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Pre-order queries (nerves)

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  • martyn.long
    Hi Folks, I m a new member (uk) and just about to take the plunge to construct a classic 12. Before I try to set up the order, to settle my last minute nerves,
    Message 1 of 10 , Jan 20, 2011
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      Hi Folks,

      I'm a new member (uk) and just about to take the plunge to construct a classic 12.

      Before I try to set up the order, to settle my last minute nerves, I would really appreciate it if someone could answer just a few last questions:

      How do they handle? I am mainly interested in rowing and would like to know whether they are much different from a standard boat. Due to their lightness are they 'skittish'? Can you board and stand up in them ok? Do they tend to get blown about by the wind?
      Would they be at all suitable for some light weather sea conditions? At a push, what wave/wind conditions would you be confident going out in?

      Ideally I would try one out myself, but I just haven't seen these about in this country.

      I would really appreciate any advice about this.

      BTW, I have done various forms of boating and currently share a 17' pocket cruiser which I sail in tidal waters.

      Many thanks

      Martyn
    • hillhikerz
      Hi Folks, I too am a new member (Monterey CA.) and just about to take the plunge to construct a SnowShoe 16 or 18 and am wondering the same ? s... I have
      Message 2 of 10 , Jan 20, 2011
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        Hi Folks, I too am a new member (Monterey CA.) and just about to take the plunge to construct a SnowShoe 16 or 18 and am wondering the same ?'s... I have estuaries to go in but most of the lakes in the area are closed due to some mussel that is taking up residence... soooo I would like to row the snowshoe as a single in some chop and a bit of wind... ? what can I expect... Michael

        PS: Thanks Martyn for getting me to jump in here...
      • Bassman4940
        Hi Martyn, You pose some great questions!   I built a 15ft Rob-Roy kayak, the same basic hull design as the snowshoe canoes.    They definitely are a bit
        Message 3 of 10 , Jan 21, 2011
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          Hi Martyn,
          You pose some great questions!   I built a 15ft Rob-Roy kayak, the same basic hull design as the snowshoe canoes.
             They definitely are a bit skittish and tippy, but nothing you can't get used to with a little practice.  If you design your seats so they are as low as possible that will give you some added stability.

            As far as boarding and standing up well... remember they are 50% lighter than a conventional canoe so not as forgiving in that department.  If that is really a big concern for you, you might want to consider something with "harder chines" that will give more resitance to leaning and tipping.

           The wind will have a tendency to push you off track, but again nothing you can't overcome with a but of practice.   I do most of my kayaking on lakes so I added an oak keel that helps keep it on track.  I don't want to give you the impression that they are unsafe, they're as seaworthy as most canoes, but just give yourself some paddling time before heading off across big water.

            One last thing I would suggest is adding some sort of floatation bags or foam in each end.  It was easy with a kayak, but a canoe you may have to get creative... under the seats is another possibility.

          Good luck with your project!!!
          Rick

          --- On Thu, 1/20/11, martyn.long <martyn.long@...> wrote:

          From: martyn.long <martyn.long@...>
          Subject: [Airolite_Boats] Pre-order queries (nerves)
          To: Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Thursday, January 20, 2011, 5:19 PM

           

          Hi Folks,

          I'm a new member (uk) and just about to take the plunge to construct a classic 12.

          Before I try to set up the order, to settle my last minute nerves, I would really appreciate it if someone could answer just a few last questions:

          How do they handle? I am mainly interested in rowing and would like to know whether they are much different from a standard boat. Due to their lightness are they 'skittish'? Can you board and stand up in them ok? Do they tend to get blown about by the wind?
          Would they be at all suitable for some light weather sea conditions? At a push, what wave/wind conditions would you be confident going out in?

          Ideally I would try one out myself, but I just haven't seen these about in this country.

          I would really appreciate any advice about this.

          BTW, I have done various forms of boating and currently share a 17' pocket cruiser which I sail in tidal waters.

          Many thanks

          Martyn


        • Martyn Long
          Many thanks Rick, This sort of confirms what I thought - there has to be some impact from not having the weight of an ordinary boat. This must be in terms of
          Message 4 of 10 , Jan 21, 2011
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            Many thanks Rick,
             
            This sort of confirms what I thought - there has to be some impact from not having the weight of an ordinary boat. This must be in terms of lack of inertia - which will make it react more quickly, as well as the lack of counterbalancing weight in some situations. As you say, this must make it important to place one's weight correctly and to stay low down in the boat.
             
