then either Ash or Oak for the ribs. Does anyone see a problem with this?
              >
              > Thanks for your help.
              >
            • Richard Bertram
              I used a piece of cherry wood somebody gave be for the cutwater and it looks good. I wrapped the small piece of cutwater in the wet paper towels and aluminum
              Message 6 of 6 , Jan 27, 2011
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                I used a piece of cherry wood somebody gave be for the cutwater and it looks good. I wrapped the small piece of cutwater in the wet paper towels and aluminum foil and steamed it in the oven, easier than setting up the steamer again.  I seated cutwater, keel, and rubrails in 3M 5200 adhesive (tough stuff, but cleans up with mineral spirits when wet). My rubrails were redwood simply because the lumber store had a beautifully clear piece for cheap. So far so good.     Richard

                --- On Thu, 1/27/11, Greg <gmreevesrodco@...> wrote:

                From: Greg <gmreevesrodco@...>
                Subject: [Airolite_Boats] Re: Wood Choice/Selection for Snowshoe
                To: Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Thursday, January 27, 2011, 8:39 AM

                 

                Thanks for the replies everyone. I think I am going to alter my plans just a little and make the rub rail, cutwaters, keel (if I use one), and possibly the gunwale and inwale out of a nice board of Mahogany that I have had for several years. I will have to scarf it to make it work but I think I will have enough. Should look pretty sharp and give it a little added toughness on those areas.

                --- In Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com, a_wood_@... wrote:
                >
                > Greg,
                >
                > You'll be fine with all that you mentioned except the rub rail. That, the cutwaters and the keel should be hardwood. Your bending stock that you use for ribs will work here.
                >
                > I made a boat once with cedar rub rails... Slivers easily, after I jammed one of those nice long slivers up under my fingernail I changed my opinion on softwood rubrails!
                >
                > On my snowshoe arrow 14 I scarfed my bending stock (it was 8' ash) to get the length I needed for the rubrails. I used the ash as well for cutwaters and I didn't put (didn't want) a keel on.
                >
                > Cheers,
                >
                > Aaron
                > Sent from my BlackBerry device on the Rogers Wireless Network
                >
                > -----Original Message-----
                > From: "Greg" <gmreevesrodco@...>
                > Sender: Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
                > Date: Wed, 26 Jan 2011 17:17:15
                > To: <Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com>
                > Reply-To: Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
                > Subject: [Airolite_Boats] Wood Choice/Selection for Snowshoe
                >
                > I know that this has come up time and again but I still have a few questions. Reading the directions,it says I "need straight grain, clear wood for the longitudinal memebers of the boat. Spruce, Douglas Fir, Mahogany or Poplar are the preferred woods." I take this to mean that I can use Poplar for the Keelson, Stringers, Gunwale, Inwale, Rub Rail, and possibly the floor boards. I have access to a lumber yard where I can by S2S poplar in 4/4 at 16' lengths. I would like to use this for the above mentioned pieces and then either Ash or Oak for the ribs. Does anyone see a problem with this?
                >
                > Thanks for your help.
                >


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