Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Presenting the Stringister (and High-Speed Blocks note)

Expand Messages
  • dave santos
    Blocks are an essential rigging element allowing rope to mechanically perform all the same basic logic operations as electronics. We now see transister logic
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 22, 2013
      Blocks are an essential rigging element allowing rope to mechanically perform all the same basic logic operations as electronics. We now see transister logic in the heddles of a Jaquard Loom (the direct inspiration for Babbage's invention of the digital computer, but in clockwork). The tri-tether and simple pulley tackle are close analogs. Lets call the "new" phonon-based devices "Stringisters", as a public domain generic term.

      KiteLab Austin is currently using COTS high-speed blocks from sailboat racing and professional zipline markets for AWES rope-drives. We had bought a selection of human-rated climbing blocks, but it seems clear that we should reserve these for manlifting, and use the sailing blocks for flexible high performance rigging (comparable to high-voltage high-frequency electronics), where human factors are not the design driver.

      How fast can high-speed blocks go? The world's fastest zipline in Wales claims 99mph, fast enough to give hope that the theoretic rope-drive sweet spot of around 300mph (at lower-altitudes, more higher) can be achieved. The limiting factor is heat dissipation of the bearings. For now, ball bearings are fine, but gas or magnetic bearings are options as higher speeds are someday sought.

      -------------Coining "Stringister"---------------

      Very rare that a useful 10 character natural neologism has zero hits, not even a typo or random string (computer-sci pun) hit...

      Google-

      "Your search - "stringister" - did not match any documents."

      Note- Forgot to mention that Ed Sapir's grandfather, Edward Sapir, was the Father of Modern Linguistics, which lead to modern semantics, so Ed is a key part of the Semantic AWE circle. Joe Faust is also one of the alpha word-freaks crafting the AWE lexicon.





    • Joe Faust
      Do you want one or both: stringisters or stringistors to follow the transistors ?
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 22, 2013
        Do you want one or both:
        stringisters
        or
        stringistors

        to follow the "transistors"
        ?
      • dave santos
        Yes, Stringistor is better, and i always used transistor, but somehow misread Wikipedia usages, and jumped to minority spelling. We now need to classify the
        Message 3 of 7 , Apr 22, 2013
          Yes, Stringistor is better, and i always used transistor, but somehow misread Wikipedia usages, and jumped to minority spelling.

          We now need to classify the rest of our rigging to harmonize with electronics usage, to empower logic designers in the new rigging.


          ======== note to Doug's  ""Flo" as Symptomatic" thesis ===========


          "Flow" next to "Turbine" is hardly a sure mark of a bad turbine, since "Axial Flow Turbine" and many variant "Flow Turbine" usages represent high technical achievement. Doug should note that Dutch for "flow" is "stroom", and that "flu" after all is closer to the Latin root as "fluid", as used in Fluidics. If his riff on "Flow Turbines" was an attempt at humor, it was not apparent.

        • Doug
          Well hmph! :))) I m talking brand names of improved turbines. People who have not witnessed this parade of funny turbines don t see the humor.
          Message 4 of 7 , Apr 22, 2013
            Well hmph! :))) I'm talking brand names of "improved" turbines.
            People who have not witnessed this parade of funny turbines don't see the humor.


            > ======== note to Doug's  ""Flo" as Symptomatic" thesis ===========
            >
            >
            > "Flow" next to "Turbine" is hardly a sure mark of a bad turbine, since "Axial Flow Turbine" and many variant "Flow Turbine" usages represent high technical achievement. Doug should note that Dutch for "flow" is "stroom", and that "flu" after
            > all is closer to the Latin root as "fluid", as used in Fluidics. If his riff on "Flow Turbines" was an attempt at humor, it was not apparent.
            >
          • Doug
            P.S. Last I remember Dave S. was promoting the Honeywell Rooftop turbine as a good innovation, after seeing a non-operational example that had already burned
            Message 5 of 7 , Apr 23, 2013
              P.S. Last I remember Dave S. was promoting the Honeywell Rooftop turbine as a good innovation, after seeing a non-operational example that had already burned out in the first decent wind. This is what I mean by how extreme the lack of understanding in wind energy is, which explains why Professor crackpot is still able to repeat DuhVinci's mistakes after 500 years.

              The fact that you can actually LOOK directly AT a brand new turbine that has already BURNED OUT, that DOESN'T WORK, then promote it as a great innovation while arguing with the idea that overspeed protection is the main challenge in wind energy, just goes to show you that this field is mostly idle speculations by know-nothings. In your case, you CHOOSE to know nothing in the face of being shown the facts. It's OK, we in wind energy are used to it.