            I was already thinking about putting some blocks of foam either end in case the worst happens. Your idea of putting it under the seats would seem to be good.
             
            I was also thinking that I might just try some ballast (couple of lengths of lead), which would have the added advantage that they could be adjustable in terms of size and position. I suppose the reactiveness could also make it nice once one gets used to it - e.g. responsiveness, although there is probably some loss of momentum between strokes. OTOH of course, reducing the wetted area would also reduce drag, so I suppose I'm just going to have to see how it all works out.
             
            I am going to bite the bullet this afternoon and see how I can get hold of the stuff.
             
            Still 'negotiating' with my wife about where it is going to be built. I think I will sneak it into a side room bit by bit!
             
            Cheers
             
            Martyn
             

             


            From: Bassman4940 <bassman4940@...>
            To: Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Fri, 21 January, 2011 12:46:44
            Subject: Re: [Airolite_Boats] Pre-order queries (nerves)

             

            Hi Martyn,
            You pose some great questions!   I built a 15ft Rob-Roy kayak, the same basic hull design as the snowshoe canoes.
               They definitely are a bit skittish and tippy, but nothing you can't get used to with a little practice.  If you design your seats so they are as low as possible that will give you some added stability.

              As far as boarding and standing up well... remember they are 50% lighter than a conventional canoe so not as forgiving in that department.  If that is really a big concern for you, you might want to consider something with "harder chines" that will give more resitance to leaning and tipping.

             The wind will have a tendency to push you off track, but again nothing you can't overcome with a but of practice.   I do most of my kayaking on lakes so I added an oak keel that helps keep it on track.  I don't want to give you the impression that they are unsafe, they're as seaworthy as most canoes, but just give yourself some paddling time before heading off across big water.

              One last thing I would suggest is adding some sort of floatation bags or foam in each end.  It was easy with a kayak, but a canoe you may have to get creative... under the seats is another possibility.

            Good luck with your project!!!
            Rick

            --- On Thu, 1/20/11, martyn.long <martyn.long@...> wrote:

            From: martyn.long <martyn.long@...>
            Subject: [Airolite_Boats] Pre-order queries (nerves)
            To: Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Thursday, January 20, 2011, 5:19 PM

             

            Hi Folks,

            I'm a new member (uk) and just about to take the plunge to construct a classic 12.

            Before I try to set up the order, to settle my last minute nerves, I would really appreciate it if someone could answer just a few last questions:

            How do they handle? I am mainly interested in rowing and would like to know whether they are much different from a standard boat. Due to their lightness are they 'skittish'? Can you board and stand up in them ok? Do they tend to get blown about by the wind?
            Would they be at all suitable for some light weather sea conditions? At a push, what wave/wind conditions would you be confident going out in?

            Ideally I would try one out myself, but I just haven't seen these about in this country.

            I would really appreciate any advice about this.

            BTW, I have done various forms of boating and currently share a 17' pocket cruiser which I sail in tidal waters.

            Many thanks

            Martyn


          • Martyn Long
            Hi Michael, Your concerns seem very similar to mine. I am also thinking of using the boat in estuaries, and even open coastal areas if the weather is ok (I
            Message 5 of 10 , Jan 21, 2011
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              Hi Michael,
               
              Your concerns seem very similar to mine. I am also thinking of using the boat in estuaries, and even open coastal areas if the weather is ok (I live not too far from the coast). I just like the idea of being able to carry the boat down to the water in places where even a trailer would be difficult. I would also like to do some fishing and it seems likely that an electric motor might be good for this (hence my need for a transom).
               
              I am also not too far from 'the broads' (an area in England made up from a maze of shallow lakes and waterways - from extensive peat cutting a long time ago). Very sheltered most of the time so would be a good place to roam around in. Again, a lot of access problems will disappear.
               
