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Oscillating-Wing Power Generator by Kevin Jones || wingmill

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  • Joe Faust
    Oscillating-Wing Power Generator Offer: That replies to this thread or topic be with a focus the study made by Kevin D. Jones and Scott Davids. I also invite
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 28, 2009
      Oscillating-Wing Power Generator

      Offer:
      That replies to this thread or topic be with a focus the study made by Kevin D. Jones and Scott Davids. I also invite that the discussion enter the reference to wingmill studies by McKinney and DeLaurier. Then perhaps some of us will bring in a discussion of the flipper-wing of Dave Santos, if such is cousin to the wingmill of the subject paper.

      Jones, K.D., Davids, S. and Platzer, M.F.,
      "Oscillating-Wing Power Generator,"
      ASME/JSME Joint Fluids Engineering Conference,
      San Francisco, CA, July 18-23, 1999.

      Full copy of the six page paper:
      http://aa.nps.edu/~jones/publications/pdf/asmefedsm99-7050.pdf
      or the same link made into a Tiny URL:
      http://tinyurl.com/OscillatingWingPowerGeneration

      ABSTRACT
      Numerical and experimental methods are described for the
      investigation of an oscillating-wing generator or wingmill. The
      numerical approach applies a previously developed, unsteady, in-
      compressible panel method incorporating a non-linear, deform-
      ing wake model to compute the unsteady flow about an airfoil
      undergoing specified pitch and plunge motions. An experimental
      model is described which can duplicate much of the parameter-
      space available to the panel method. Numerical results are pre-
      sented demonstrating configurations that yield high efficiencies.
      Results are compared to the wingmill experiments of McKinney
      and DeLaurier.
    • Joe Faust
      Dave Santos confirmed to me that wingmill is cousin to FlipWing and that wingmill continues to be studied by others (references soon). Meanwhile several years
      Message 2 of 7 , Mar 29, 2009
        Dave Santos confirmed to me that wingmill is cousin to FlipWing and that wingmill continues to be studied by others (references soon). Meanwhile several years of successful FlipWing (flipper wings) field testing continue to advance at a KiteLab. Some recent drawings and photographs can be part of this thread:
        http://www.energykitesystems.net/DaveSantos/FlipWingTM/index.html
      • Joe Faust
        This will be a status dated snapshot of a relted article in Wikipedia. The article is thought to be part of this thread. It will be interesting to see later
        Message 3 of 7 , Mar 29, 2009


          This will be a status dated snapshot of a relted article in Wikipedia. The article is thought to be part of this thread. It will be interesting to see later the full develpment of that article.  All are invited to improve that article at Wikipedia.  I have not yet any inputs to that article.

          Here is today's text (anyone may edit the Wikipedia article):

          =======================Dated Snapshot=====

          Controlled aerodynamic instability phenomena

          From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

          The term controlled aerodynamic instability phenomena was first used by Cristiano Augusto Trein[1] in the Nineteenth KKCNN Symposium on Civil Engineering [2] held in Kyoto – Japan in 2006. The concept is based on the idea that aerodynamic instability phenomena, such as Kármán vortex street, flutter, galloping and buffeting, can be driven into a controlled motion and be used to extract energy from the flow, becoming an alternative approach for wind power generation systems.

          [edit] Justification

          Nowadays, when a discussion is established around the theme wind power generation, what is promptly addressed is the image of a big wind turbine, with its turbine getting turned by the wind. However, some alternative approaches have already been proposed in the latter decades, showing that the wind turbine is not the only possibility for the exploitation of the wind for power generation purposes.

          In 1977 Jeffery [3] experimented with an oscillating aerofoil system based on a vertically-mounted pivoting wing which flapped in the wind. Farthing[4] discovered that this free flutter could automatically cease for high wind protection and developed floating and pile based models for pumping surface and well water as well as compressing air with auxiliary battery charging McKinney and DeLaurier [5] in 1981 proposed a system called wingmill, based on a rigid horizontal airfoil with articulated pitching and plunging to extract energy from the flow. This system has stimulated Moores[6] in 2003 to conduct further investigations on applications of such idea.

          Following the same trend, other studies have already been carried out, for example the flutter power generation system proposed by Isogai et al.[7] in 2003, which uses the flutter instability caused by the wind on an aerofoil to extract energy from the flow. In this branch, Matsumoto et al. [8] went further, proposing enhancements for that system and assessing the feasibility of its usage with bluff bodies.

