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Amateur engineering

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  • Scott Perkins
    I recognized early that engineering was a challenging affair and as I stood by and watched computers become 100 thousand times more powerful, I realize they
    Message 1 of 98 , Apr 1, 2012
      I recognized early that engineering was a challenging affair and
      as I stood by and watched computers become 100 thousand times more
      powerful, I realize they are not going to help that much with making
      it simple. However with todays technology we can implement the
      age old test it, break it, and make the part that broke stronger...
      safely from the ground if we can use the cheap radio transmitters and remote control servos to test our contraptions.
      We could load about 250 pounds of car batteries in the pilot seat
      and that would give us a bunch of electricity. Then we proceed
      to zoom and loop around the sky to see what happens. If the
      batteries survive it should be good enough for us too.
      Who knows a lot about remote control devices ? I think it is
      in South Carolina where a very large scale Remote Control flyin
      is held called "Joe Nall" or something similar and about 5 years
      ago they had a full size ultralight with kawasaki engine
      ( something like the Fisher 202 ) flying remote control.)
      That is where I should go for a crash course in the electronics
      and hardware needed.



      --- On Sun, 4/1/12, gypsyglider <garrywarber@...> wrote:
      > Falling down and bouncing with remains to the wife can
      > happen anytime you are off the ground, and with a tested
      > airframe.  I feel just because it's designed and tested
      > by an un-degreed person like myself dosn't necessarily make
      > it less.  But I have "vested interest" in that view and
      > may be biased. :-)
      > Garry
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > .
      > .
      > Link to Airchair main page for archives, files and photos
      >   http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Airchairgroup/
      > .
      > Link to Mike Sandlin's BUG (Basic Ultralight Glider)
      > website
      > http://m-sandlin.info/
      > .
      > Link to Wikipedia Airchair
      > http://airchairbuild.wikidot.com/
      > .
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >     Airchairgroup-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com
      >
      >
    • Scott Perkins
      Probably the best idea for design not yet mentioned is to simply closely study what hundreds of others have done for thirty years with hanggliders and
      Message 98 of 98 , Apr 1, 2012
        Probably the best idea for design not yet mentioned is to simply
        closely study what hundreds of others have done for thirty years
        with hanggliders and ultralights etc and gain the knowledge that
        unfortunately hundreds have lost their lives over. No real need
        to start from scratch all over.


        --- On Sun, 4/1/12, korygriggs <indoorweather@...> wrote:

        > From: korygriggs <indoorweather@...>
        > Subject: [Airchairgroup] Re: Alternate design options
        > To: Airchairgroup@yahoogroups.com
        > Date: Sunday, April 1, 2012, 10:06 AM
        > WHAT!!! Is this true, there are
        > per-made structural plastic brackets available. I've seen
        > what I think your talking about but I thought they were used
        > in tension. I have looked through aircraft spruce but
        > haven't come across them before. Please send a link.
        >
        > --- In Airchairgroup@yahoogroups.com,
        > 2scott@... wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > > --- In Airchairgroup@yahoogroups.com,
        > Kory Griggs <indoorweather@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > I really like what Paul has sent me and pointed
        > out about
        > > > the rigging problems. I will be heading in that
        > direction of building the
        > > > goat with some design stolen from the
        > quicksliver.
        > > >
        > > > Quicksilver uses 2" square top tube/wing root,
        > everything is bolted off it
        > > > using brackets. I will build this top tube thing
        > and install brackets and
        > > > then see how well it will hold up.
        > > //////////////////////
        > >
        > > No doubt you have seen lots of hanggliders and other
        > powered ultralights and this is probably not new info to you
        > but you dont have to incur the extra weight of a square top
        > tube to get quick and easy assembly.  There are plastic
        > standoffs available as standard product that allows smaller
        > round tubes to be bolted to larger round tubes.
        > >
        > > Take a look in the CPS, Lockwood, LEAF, WICKS or
        > Aircraft Spruce
        > > catalogs etc.
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > .
        > .
        > Link to Airchair main page for archives, files and photos
        >   http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Airchairgroup/
        > .
        > Link to Mike Sandlin's BUG (Basic Ultralight Glider)
        > website
        > http://m-sandlin.info/
        > .
        > Link to Wikipedia Airchair
        > http://airchairbuild.wikidot.com/
        > .
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >     Airchairgroup-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com
        >
        >
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