              I pass along my long-time observation that any turbines that use the word "flo" usually suck. You of course counter my statement, and say instead that they are great! That is your daily "firehose of ignorance". So if you are so smart and so right, where are your counterexamples? Where are your good turbines that use the word "flo" in the name? Come on Dave, we're waiting for you to finish showing everyone your vast extent of knowledge. And like all trouble-maker wannabe newbie would-be wind energy inventors, you will have no answer to any pertinent or pointed question - just more name-calling and trouble-making. Why not just lay on your back and wave your arms and legs and scream?

              --- In AirborneWindEnergy@yahoogroups.com, "Doug" <dougselsam@...> wrote:
              >
              > Well hmph! :))) I'm talking brand names of "improved" turbines.
              > People who have not witnessed this parade of funny turbines don't see the humor.
              >
              >
              > > ======== note to Doug's  ""Flo" as Symptomatic" thesis ===========
              > >
              > >
              > > "Flow" next to "Turbine" is hardly a sure mark of a bad turbine, since "Axial Flow Turbine" and many variant "Flow Turbine" usages represent high technical achievement. Doug should note that Dutch for "flow" is "stroom", and that "flu" after
              > > all is closer to the Latin root as "fluid", as used in Fluidics. If his riff on "Flow Turbines" was an attempt at humor, it was not apparent.
              > >
              >
            • Joe Faust
              Stringistor logic and control for mothra trap deployment switching in all wind angles by Rod Read, April 23, 2013
              Message 6 of 7 , Apr 23, 2013
              • Doug
                Wow you sound increasingly insane - but I know it is all quantum stuff, way over our heads. In the far future, people will realize what a visionary you were.
                Message 7 of 7 , Apr 24, 2013
                  Wow you sound increasingly insane - but I know it is all quantum stuff, way over our heads. In the far future, people will realize what a visionary you were. Meanwhile, speaking of making up words like "stringisters" I will share a word-origin story: Like most people, I was barraged by daily e-mails from Nigeria, promising 50 million dollars, popularly known as "The Nigerian Scam". I tried writing back a few times and even got a couple phone calls from someone I called "General Maboomba". I thought "Maboomba" would be a good name for it. So I googled "Maboomba" and got back 2 hits. I immediately registered the domain "maboomba.com" and started throwing around the word "Maboomba" in my postings, just to see if I could get a new word going. Google "maboomba" today: About 714,000 results (0.36 seconds)
                  :)
                  Maboomba to you on this wonderful day!
                  PS haven't you heard? "Stringisters" is the name of an all-girl Country Band: unmarried sisters playing stringed instruments.
                  And of course "Stringistors" are the fans!

                  --- In AirborneWindEnergy@yahoogroups.com, dave santos <santos137@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Blocks are an essential rigging element allowing rope to mechanically perform all the same basic logic operations as electronics. We now see transister logic in the heddles of a Jaquard Loom (the direct inspiration for Babbage's invention of the digital computer, but in clockwork). The tri-tether and simple pulley tackle are close analogs. Lets call the "new" phonon-based devices "Stringisters", as a public domain generic term.
                  >
                  >
                  > KiteLab Austin is currently using COTS high-speed blocks from sailboat racing and professional zipline markets for AWES rope-drives. We had bought a selection of human-rated climbing blocks, but it seems clear that we should reserve these for manlifting, and use the sailing blocks for flexible high performance rigging (comparable to high-voltage high-frequency electronics), where human factors are not the design driver.
                  >
                  > How fast can high-speed blocks go? The world's fastest zipline in Wales claims 99mph, fast enough to give hope that the theoretic rope-drive sweet spot of around 300mph (at lower-altitudes, more higher) can be achieved. The limiting factor is heat dissipation of the bearings. For now, ball bearings are fine, but gas or magnetic bearings are options as higher speeds are someday sought.
                  >
                  > -------------Coining "Stringister"---------------
                  >
                  > Very rare that a useful 10 character natural neologism has zero hits, not even a typo or random string (computer-sci pun) hit...
                  >
                  > Google-
                  >
                  > "Your search - "stringister" - did not match any documents."
                  >
                  > Note- Forgot to mention that Ed Sapir's grandfather, Edward Sapir, was the Father of Modern Linguistics, which lead to modern semantics, so Ed is a key part of the Semantic AWE circle. Joe Faust is also one of the alpha word-freaks crafting the AWE lexicon.
                  >
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.