              All the best
               
              Martyn


              From: hillhikerz <hillhikerz@...>
              To: Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Fri, 21 January, 2011 2:00:43
              Subject: [Airolite_Boats] Re: Pre-order queries (nerves)

               

              Hi Folks, I too am a new member (Monterey CA.) and just about to take the plunge to construct a SnowShoe 16 or 18 and am wondering the same ?'s... I have estuaries to go in but most of the lakes in the area are closed due to some mussel that is taking up residence... soooo I would like to row the snowshoe as a single in some chop and a bit of wind... ? what can I expect... Michael

              PS: Thanks Martyn for getting me to jump in here...

            • Bassman4940
              Hi Martyn, Glad to be of help and if you have any questions during the procurement of materials and the build itself, there are a lot of knowledgeable people
              Message 6 of 10 , Jan 21, 2011
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                Hi Martyn,
                Glad to be of help and if you have any questions during the procurement of materials and the build itself, there are a lot of knowledgeable people on this forum.
                 
                I actually built my kayak in the living room as a winter time project. That was before I was married of course and could get the house as messy as I wanted!   My advice would be to have someplace (outdoors or a garage) to do all the major cuts of the wood and rough sanding sanding. 

                A good precise table saw is a MUST for ripping all the boards into such thin strips.

                Yes there is definitely a trade-off between weight and stability, but I can only speak from the kayak standpoint and not the canoe.   But because it has multiple chines, it is less tippy than a round bottom canoe IMHO.    You can see pictures of my boat on the forum in the folder "Ric's Rob-Roy".

                Also one other thing I should mention is that the designer (Platt Monfort) was not much of a technical writer, so the actual build directions were sketchy and hard to follow.  But the blueprints were excellent and actually just built mine directly from the blueprints.

                I would highly suggest going with the "kit" if it's still available becuase it includes the Dacron, Kevlar and epoxy.  
                Hope this info helps...


                --- On Fri, 1/21/11, Martyn Long <martyn.long@...> wrote:

                From: Martyn Long <martyn.long@...>
                Subject: Re: [Airolite_Boats] Pre-order queries (nerves)
                To: Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Friday, January 21, 2011, 8:29 AM

                 

                Many thanks Rick,
                 
                This sort of confirms what I thought - there has to be some impact from not having the weight of an ordinary boat. This must be in terms of lack of inertia - which will make it react more quickly, as well as the lack of counterbalancing weight in some situations. As you say, this must make it important to place one's weight correctly and to stay low down in the boat.
                 
                I was already thinking about putting some blocks of foam either end in case the worst happens. Your idea of putting it under the seats would seem to be good.
                 
                I was also thinking that I might just try some ballast (couple of lengths of lead), which would have the added advantage that they could be adjustable in terms of size and position. I suppose the reactiveness could also make it nice once one gets used to it - e.g. responsiveness, although there is probably some loss of momentum between strokes. OTOH of course, reducing the wetted area would also reduce drag, so I suppose I'm just going to have to see how it all works out.
                 
                I am going to bite the bullet this afternoon and see how I can get hold of the stuff.
                 
                Still 'negotiating' with my wife about where it is going to be built. I think I will sneak it into a side room bit by bit!
                 
                Cheers
                 
                Martyn
                 

                 


                From: Bassman4940 <bassman4940@...>
                To: Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Fri, 21 January, 2011 12:46:44
                Subject: Re: [Airolite_Boats] Pre-order queries (nerves)

                 

                Hi Martyn,
                You pose some great questions!   I built a 15ft Rob-Roy kayak, the same basic hull design as the snowshoe canoes.
                   They definitely are a bit skittish and tippy, but nothing you can't get used to with a little practice.  If you design your seats so they are as low as possible that will give you some added stability.

                  As far as boarding and standing up well... remember they are 50% lighter than a conventional canoe so not as forgiving in that department.  If that is really a big concern for you, you might want to consider something with "harder chines" that will give more resitance to leaning and tipping.

                 The wind will have a tendency to push you off track, but again nothing you can't overcome with a but of practice.   I do most of my kayaking on lakes so I added an oak keel that helps keep it on track.  I don't want to give you the impression that they are unsafe, they're as seaworthy as most canoes, but just give yourself some paddling time before heading off across big water.

                  One last thing I would suggest is adding some sort of floatation bags or foam in each end.  It was easy with a kayak, but a canoe you may have to get creative... under the seats is another possibility.

