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Re: [Airchairgroup] Old diver pilot needs different set of wings...

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  • William Brewer
         Yeah, I would get regular gliding lessons in a sailplane first, especially with ground launching. You can get in a lot of trouble fast.      I
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 11, 2012
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           Yeah, I would get regular gliding lessons in a sailplane first, especially with ground launching. You can get in a lot of trouble fast.
           I think that airchairs are the way to go.

           -Bill in Tehachapi


      From: Lyle Anderson <uppredator142@...>
      To: William Brewer <wsb1960tr3a@...>
      Sent: Thursday, November 8, 2012 11:04 AM
      Subject: Re: [Airchairgroup] Old diver pilot needs different set of wings...

      Hey Bill good to hear from you.  I am somewhat leery of 3 axis control.  My old Quicksilver was weight shift control petty much a Model “C” Quicksilver HG with a stronger keel to support a motor and some wheels.  As soon as they started putting engines on them, they wanted bigger engines and then they went double surface and 3 axis control (Quicksilver “MX”) and that is when pilots started kill themselves.  The old Single surface weight shift Quick has to be one of the most docile forgiving ultralights ever built.  Case in point here is way I learned.  I was over in Phoenix AZ and I saw a bunch of these things in an open area (now covered with houses) so I went over to look.  No one was around this one and I started walking around it checking it out.  A guy came up and started extolling the virtues of the craft (he worked for U.S. HangGliders).  I asked him what was the glide ratio and he stopped talking, looked at me “you fly a hang glider?”  I responded with a yes.  He asked “do you want to fly it?”  I was like “For sure dude…what do I do?”  Here is my entire training on flying ultralights which took place in 30 seconds or so as I strapped in the swing seat (it had the word Sears molded into it.)  “Ok, hold the bar in give it full throttle and when it kinda starts getting light, push out.  Oh, and don’t let off the throttle when you leave the ground.”  I ordered a kit as soon as I landed.  But I am a purest.  I HATE the noise of a motor.  I want to soar in silence (Motor up turn off, that sound cool).  I have an option to get a Quicksilver “M” for free.  All the parts are there, but by the time I buy a new sail and replace old flight wires etc.  I would have a flying piece of HG history when done, but I want/NEED to soar for hours on end…I think an AirChair would allow this.
      As I said, I taught myself how to fly I have a lot of scars and missing teeth to show for it.  Where can I get training to fly an AirChair?  Or do you just learn to fly a regular sailplane and then transition over to your AirChair? 
       
      Thanks for the come back and cool video!!!  And yea, ParaGliders scare me too!
       Here is a video from back in the day.
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ihOOuYoIJ0
      The guy in the white kite at the start...that is me at the ripe old age of 16.  That is also the kite I had while filming Three for the road.
       
      Andy
       


      On Thu, Nov 8, 2012 at 9:35 AM, William Brewer <wsb1960tr3a@...> wrote:
           I haven't seen any responses to this, which makes me wonder.
           A friend of mine who is a professional test pilot just broke his foot/ankle in a paraglider. Nature didn't intend for humans to use their feet as landing gear. Maybe take-off gear, but not landing.
           I have been a licensed power and sailplane pilot for 35 years. Power flying kind of scares me now. You can get yourself into a lot of trouble fast. A few years ago I generated an AD (airworthiness directive from the FAA) when a rudder centering spring broke and the rudder pedal kicked my leg hard. If I had been turning base to final I might have spun in. The cost of renting sailplanes and paying for tows is prohibitive. I have been gravitating towards foot launched sailplanes and airchairs for a while now.
           I like lake bed auto-towing. Here is a video I made at Coyote Dry Lake (near Barstow). Lots of Red GOAT action.

           http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_VGGt2l0yuI

           From what I have seen, a GOAT is the way to go. Hill launchable, auto-towable, buildable and pretty safe. Floyd Fronius once told me that he thought the GOAT 1 flies best. We have a GOAT 4 where I work and with the amount of rigging wires it has it looks like it would be difficult to set-up and take down.
           I have thought about a ULF-1 UL sailplane, but it looks complicated to build and fragile. I still would like to try one someday.
           Airchairs tow slow.
           Have fun and let us know what you do.