          [edit] Controlled aerodynamic instability phenomena

          The wind interacts with the obstacles it reaches in its way by transferring a part of its energy to those interactions, which are converted into forces over the bodies, leading them to different levels of motion, which are directly dependent on their aeroelastic and geometric characteristics. A large amount of studies and researches has been conducted concerning these interactions and their dependencies, aiming the understanding of the aerodynamic phenomena that arise due to them, such as the Kármán vortex street, galloping, buffeting and flutter, mainly regarding bluff bodies. By the understanding of such phenomena it is possible to predict instabilities and their consequent motions, feeding the designers with the data they need in order to arrange the structures properly.

          In the great majority of the cases – e.g.: in civil buildings – such motions are useless and undesirable, in a manner that all the designing approaches are focused on avoiding them. However these instabilities may also be used in a profitable manner: if they are controlled and driven to a predictable motion, they can provide mechanical power supply to run, for example, turbines, machinery and electricity generators.

          So by using the knowledge acquired by now regarding those aerodynamic instabilities and by developing new features, it is possible to propose ways to stimulate them to an optimal state, using them for power generation purposes. That way, alternative approaches to the windmill may be proposed and developed. Farthing (www.econologica.org/pt.htm) applies the practical requirements for a windmill to greatly whittle down the possibilities.

          [edit] References an notes

          1. ^ http://www.cristianotrein.com
          2. ^ Matsumoto, M.; Trein, C.; Ito, Y.; Okubo, K.; Matsumiya, H.; Kim, G.; "Controlled Aerodynamic Instability Phenomena - An Alternative Approach for Wind Power Generation Systems", The Nineteenth KKCNN Symposium on Civil Engineering, Japan, 2006.,
          3. ^ Jeffery, J; "Oscillating Aerofoil Project", Report from the Pocklington School Design Centre, West Green, Pocklington, York, England., 1977.
          4. ^ http://www.econologica.org/wingedmills.html
          5. ^ McKinney, W; DeLaurier, J; "The Wingmill: An Oscillating-Wing Windmill", Journal of Energy vol 5, n°2, pp.109-115., 1981.
          6. ^ Moores, J.; " Potential Flow - 2-Dimensional Vortex Panel Model: Applications to Wingmills", Applied Sciences Bachelor Thesis, Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering – University of Toronto, Canada, 2003.
          7. ^ Isogai, K.; Yamasaki, M.; Matsubara, M.; Asaoka, T.; "Design Study of Elastically Supported Flapping Wing Power Generator", Proceedings of International Forum on Aeroelasticity and Structural Dynamics, Amsterdam, 2003.
          8. ^ Matsumoto, M.; Mizuno; K., Okubo, K.; Ito, Y.; Kim, G.; "Fundamental Study on Flutter Generation System", The Eighteenth KKCNN Symposium on Civil Engineering, Taiwan, 2005.

          =====================End of dated snapshot==

        • w.roeseler@comcast.net
          Thousands of these devises already generating power in the third world, thanks to a young inventor whose name escapes me just now. ... From: Joe Faust
          Message 4 of 7 , Mar 29, 2009

            Thousands of these devises already generating power in the third world, thanks to a young inventor whose name escapes me just now.

             


            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Joe Faust" <joefaust333@...>
            To: AirborneWindEnergy@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Sunday, March 29, 2009 8:42:07 AM GMT -08:00 US/Canada Pacific
            Subject: [AirborneWindEnergy] Re: Oscillating-Wing Power Generator  by Kevin Jones      ||   wingmill


            This will be a status dated snapshot of a relted article in Wikipedia. The article is thought to be part of this thread. It will be interesting to see later the full develpment of that article.  All are invited to improve that article at Wikipedia.  I have not yet any inputs to that article.

            Here is today's text (anyone may edit the Wikipedia article):

            =======================Dated Snapshot=====

            Controlled aerodynamic instability phenomena

            From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

            The term controlled aerodynamic instability phenomena was first used by Cristiano Augusto Trein[1] in the Nineteenth KKCNN Symposium on Civil Engineering [2] held in Kyoto – Japan in 2006. The concept is based on the idea that aerodynamic instability phenomena, such as Kármán vortex street, flutter, galloping and buffeting, can be driven into a controlled motion and be used to extract energy from the flow, becoming an alternative approach for wind power generation systems.

