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Preforated Ribbon-Wings flown from Sprockets

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  • dave santos
    Ribbon wings are cheap and simple, with many known instances in AWES design. A basic improvement in handling ribbon wings is to perforate the leading and
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 7, 2013
      Ribbon wings are cheap and simple, with many known instances in AWES design. A basic improvement in handling ribbon wings is to perforate the leading and trailing edges with sprocket holes, so as to better handle them mechanically, just as perforated motion-picture film is processed by sprocketed rollers in cameras or projectors. We have long considered rollers to handle ribbon wings, and adding sprockets is just a next natural step.

      Recall that Ron Welty around 2009 envisioned a ribbon-like fabric ladder-mill made of collapsible wind pockets on looped belt. Since then, the idea of a "sideways" (crosswind arched) laddermill has caught on. Sprocketed versions of Welty Mills could be a real AWES contender.

      Notes-

      -Endless ribbon wings would be "roll-stock" fabric, a most potent COTS.

      -The holes would act as turbulators, enhancing the single-skin wing's flying properties.

      -Holes meshed on sprocket teeth keep roll-stock from slipping or folding at rollers.

      -Well tuned ribbon arches can be set from roller sprockets specially angled. Roller geometry can be conical to allow for proper wing tuning.

      -Each "frame" on the roll could be a crosswind kixel, so the "film" is driven crosswind, as the AWES working principle.

      --------------------------------

      Expect a dinky proof-of-concept demo soon, with an aim to show continuous toothed circulation as a crosswind Welty mill.


      CC BY NC SA
       



    • roderickjosephread
      Also useful would be individually controllable front and back sprockets.. e.g. where sprocket holes help a ribbon(hold to, align to or run along) load paths
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 7, 2013
        Also useful would be individually controllable front and back sprockets.. e.g.
        where sprocket holes help a ribbon(hold to, align to or run along) load paths (front and back or (up and downwind))
        and where the loadpaths have variable geometry, (the back can shrink compared to the front for overall L/D changes)
        The ribbon becomes the arch.
        and if it has driving pockets on it for a top arch and a lower arch say... you can build variable geometry continuous driving arch sets with a band driving around them.

        smart


        --- In AirborneWindEnergy@yahoogroups.com, dave santos wrote:
        >
        > Ribbon wings are cheap and simple, with many known instances in AWES design. A basic improvement in handling ribbon wings is to perforate the leading and trailing edges with sprocket holes, so as to better handle them mechanically, just as perforated motion-picture film is processed by sprocketed rollers in cameras or projectors. We have long considered rollers to handle ribbon wings, and adding sprockets is just a next natural step.
        >
        > Recall that Ron Welty around 2009 envisioned a ribbon-like fabric ladder-mill made of collapsible wind pockets on looped belt. Since then, the idea of a "sideways" (crosswind arched) laddermill has caught on. Sprocketed versions of Welty Mills could be a real AWES contender.
        >
        > Notes-
        >
        > -Endless ribbon wings would be "roll-stock" fabric, a most potent COTS.
        >
        > -The holes would act as turbulators, enhancing the single-skin wing's flying properties.
        >
        > -Holes meshed on sprocket teeth keep roll-stock from slipping or folding at rollers.
        >
        > -Well tuned ribbon�arches can be set from roller sprockets specially angled. Roller geometry can be conical to allow for proper wing tuning.
        >
        > -Each "frame" on the roll could be a crosswind kixel, so the "film" is driven crosswind, as the AWES working principle.
        >
        > --------------------------------
        >
        > Expect a dinky proof-of-concept demo soon, with an aim to show continuous toothed circulation as a crosswind Welty mill.
        >
        >
        > CC BY NC SA
        >
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