                Good luck with your project!!!
                Rick

                --- On Thu, 1/20/11, martyn.long <martyn.long@...> wrote:

                From: martyn.long <martyn.long@...>
                Subject: [Airolite_Boats] Pre-order queries (nerves)
                To: Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Thursday, January 20, 2011, 5:19 PM

                 

                Hi Folks,

                I'm a new member (uk) and just about to take the plunge to construct a classic 12.

                Before I try to set up the order, to settle my last minute nerves, I would really appreciate it if someone could answer just a few last questions:

                How do they handle? I am mainly interested in rowing and would like to know whether they are much different from a standard boat. Due to their lightness are they 'skittish'? Can you board and stand up in them ok? Do they tend to get blown about by the wind?
                Would they be at all suitable for some light weather sea conditions? At a push, what wave/wind conditions would you be confident going out in?

                Ideally I would try one out myself, but I just haven't seen these about in this country.

                I would really appreciate any advice about this.

                BTW, I have done various forms of boating and currently share a 17' pocket cruiser which I sail in tidal waters.

                Many thanks

                Martyn



              • Bassman4940
                I think the snowshoe would be perfect for the estuaries, shallow lakes, marshes and any flat water.   I ve had mine out on the ocean, off the coast of Maine,
                Message 7 of 10 , Jan 21, 2011
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                  I think the snowshoe would be perfect for the estuaries, shallow lakes, marshes and any flat water.   I've had mine out on the ocean, off the coast of Maine, but stayed in the inlets where the chop wasn't to high.   If you keep the center of gravity as low as possible, there isn't any more danger of tipping over than a regular canoe.
                   
                  What I've seen others do is kneel in it, which would lower your gravity and give you better bracing capability.  I also would recommend a kayak paddle just for the extra push.

                  Hope this helps... good luck!
                  Rick


                  --- On Fri, 1/21/11, Martyn Long <martyn.long@...> wrote:

                  From: Martyn Long <martyn.long@...>
                  Subject: Re: [Airolite_Boats] Re: Pre-order queries (nerves)
                  To: Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Friday, January 21, 2011, 8:40 AM

                   

                  Hi Michael,
                   
                  Your concerns seem very similar to mine. I am also thinking of using the boat in estuaries, and even open coastal areas if the weather is ok (I live not too far from the coast). I just like the idea of being able to carry the boat down to the water in places where even a trailer would be difficult. I would also like to do some fishing and it seems likely that an electric motor might be good for this (hence my need for a transom).
                   
                  I am also not too far from 'the broads' (an area in England made up from a maze of shallow lakes and waterways - from extensive peat cutting a long time ago). Very sheltered most of the time so would be a good place to roam around in. Again, a lot of access problems will disappear.
                   
                  All the best
                   
                  Martyn


                  From: hillhikerz <hillhikerz@...>
                  To: Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Fri, 21 January, 2011 2:00:43
                  Subject: [Airolite_Boats] Re: Pre-order queries (nerves)

                   

                  Hi Folks, I too am a new member (Monterey CA.) and just about to take the plunge to construct a SnowShoe 16 or 18 and am wondering the same ?'s... I have estuaries to go in but most of the lakes in the area are closed due to some mussel that is taking up residence... soooo I would like to row the snowshoe as a single in some chop and a bit of wind... ? what can I expect... Michael

                  PS: Thanks Martyn for getting me to jump in here...


                • bschless@rasco.com
                  Has anytone trie usig gallon milk bottles under seats as floatation? Beau Schless NOTEbookS Library Automation (978) 443-2996 http://www.rasco.com From:
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jan 21, 2011
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                    Has anytone trie usig gallon milk bottles under seats as floatation?
                    Beau Schless
                    NOTEbookS Library Automation
                    (978) 443-2996
                    http://www.rasco.com



                    From:        Martyn Long <martyn.long@...>
                    To:        Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
                    Date:        01/21/2011 08:41 AM
                    Subject:        Re: [Airolite_Boats] Pre-order queries (nerves)
                    Sent by:        Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com




                     

                    Many thanks Rick,

                     
                    This sort of confirms what I thought - there has to be some impact from not having the weight of an ordinary boat. This must be in terms of lack of inertia - which will make it react more quickly, as well as the lack of counterbalancing weight in some situations. As you say, this must make it important to place one's weight correctly and to stay low down in the boat.
                     