            [edit] Justification

            Nowadays, when a discussion is established around the theme wind power generation, what is promptly addressed is the image of a big wind turbine, with its turbine getting turned by the wind. However, some alternative approaches have already been proposed in the latter decades, showing that the wind turbine is not the only possibility for the exploitation of the wind for power generation purposes.

            In 1977 Jeffery [3] experimented with an oscillating aerofoil system based on a vertically-mounted pivoting wing which flapped in the wind. Farthing[4] discovered that this free flutter could automatically cease for high wind protection and developed floating and pile based models for pumping surface and well water as well as compressing air with auxiliary battery charging McKinney and DeLaurier [5] in 1981 proposed a system called wingmill, based on a rigid horizontal airfoil with articulated pitching and plunging to extract energy from the flow. This system has stimulated Moores[6] in 2003 to conduct further investigations on applications of such idea.

            Following the same trend, other studies have already been carried out, for example the flutter power generation system proposed by Isogai et al.[7] in 2003, which uses the flutter instability caused by the wind on an aerofoil to extract energy from the flow. In this branch, Matsumoto et al. [8] went further, proposing enhancements for that system and assessing the feasibility of its usage with bluff bodies.

            [edit] Controlled aerodynamic instability phenomena

            The wind interacts with the obstacles it reaches in its way by transferring a part of its energy to those interactions, which are converted into forces over the bodies, leading them to different levels of motion, which are directly dependent on their aeroelastic and geometric characteristics. A large amount of studies and researches has been conducted concerning these interactions and their dependencies, aiming the understanding of the aerodynamic phenomena that arise due to them, such as the Kármán vortex street, galloping, buffeting and flutter, mainly regarding bluff bodies. By the understanding of such phenomena it is possible to predict instabilities and their consequent motions, feeding the designers with the data they need in order to arrange the structures properly.

            In the great majority of the cases – e.g.: in civil buildings – such motions are useless and undesirable, in a manner that all the designing approaches are focused on avoiding them. However these instabilities may also be used in a profitable manner: if they are controlled and driven to a predictable motion, they can provide mechanical power supply to run, for example, turbines, machinery and electricity generators.

            So by using the knowledge acquired by now regarding those aerodynamic instabilities and by developing new features, it is possible to propose ways to stimulate them to an optimal state, using them for power generation purposes. That way, alternative approaches to the windmill may be proposed and developed. Farthing (www.econologica.org/pt.htm) applies the practical requirements for a windmill to greatly whittle down the possibilities.

            [edit] References an notes

            1. ^ http://www.cristianotrein.com
            2. ^ Matsumoto, M.; Trein, C.; Ito, Y.; Okubo, K.; Matsumiya, H.; Kim, G.; "Controlled Aerodynamic Instability Phenomena - An Alternative Approach for Wind Power Generation Systems", The Nineteenth KKCNN Symposium on Civil Engineering, Japan, 2006.,
            3. ^ Jeffery, J; "Oscillating Aerofoil Project", Report from the Pocklington School Design Centre, West Green, Pocklington, York, England., 1977.
            4. ^ http://www.econologica.org/wingedmills.html
            5. ^ McKinney, W; DeLaurier, J; "The Wingmill: An Oscillating-Wing Windmill", Journal of Energy vol 5, n°2, pp.109-115., 1981.
            6. ^ Moores, J.; " Potential Flow - 2-Dimensional Vortex Panel Model: Applications to Wingmills", Applied Sciences Bachelor Thesis, Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering – University of Toronto, Canada, 2003.
            7. ^ Isogai, K.; Yamasaki, M.; Matsubara, M.; Asaoka, T.; "Design Study of Elastically Supported Flapping Wing Power Generator", Proceedings of International Forum on Aeroelasticity and Structural Dynamics, Amsterdam, 2003.
            8. ^ Matsumoto, M.; Mizuno; K., Okubo, K.; Ito, Y.; Kim, G.; "Fundamental Study on Flutter Generation System", The Eighteenth KKCNN Symposium on Civil Engineering, Taiwan, 2005.

            =====================End of dated snapshot==

          • harry valentine
            I ve seen devices that meet this description attatched to roof of buildings. They re piezo-electric and are activated by wind. They deliver small amounts of
            Message 5 of 7 , Mar 30, 2009
              I've seen devices that meet this description attatched to roof of buildings. They're piezo-electric and are activated by wind. They deliver small amounts of power at higher efficiency and at less cost that small wind turbines mounted on towers.
               
