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Re: Quicksilver B hangglider plans

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  • DanM
    Ken, the Quicksilver B was my first hang glider back in 1975. It was thrilling to fly in those days as the sport of hang gliding was new and it performed
    Message 1 of 24 , Nov 1, 2011
      Ken, the Quicksilver B was my first hang glider back in 1975.
      It was thrilling to fly in those days as the sport of hang gliding was new and it performed admirably.
      I'll never forget my first soaring flights on it.
      BUT.. I ended up flying it only about 20 times total before scrapping it, and here's why:

      It requires a ground crew to launch, at least a tailrunner, plus two side wire guys if there's any wind.
      The transport rack is huge and cumbersome.
      The setup is awkward and troublesome.
      Speed range is very limited, no faster than 30mph typically.
      Landing flare is difficult, due to little flare authority.
      You can't carry it yourself without dragging the tail across the ground.

      Fortunately, flex wings have evolved to very efficient aircraft such that they have none of the drawbacks listed above. For example, the Wills Wing Falcon 225 is not only lighter, easier to transport, land and launch, but also performs much better in glide, sink rate, and speed range, and lands easily. And it will carry 275 pounds of pilot easily. In fact, a 400 pound guy could fly it fine.. a good used one can be had for $500 or less... And many other heavy guy flex wing gliders are available today.

      Sorry to "pile on", but building and flying the Quicksilver B hang glider, or some scaled up version thereof, is a very bad idea.. and this coming from a guy who loves the design as much as anyone. It has historic value.. little else.


      --- In Airchairgroup@yahoogroups.com, "Ken" <kwallacewarner@...> wrote:
      >
      > Thank you
      > I mostly lurk on the group, and haven't flown in 20 years - but the discussion here has often inspired me.
      > I remember watching the Quiksilver fly in the late 70s, and am very tempted to see about building something, beefed up a bit for a pilot in the 275 range.
      >
      > Warm regards
      > Ken
    • Riley
      I d have to agree with Dan. I built and flew 2 Quicksilver B s when Eipper first came out with a kit. I think it was about 1972. It consisted of a sail,
      Message 2 of 24 , Nov 1, 2011
        I'd have to agree with Dan.  I built and flew 2 Quicksilver B's when Eipper first came out with a "kit."  I think it was about 1972.  It consisted of a sail, and raw tubing and hardware.  We cut and drilled tubing, swaged cables, and even had the airframes anodized.  I loved the glider, and have many great memories.  I still have a brass scale model of a "B" hanging in my living room.
         
        Later on I built and flew a couple of Teratons.......actually it was called Motorized Gliders of Iowa at the time.  They supplied you with Quicksilver kits from Eipper (actually a model E with more wing area) and a KT-100S Yamaha, belt drive, and prop.  They were taildraggers, with tall  spoked main wheels and suspension.  Later, Eipper quit selling airframes to them, so the changed the name to Motorized Gliders of Iowa and built the airframes themselves (shameless ripoffs.)  Remember, in the early Ultralight and Hang Gliding days, "R&D" meant "Ripoff and Duplicate."   Embarrassed smile emoticon
         
        I enjoyed those machines immensely.  All that said, there are much better ways to go today, as Dan said.  If you want a good hang glider, there are many out there on the used market that would be superior. If you want an Airchair, the GOAT is the answer.  If you want a powered Ultralight, building a Quicksilver B would be very disappointing.  Too small a wing area, and a lot of design work for a poor result.  There are many good trikes these days, or just find yourself a used MX or one of many closely related variations.  You will save both money and time, and have a more enjoyable flying experience.
         
        But, if you just want to build a B for its own sake, who can argue?  Heck, people have gone to immense trouble to build replicas of the worst flying machine that ever flew........  The 1903 Wright Flyer.
         
        Gary
         


        From: DanM
        Sent: Tuesday, November 01, 2011 9:13 AM
        Subject: [Airchairgroup] Re: Quicksilver B hangglider plans

        Ken, the Quicksilver B was my first hang glider back in 1975.
        It was thrilling to fly in those days as the sport of hang gliding was new and it performed admirably.
        I'll never forget my first soaring flights on it.
        BUT.. I ended up flying it only about 20 times total before scrapping it, and here's why:

        It requires a ground crew to launch, at least a tailrunner, plus two side wire guys if there's any wind.
        The transport rack is huge and cumbersome.
        The setup is awkward and troublesome.
        Speed range is very limited, no faster than 30mph typically.
        Landing flare is difficult, due to little flare authority.
        You can't carry it yourself without dragging the tail across the ground.
          