           -Bill in Tehachapi



       


    • red
      Campers, DIY three-axis computer simulator (enclosure is optional) http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Airchairgroup/message/15667 HangSim is still at it, with new
      Message 2 of 6 , Nov 11, 2012
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        Message
        Campers,
           
            DIY three-axis computer simulator (enclosure is optional)
           
           
            HangSim is still at it, with new planes, HGs, and ultralights.  There is a free (five minute) demo that you can re-start, to continue with the same flight, although you will lose the thermal, if you were flying in one.  Thermals can be visible (with cottonwood seeds), or invisible, in the Sim.  Every "Page Up" keystroke adds 100 feet of altitude, in flight.  Click where it says "Fly Now" to start the Sim.  Needs MS-DirectX (also free, linked on the download page).
           
           
            Just one ol' HG pilot to another.   :-) 
           
        Cheers,
        Red
            
        -----Original Message-----
        From: Airchairgroup@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Airchairgroup@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of William Brewer
        Sent: Sunday, November 11, 2012 8:09 AM
        To: Lyle Anderson
        Cc: airchairgroup@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [Airchairgroup] Old diver pilot needs different set of wings...

             Yeah, I would get regular gliding lessons in a sailplane first, especially with ground launching. You can get in a lot of trouble fast.
             I think that airchairs are the way to go.

             -Bill in Tehachapi


        From: Lyle Anderson <uppredator142@...>
        To: William Brewer <wsb1960tr3a@...>
        Sent: Thursday, November 8, 2012 11:04 AM
        Subject: Re: [Airchairgroup] Old diver pilot needs different set of wings...

        Hey Bill good to hear from you.  I am somewhat leery of 3 axis control.  My old Quicksilver was weight shift control petty much a Model “C” Quicksilver HG with a stronger keel to support a motor and some wheels.  As soon as they started putting engines on them, they wanted bigger engines and then they went double surface and 3 axis control (Quicksilver “MX”) and that is when pilots started kill themselves.  The old Single surface weight shift Quick has to be one of the most docile forgiving ultralights ever built.  Case in point here is way I learned.  I was over in Phoenix AZ and I saw a bunch of these things in an open area (now covered with houses) so I went over to look.  No one was around this one and I started walking around it checking it out.  A guy came up and started extolling the virtues of the craft (he worked for U.S. HangGliders).  I asked him what was the glide ratio and he stopped talking, looked at me “you fly a hang glider?”  I responded with a yes.  He asked “do you want to fly it?”  I was like “For sure dude…what do I do?”  Here is my entire training on flying ultralights which took place in 30 seconds or so as I strapped in the swing seat (it had the word Sears molded into it.)  “Ok, hold the bar in give it full throttle and when it kinda starts getting light, push out.  Oh, and don’t let off the throttle when you leave the ground.”  I ordered a kit as soon as I landed.  But I am a purest.  I HATE the noise of a motor.  I want to soar in silence (Motor up turn off, that sound cool).  I have an option to get a Quicksilver “M” for free.  All the parts are there, but by the time I buy a new sail and replace old flight wires etc.  I would have a flying piece of HG history when done, but I want/NEED to soar for hours on end…I think an AirChair would allow this.
        As I said, I taught myself how to fly I have a lot of scars and missing teeth to show for it.  Where can I get training to fly an AirChair?  Or do you just learn to fly a regular sailplane and then transition over to your AirChair? 
         
        Here is a video from back in the day.
        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ihOOuYoIJ0
        The guy in the white kite at the start...that is me at the ripe old age of 16.  That is also the kite I had while filming Three for the road.
         
        Andy
         
        On Thu, Nov 8, 2012 at 9:35 AM, William Brewer <wsb1960tr3a@...> wrote:
             I haven't seen any responses to this, which makes me wonder.
             I like lake bed auto-towing. Here is a video I made at Coyote Dry Lake (near Barstow). Lots of Red GOAT action.

             http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_VGGt2l0yuI

             From what I have seen, a GOAT is the way to go. Hill launchable, auto-towable, buildable and pretty safe. Floyd Fronius once told me that he thought the GOAT 1 flies best. We have a GOAT 4 where I work and with the amount of rigging wires it has it looks like it would be difficult to set-up and take down.
             I have thought about a ULF-1 UL sailplane, but it looks complicated to build and fragile. I still would like to try one someday.
             Airchairs tow slow.
             Have fun and let us know what you do.

             -Bill in Tehachapi
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