                    I was already thinking about putting some blocks of foam either end in case the worst happens. Your idea of putting it under the seats would seem to be good.
                     
                    I was also thinking that I might just try some ballast (couple of lengths of lead), which would have the added advantage that they could be adjustable in terms of size and position. I suppose the reactiveness could also make it nice once one gets used to it - e.g. responsiveness, although there is probably some loss of momentum between strokes. OTOH of course, reducing the wetted area would also reduce drag, so I suppose I'm just going to have to see how it all works out.
                     
                    I am going to bite the bullet this afternoon and see how I can get hold of the stuff.
                     
                    Still 'negotiating' with my wife about where it is going to be built. I think I will sneak it into a side room bit by bit!
                     
                    Cheers
                     
                    Martyn
                     




                    From: Bassman4940 <bassman4940@...>
                    To:
                    Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent:
                    Fri, 21 January, 2011 12:46:44
                    Subject:
                    Re: [Airolite_Boats] Pre-order queries (nerves)


                     

                    Hi Martyn,
                    You pose some great questions!   I built a 15ft Rob-Roy kayak, the same basic hull design as the snowshoe canoes.
                      They definitely are a bit skittish and tippy, but nothing you can't get used to with a little practice.  If you design your seats so they are as low as possible that will give you some added stability.

                     As far as boarding and standing up well... remember they are 50% lighter than a conventional canoe so not as forgiving in that department.  If that is really a big concern for you, you might want to consider something with "harder chines" that will give more resitance to leaning and tipping.

                    The wind will have a tendency to push you off track, but again nothing you can't overcome with a but of practice.   I do most of my kayaking on lakes so I added an oak keel that helps keep it on track.  I don't want to give you the impression that they are unsafe, they're as seaworthy as most canoes, but just give yourself some paddling time before heading off across big water.

                     One last thing I would suggest is adding some sort of floatation bags or foam in each end.  It was easy with a kayak, but a canoe you may have to get creative... under the seats is another possibility.

                    Good luck with your project!!!
                    Rick

                    --- On Thu, 1/20/11, martyn.long <martyn.long@...> wrote:


                    From: martyn.long <martyn.long@...>
                    Subject: [Airolite_Boats] Pre-order queries (nerves)
                    To: Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Thursday, January 20, 2011, 5:19 PM

                     

                    Hi Folks,

                    I'm a new member (uk) and just about to take the plunge to construct a classic 12.

                    Before I try to set up the order, to settle my last minute nerves, I would really appreciate it if someone could answer just a few last questions:

                    How do they handle? I am mainly interested in rowing and would like to know whether they are much different from a standard boat. Due to their lightness are they 'skittish'? Can you board and stand up in them ok? Do they tend to get blown about by the wind?
                    Would they be at all suitable for some light weather sea conditions? At a push, what wave/wind conditions would you be confident going out in?

                    Ideally I would try one out myself, but I just haven't seen these about in this country.

                    I would really appreciate any advice about this.

                    BTW, I have done various forms of boating and currently share a 17' pocket cruiser which I sail in tidal waters.

                    Many thanks

                    Martyn



                  • bschless@rasco.com
                    I row in a river that has lots of clam shells. Invariably I knew what was going to happen...it was only a matter of time. Do like I do and carry an emergency
                    Message 9 of 10 , Jan 21, 2011
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                      I row in a river that has lots of clam shells.  Invariably I knew what was going to happen...it was only a matter of time. Do like I do and carry an emergency repair kit.  It consists of:  

                      1) a piece of dacron approx. 2" x 3" long
                      2) A small disposable tube of superglue
                      3) A plastic bag to hold the above in
                      4) A piece of duct tape to tape the above to one of the seat posts.

                      The process is to glue the patch in place, then once it's dried on the skin smear the rest of the super glue over the patch.  Voila!  Instant boat repair.
                      And don't forget...if the rip is really big, use the plastic bag and the duct tape!

                      Beau Schless
                      NOTEbookS Library Automation
                      (978) 443-2996
                      http://www.rasco.com



                      From:        Martyn Long <martyn.long@...>
                      To:        Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
                      Date:        01/21/2011 08:41 AM
                      Subject:        Re: [Airolite_Boats] Re: Pre-order queries (nerves)
                      Sent by:        Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com




                       

                      Hi Michael,

                       
                      Your concerns seem very similar to mine. I am also thinking of using the boat in estuaries, and even open coastal areas if the weather is ok (I live not too far from the coast). I just like the idea of being able to carry the boat down to the water in places where even a trailer would be difficult. I would also like to do some fishing and it seems likely that an electric motor might be good for this (hence my need for a transom).
                       
