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Quasi-Planar Isotropism with Square TarpKites (Kixels)

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  • dave santos
    It is proposed that megascale kite arrays need not rotate to accept wind from any direction, but can merely tilt away from the wind direction for a suitable
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 20, 2012
      It is proposed that megascale kite arrays need not rotate to accept wind from any direction, but can merely tilt away from the wind direction for a suitable overall AoA.  If such a megascale array is made up of a rope loadpath latticework with many "tarplike" squares of untailored fabric, then each square can be passively manipulated to present the optimal minimal surface geometry, for best power, and to resist flapping and luff. Squares are of course a standard COTS tarp format, here preferred for a higher rotational symmetry over rectangles. These pixel-like squares of fabric are hereby dubbed "Kixels", as a specific kite method.
       
      Each Kixel needs to gather its downwind corner or corners so as to pressurize the lower surface. There are two characteristic phases for our square sails. The first was recently demonstrated; the tarp is "square" to the wind, and the two trailing corners curl down. The second characteristic phase is where the square is diagonal (as a diamond) to the wind, and only its single rear corner curls down. Its not hard to see that there are many ways to rig Kixels to passively tune into the right geometry as the entire "metakite" tilts round the compass. Another passive function available is self-furling in high winds, much as a leaf does.
       
      Kixels might be an ultimate basis for filling the sky with cheap kite structure.
       
      coolIP
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