              Harry

              To: AirborneWindEnergy@yahoogroups.com
              From: w.roeseler@...
              Date: Mon, 30 Mar 2009 04:24:12 +0000
              Subject: Re: [AirborneWindEnergy] Re: Oscillating-Wing Power Generator by Kevin Jones || wingmill

              Thousands of these devises already generating power in the third world, thanks to a young inventor whose name escapes me just now.
               

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "Joe Faust" <joefaust333@ gmail.com>
              To: AirborneWindEnergy@ yahoogroups. com
              Sent: Sunday, March 29, 2009 8:42:07 AM GMT -08:00 US/Canada Pacific
              Subject: [AirborneWindEnergy ] Re: Oscillating- Wing Power Generator  by Kevin Jones      ||   wingmill



              This will be a status dated snapshot of a relted article in Wikipedia. The article is thought to be part of this thread. It will be interesting to see later the full develpment of that article.  All are invited to improve that article at Wikipedia.  I have not yet any inputs to that article.
              Here is today's text (anyone may edit the Wikipedia article):
              ============ ========= ==Dated Snapshot==== =

              Controlled aerodynamic instability phenomena

              From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

              The term controlled aerodynamic instability phenomena was first used by Cristiano Augusto Trein[1] in the Nineteenth KKCNN Symposium on Civil Engineering [2] held in Kyoto – Japan in 2006. The concept is based on the idea that aerodynamic instability phenomena, such as Kármán vortex street, flutter, galloping and buffeting, can be driven into a controlled motion and be used to extract energy from the flow, becoming an alternative approach for wind power generation systems.

              [edit] Justification

              Nowadays, when a discussion is established around the theme wind power generation, what is promptly addressed is the image of a big wind turbine, with its turbine getting turned by the wind. However, some alternative approaches have already been proposed in the latter decades, showing that the wind turbine is not the only possibility for the exploitation of the wind for power generation purposes.
              In 1977 Jeffery [3] experimented with an oscillating aerofoil system based on a vertically-mounted pivoting wing which flapped in the wind. Farthing[4] discovered that this free flutter could automatically cease for high wind protection and developed floating and pile based models for pumping surface and well water as well as compressing air with auxiliary battery charging McKinney and DeLaurier [5] in 1981 proposed a system called wingmill, based on a rigid horizontal airfoil with articulated pitching and plunging to extract energy from the flow. This system has stimulated Moores[6] in 2003 to conduct further investigations on applications of such idea.
              Following the same trend, other studies have already been carried out, for example the flutter power generation system proposed by Isogai et al.[7] in 2003, which uses the flutter instability caused by the wind on an aerofoil to extract energy from the flow. In this branch, Matsumoto et al. [8] went further, proposing enhancements for that system and assessing the feasibility of its usage with bluff bodies.

              [edit] Controlled aerodynamic instability phenomena

              The wind interacts with the obstacles it reaches in its way by transferring a part of its energy to those interactions, which are converted into forces over the bodies, leading them to different levels of motion, which are directly dependent on their aeroelastic and geometric characteristics. A large amount of studies and researches has been conducted concerning these interactions and their dependencies, aiming the understanding of the aerodynamic phenomena that arise due to them, such as the Kármán vortex street, galloping, buffeting and flutter, mainly regarding bluff bodies. By the understanding of such phenomena it is possible to predict instabilities and their consequent motions, feeding the designers with the data they need in order to arrange the structures properly.
              In the great majority of the cases – e.g.: in civil buildings – such motions are useless and undesirable, in a manner that all the designing approaches are focused on avoiding them. However these instabilities may also be used in a profitable manner: if they are controlled and driven to a predictable motion, they can provide mechanical power supply to run, for example, turbines, machinery and electricity generators.
              So by using the knowledge acquired by now regarding those aerodynamic instabilities and by developing new features, it is possible to propose ways to stimulate them to an optimal state, using them for power generation purposes. That way, alternative approaches to the windmill may be proposed and developed. Farthing (www.econologica. org/pt.htm) applies the practical requirements for a windmill to greatly whittle down the possibilities.