                      I am also not too far from 'the broads' (an area in England made up from a maze of shallow lakes and waterways - from extensive peat cutting a long time ago). Very sheltered most of the time so would be a good place to roam around in. Again, a lot of access problems will disappear.
                       
                      All the best
                       
                      Martyn


                      From: hillhikerz <hillhikerz@...>
                      To:
                      Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent:
                      Fri, 21 January, 2011 2:00:43
                      Subject:
                      [Airolite_Boats] Re: Pre-order queries (nerves)


                       

                      Hi Folks, I too am a new member (Monterey CA.) and just about to take the plunge to construct a SnowShoe 16 or 18 and am wondering the same ?'s... I have estuaries to go in but most of the lakes in the area are closed due to some mussel that is taking up residence... soooo I would like to row the snowshoe as a single in some chop and a bit of wind... ? what can I expect... Michael

                      PS: Thanks Martyn for getting me to jump in here...


                    • bschless@rasco.com
                      The best floatation would be a heavy vinyl airtight bag that you could insert under the sat then blow up. That s what we do in our sailboat. I m wondering if
                      Message 10 of 10 , Jan 21, 2011
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                        The best floatation would be a heavy vinyl airtight bag that you could insert under the sat then blow up. That's what we do in our sailboat.  I'm wondering if it would be worthwhile building a "box" under the seat that you could fill with a variety of things...tennis balls...packing foam blocks,
                        Beau Schless
                        NOTEbookS Library Automation
                        (978) 443-2996
                        http://www.rasco.com



                        From:        Bassman4940 <bassman4940@...>
                        To:        Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
                        Date:        01/21/2011 08:26 AM
                        Subject:        Re: [Airolite_Boats] Pre-order queries (nerves)
                        Sent by:        Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com




                         

                        Hi Martyn,
                        You pose some great questions!   I built a 15ft Rob-Roy kayak, the same basic hull design as the snowshoe canoes.
                          They definitely are a bit skittish and tippy, but nothing you can't get used to with a little practice.  If you design your seats so they are as low as possible that will give you some added stability.

                         As far as boarding and standing up well... remember they are 50% lighter than a conventional canoe so not as forgiving in that department.  If that is really a big concern for you, you might want to consider something with "harder chines" that will give more resitance to leaning and tipping.

                        The wind will have a tendency to push you off track, but again nothing you can't overcome with a but of practice.   I do most of my kayaking on lakes so I added an oak keel that helps keep it on track.  I don't want to give you the impression that they are unsafe, they're as seaworthy as most canoes, but just give yourself some paddling time before heading off across big water.

                         One last thing I would suggest is adding some sort of floatation bags or foam in each end.  It was easy with a kayak, but a canoe you may have to get creative... under the seats is another possibility.

                        Good luck with your project!!!
                        Rick

                        --- On Thu, 1/20/11, martyn.long <martyn.long@...> wrote:


                        From: martyn.long <martyn.long@...>
                        Subject: [Airolite_Boats] Pre-order queries (nerves)
                        To: Airolite_Boats@yahoogroups.com
                        Date: Thursday, January 20, 2011, 5:19 PM

                         

                        Hi Folks,

                        I'm a new member (uk) and just about to take the plunge to construct a classic 12.

                        Before I try to set up the order, to settle my last minute nerves, I would really appreciate it if someone could answer just a few last questions:

                        How do they handle? I am mainly interested in rowing and would like to know whether they are much different from a standard boat. Due to their lightness are they 'skittish'? Can you board and stand up in them ok? Do they tend to get blown about by the wind?
                        Would they be at all suitable for some light weather sea conditions? At a push, what wave/wind conditions would you be confident going out in?

                        Ideally I would try one out myself, but I just haven't seen these about in this country.

                        I would really appreciate any advice about this.

                        BTW, I have done various forms of boating and currently share a 17' pocket cruiser which I sail in tidal waters.

                        Many thanks

                        Martyn



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