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Kite Interference Theorem //Re: [AWES] Re: Long stroke twinned kites

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  • dave santos
      Rod asked- Why do the tethers need to be widely spaced? There is an early KiteLab Kite Interference Theorem- If the scope of  neighboring kites overlaps,
    Message 1 of 8 , Jan 9, 2013

       
      Rod asked- "Why do the tethers need to be widely spaced?"


      There is an early KiteLab Kite Interference Theorem- If the scope of  neighboring kites overlaps, then eventually the kites will interfere, despite controls (Loosely- "If they can interfere, they will interfere.").

      Some AWES Farm design teams understand this, and design fully spaced kite cells, others worry about sprawl, and hope that some overlap is allowable. Neither approach is optimal.

      The true solution is to cross-link kites aloft to constrain them more deterministically (arches, meshes, and 3D lattices). This approach emerged from Kite Showmen, Dave Gomberg and Peter Lynn, needing to do major international kite shows in often crowded spaces. They got tired of interference and learned to string their large theme kites on short leaders along an arch line set aloft, such that the kites cannot cross each other.

      Interfering kites saw at each others' lines, causing runaway kites. Runaway is the worst historical kite failure-mode, since major damage can be caused at great distances from the kite field. Railroads, shipping, power-grids, and communications have all been knocked out in the past by runaway kites.



    • roderickjosephread
      Beautifully put thanks Dave S
      Message 2 of 8 , Jan 9, 2013
        Beautifully put thanks Dave S

        --- In AirborneWindEnergy@yahoogroups.com, dave santos wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        > �
        > Rod asked- "Why do the tethers need to be widely spaced?"
        >
        >
        > There is an early KiteLab Kite Interference Theorem- If the scope of �neighboring kites overlaps, then eventually the kites will interfere, despite controls (Loosely- "If they can interfere, they will interfere.").
        >
        > Some AWES Farm design teams understand this, and design fully spaced kite cells, others worry about sprawl, and hope that some overlap is allowable. Neither approach is optimal.
        >
        > The true solution is to cross-link kites aloft to constrain them more deterministically (arches, meshes, and 3D lattices). This approach emerged from Kite Showmen, Dave Gomberg and Peter Lynn, needing to do major international kite shows in often crowded spaces. They got tired of interference and learned to string their large theme kites on short leaders along an arch line set aloft, such that the kites cannot cross each other.
        >
        > Interfering kites saw at each others' lines, causing runaway kites. Runaway is the worst historical kite failure-mode, since major damage can be caused at great distances from the kite field. Railroads, shipping, power-grids, and communications have all been knocked out in the past by runaway kites.
        >
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