        Fortunately, flex wings have evolved to very efficient aircraft such that they have none of the drawbacks listed above.  For example, the Wills Wing Falcon 225 is not only lighter, easier to transport, land and launch, but also performs much better in glide, sink rate, and speed range, and lands easily.  And it will carry 275 pounds of pilot easily. In fact, a 400 pound guy could fly it fine.. a good used one can be had for $500 or less... And many other heavy guy flex wing gliders are available today.

        Sorry to "pile on", but building and flying the Quicksilver B hang glider, or some scaled up version thereof, is a very bad idea.. and this coming from a guy who loves the design as much as anyone.  It has historic value.. little else. 


        --- In Airchairgroup@yahoogroups.com, "Ken" <kwallacewarner@...> wrote:
        >
        > Thank you
        > I
        mostly lurk on the group, and haven't flown in 20 years - but the discussion here has often inspired me.
        > I remember watching the Quiksilver fly in
        the late 70s, and am very tempted to see about building something, beefed up a bit for a pilot in the 275 range.
        >
        > Warm regards
        >
        Ken



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      • Jim
        I gotta ask! Anyone have a Will s Wing 225 for sale? I m looking for one.....Jim ... -- No Cain = No gain!
        Message 3 of 24 , Nov 1, 2011
          I gotta ask! Anyone have a Will's Wing 225 for sale?
          I'm looking for one.....Jim

          DanM wrote:
           

          Ken, the Quicksilver B was my first hang glider back in 1975.
          It was thrilling to fly in those days as the sport of hang gliding was new and it performed admirably.
          I'll never forget my first soaring flights on it.
          BUT.. I ended up flying it only about 20 times total before scrapping it, and here's why:

          It requires a ground crew to launch, at least a tailrunner, plus two side wire guys if there's any wind.
          The transport rack is huge and cumbersome.
          The setup is awkward and troublesome.
          Speed range is very limited, no faster than 30mph typically.
          Landing flare is difficult, due to little flare authority.
          You can't carry it yourself without dragging the tail across the ground.

          Fortunately, flex wings have evolved to very efficient aircraft such that they have none of the drawbacks listed above. For example, the Wills Wing Falcon 225 is not only lighter, easier to transport, land and launch, but also performs much better in glide, sink rate, and speed range, and lands easily. And it will carry 275 pounds of pilot easily. In fact, a 400 pound guy could fly it fine.. a good used one can be had for $500 or less... And many other heavy guy flex wing gliders are available today.

          Sorry to "pile on", but building and flying the Quicksilver B hang glider, or some scaled up version thereof, is a very bad idea.. and this coming from a guy who loves the design as much as anyone. It has historic value.. little else.

          --- In Airchairgroup@yahoogroups.com, "Ken" <kwallacewarner@...> wrote:
          >
          > Thank you
          > I mostly lurk on the group, and haven't flown in 20 years - but the discussion here has often inspired me.
          > I remember watching the Quiksilver fly in the late 70s, and am very tempted to see about building something, beefed up a bit for a pilot in the 275 range.
          >
          > Warm regards
          > Ken


          --
          No Cain = No gain!
        • red
          Jim, Talk to these guys. Lots of HG experience hangs out, there. http://www.hanggliding.org/ Cheers, Red ... From: Airchairgroup@yahoogroups.com
          Message 4 of 24 , Nov 1, 2011
            Message
            Jim,
               
                Talk to these guys.  Lots of HG experience "hangs out," there.
               
               
            Cheers,
            Red
                 
             -----Original Message-----
            From: Airchairgroup@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Airchairgroup@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jim
            Sent: Tuesday, November 01, 2011 9:59 AM
            To: Airchairgroup@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [Airchairgroup] Re: Quicksilver B hangglider plans

            I gotta ask! Anyone have a Will's Wing 225 for sale?
            I'm looking for one.....Jim

            DanM wrote:
            Fortunately, flex wings have evolved to very efficient aircraft such that they have none of the drawbacks listed above. For example, the Wills Wing Falcon 225 is not only lighter, easier to transport, land and launch, but also performs much better in glide, sink rate, and speed range, and lands easily. And it will carry 275 pounds of pilot easily. In fact, a 400 pound guy could fly it fine.. a good used one can be had for $500 or less... And many other heavy guy flex wing gliders are available today.

            Sorry to "pile on", but building and flying the Quicksilver B hang glider, or some scaled up version thereof, is a very bad idea.. and this coming from a guy who loves the design as much as anyone. It has historic value.. little else.
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