              [edit] References an notes

              1. ^ http://www.cristian otrein.com
              2. ^ Matsumoto, M.; Trein, C.; Ito, Y.; Okubo, K.; Matsumiya, H.; Kim, G.; "Controlled Aerodynamic Instability Phenomena - An Alternative Approach for Wind Power Generation Systems", The Nineteenth KKCNN Symposium on Civil Engineering, Japan, 2006.,
              3. ^ Jeffery, J; "Oscillating Aerofoil Project", Report from the Pocklington School Design Centre, West Green, Pocklington, York, England., 1977.
              4. ^ http://www.econolog ica.org/wingedmi lls.html
              5. ^ McKinney, W; DeLaurier, J; "The Wingmill: An Oscillating- Wing Windmill", Journal of Energy vol 5, n°2, pp.109-115., 1981.
              6. ^ Moores, J.; " Potential Flow - 2-Dimensional Vortex Panel Model: Applications to Wingmills", Applied Sciences Bachelor Thesis, Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering – University of Toronto, Canada, 2003.
              7. ^ Isogai, K.; Yamasaki, M.; Matsubara, M.; Asaoka, T.; "Design Study of Elastically Supported Flapping Wing Power Generator", Proceedings of International Forum on Aeroelasticity and Structural Dynamics, Amsterdam, 2003.
              8. ^ Matsumoto, M.; Mizuno; K., Okubo, K.; Ito, Y.; Kim, G.; "Fundamental Study on Flutter Generation System", The Eighteenth KKCNN Symposium on Civil Engineering, Taiwan, 2005.
              ============ ========= End of dated snapshot==




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            • Joe Faust
              Bill, In support of your mention, I notice that: Assuming de-construction of trees, de-leafing of fall season trees, leveling of old houses, putting out of
              Message 6 of 7 , Mar 30, 2009
                Bill,
                In support of your mention, I notice that:
                Assuming de-construction of trees, de-leafing of fall season trees, leveling of old houses, putting out of commission poorly desinged airplanes, etc. are instance of work done, then flutter and buffet have been doing tremendous work every day around the world for millions on years. The wind's energy enters structures tether or not and frequently sets up oscillations that result in tearing apart structures until...with other processes, soil is made and enriched so new plants may be nourished. Capturing some of that flutter for making-energy-sake or for performing presecribed work would simple be receiving the gift of wind's flutter-induction capacity in a channeled manner for designed non-random purposes. Rapid Airborne Development (RAD) very well may have a large branch that capitalizes on flutter. Aviation so feared the rapid pitch-down nose-in WHACK; but now a branch of aviation: Energy kite systems ... will have an active branch that embraces the WHACK-opposite-WHACK,...repetitions; clutch the varied resultant tensions to rotary motion or pumping activity! Soak in the wind's flutter potential into energy sponges; empty those sponges to serve pointed purposes.
                Thanks Bill,
                Joe Faust
              • harry valentine
                So far the fluttermills have only been built to very low levels of output . . . enough for single homes in under-developed and developing countries. There is
                Message 7 of 7 , Mar 30, 2009
                  So far the "fluttermills" have only been built to very low levels of output . . . enough for single homes in under-developed and developing countries. There is the danger that the continual cyclic forces could cause damage to structures. Some oscillating wings have been mounted on poles and secured by weights and cables.
                   
                   
                  Harry
                   

                  To: AirborneWindEnergy@yahoogroups.com
                  From: joefaust333@...
                  Date: Mon, 30 Mar 2009 23:49:18 +0000
                  Subject: [AirborneWindEnergy] Re: Oscillating-Wing Power Generator by Kevin Jones || wingmill

                  Bill,
                  In support of your mention, I notice that:
                  Assuming de-construction of trees, de-leafing of fall season trees, leveling of old houses, putting out of commission poorly desinged airplanes, etc. are instance of work done, then flutter and buffet have been doing tremendous work every day around the world for millions on years. The wind's energy enters structures tether or not and frequently sets up oscillations that result in tearing apart structures until...with other processes, soil is made and enriched so new plants may be nourished. Capturing some of that flutter for making-energy- sake or for performing presecribed work would simple be receiving the gift of wind's flutter-induction capacity in a channeled manner for designed non-random purposes. Rapid Airborne Development (RAD) very well may have a large branch that capitalizes on flutter. Aviation so feared the rapid pitch-down nose-in WHACK; but now a branch of aviation: Energy kite systems ... will have an active branch that embraces the WHACK-opposite- WHACK,... repetitions; clutch the varied resultant tensions to rotary motion or pumping activity! Soak in the wind's flutter potential into energy sponges; empty those sponges to serve pointed purposes.
                  Thanks Bill,
                  Joe Faust




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