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Re: [AWES] Re: Summary History of Spread Anchor Kite Systems

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  • Joe Faust
    Some notes on more than one line to airborne aircraft to moorings that are soil moored, vehicle moored, free-falling mooring operating, powered-aircraft
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 5, 2012
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      Some notes on "more than one line" to airborne aircraft to moorings that are soil moored, vehicle moored, free-falling mooring operating, powered-aircraft moored: 

      1. The gliding kite that is the manned canopy paraglider hang glider has many lines to its system's mooring (the set of masses: pilot, harness, instruments). The many lines from the wing often are gathered to 8 or risers; then those risers are two spread sets attaching to the falling mooring of the kited wing. 

      2. Balloons and blimps frequently have many lines to earthed anchors (heavy anchor, and some man-as-anchor for control lines) 

      3. Large manned kites in hang glider training frequently use two lines by instructors to the kited wing. 

      4. For safety, anchor lines of various sorts are used in kiting (kill lines, control lines, main-lift-reaction line).  Kiteboarders use two to five lines.  Kitebuggy use two or more lines. 

      5. Sport kiting festivals see the two-line control kites, the two-line rotary ribbon kites, the two-line arch kites. 

      6. Second anchor line for safe downing of large kites is often recommended. 

      I hope someone enter comment to FAA to get multiple lines approved!     
      Fugitive kites, even small kites are hazards to people and property.  
      Secondary anchor lines for downing breakaways seems fundamentally important. 
    • dave santos
      Doug,   It very encouraging that you are finally beginning to absorb aviation rules, but you need to bemore precise and accurate in attempting in to
      Message 2 of 7 , Jan 5, 2012
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        Doug,
         
        It very encouraging that you are finally beginning to absorb aviation rules, but you need to be more precise and accurate in attempting in to technically summarize the issues (to avoid a result like your NASA Primer on AWE earned)-
         
        1) Multi-anchors are not new but ancient.
        2) Aviation regs are already made. Airspace rules already apply to AWE. Making better rules is ongoing.
        3) The latest FAA circular are not the "first rules" nor does it "prohibit" anything ("FAA requests"), nor even mention "multiple anchor points".
        4) A "temporary ban" is possible, but purely hypothethical, and, yes, would favor those already expert in temporarily restricted methods. Gov-created advantage is not "good" in itself (unless one is selfish like, say, a patent troll).
        5) Rule changes are common and often reflect exact aviation community desires. The LSA category is a great model (Kiteflying was even once banned in NYC Central Park, and kiters got the rule changed.). If you read more carefully, you know we are working internationally, so its not like the FAA can stop the world if they ever do start making unreasonable rules.
         
        Engaging in childish name-calling on the "pro" AWE Forum is a sad substitute for more intelligent input!
         
        daveS
         

         
          
      • Doug
        Dave S. In my brief skimming of the latest nonsense, I noted a reference to AWE systems being restricted to only a single anchor point. I just told you about
        Message 3 of 7 , Jan 6, 2012
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          Dave S.
          In my brief skimming of the latest nonsense, I noted a reference to AWE systems being restricted to only a single anchor point. I just told you about it as one might politely notify a blindfolded bicyclist that he was about to go over a cliff. :)

          --- In AirborneWindEnergy@yahoogroups.com, dave santos <santos137@...> wrote: ("FAA requests"), nor even mention "multiple anchor points".
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