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Small Airports Seeking AWE R&D

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  • dave santos
    Its perhaps the most common myth in popular AWE reportage that existing aviation norms and interests will impede progress. Even Gerrard Hassan buys this
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 15, 2011
      Its perhaps the most common myth in popular AWE reportage that existing aviation norms and interests will impede progress. Even Gerrard Hassan buys this reasonable sounding theory at face value. Restrictive standards do apply in congested airspace, pending NextGen air traffic control, but such airspace is only a tiny fraction of world airspace, even in aviation intensive regions.
       
      The latest sign that aviation culture is going to embrace AWE and help perfect it is a growing list of small airports willing to host AWE R&D, as a new aviation niche market. I cannot report just yet, due to (damn) NDAs, which small airports are already on the list, but in face-to-face meetings with airport administrators and their stakeholders (aviators, aero clubs, skydivers, etc.) a so far universal consensus has been evident that AWE can coexist, that the operational issues are manageable. The stakeholders will even gladly collaborate to validate AWE multi-use.
       
      Here is how to find your own airport AWE partners: Look for a struggling airfield with good winds and low air traffic. Educate the administrators about AWE aviation and the specific means to integrate it safely into existing operations. A cautious step-by-step plan is appropriate. Offer usage fees and partnership agreements. Include these costs in your budgets to investors.
       
      You will find many eager FBOs (Fixed Base Operators (of small airfields)).
    • pjskywindpower
      It s a sign of the times that small airports looking to survive in this rugged economy are willing to consider hosting AWE testing, etc. If AWE players can
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 18, 2011
        It's a sign of the times that small airports looking to survive in this rugged economy are willing to consider hosting AWE testing, etc. If AWE players can move faster than the larger economy at delivering greater fees to these airports there will be less incentive for them kick AWE players out once the economy recovers. Now would be a good time to lock in agreements with distant enough expiration dates that AWE would have a chance to move into the mainstream before expiration.

        Non Disclosure Agreements? Sounds like a secret list. :-)

        "Offer usage fees and partnership agreements. Include these costs in your budgets to investors." That's a great suggestion! To this budget also add conference fees and travel/lodging costs as an essential business expense.

        If anyone finds a US regional airport (or a small one with not too distant international travel access) with great wind that could co-host AWE testing along with scheduled air traffic that would also allow an organization in the AWE world to rent all or part of a decent sized terminal facility at a very low price for an annual AWE conference, please send the contact info to me at pj@....

        --- In AirborneWindEnergy@yahoogroups.com, dave santos <santos137@...> wrote:
        >
        > Its perhaps the most common myth in popular AWE reportage that existing aviation norms and interests will impede progress. Even Gerrard Hassan buys this reasonable sounding theory at face value. Restrictive standards do apply in congested airspace, pending NextGen air traffic control, but such airspace is only a tiny fraction of world airspace, even in aviation intensive regions.
        >  
        > The latest sign that aviation culture is going to embrace AWE and help perfect it is a growing list of small airports willing to host AWE R&D, as a new aviation niche market. I cannot report just yet, due to (damn) NDAs, which small airports are already on the list, but in face-to-face meetings with airport administrators and their stakeholders (aviators, aero clubs, skydivers, etc.) a so far universal consensus has been evident that AWE can coexist, that the operational issues are manageable. The stakeholders will even gladly collaborate to validate AWE multi-use.
        >  
        > Here is how to find your own airport AWE partners: Look for a struggling airfield with good winds and low air traffic. Educate the administrators about AWE aviation and the specific means to integrate it safely into existing operations. A cautious step-by-step plan is appropriate. Offer usage fees and partnership agreements. Include these costs in your budgets to investors.
        >  
        > You will find many eager FBOs (Fixed Base Operators (of small airfields)).
        >
      • blturner3
        I live in Kansas City. This one of only 2 major airports on the edges of the large mid continental wind resources. The other is Minneapolis-saint paul. I used
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 19, 2011
          I live in Kansas City. This one of only 2 major airports on the edges of the large mid continental wind resources. The other is Minneapolis-saint paul. I used to live at a small airport east of town where we built ultralight aircraft and often flew around to other area airports. So I have an idea of the conflicts and synergies. I would say that Dave S. is correct that this is a potentially good collaboration. The only problem that I see is that smaller airports tend to be located where the ground is naturally flat. And that means mostly low lying and low wind for launching. I think that it might be a rare find to get everything one could want, but I could look around and see what I find.

          Brian
        • harry valentine
          The direction of the runways dictate the direction of approach and direction of departure at airports. There is much airspace around the airports that could
          Message 4 of 5 , Sep 19, 2011
            The direction of the runways dictate the direction of approach and direction of departure at airports. There is much airspace around the airports that could quite nicely accommodate some form of airborne or high-altitude wind power conversion.

            Harry


            To: AirborneWindEnergy@yahoogroups.com
            From: yahoo2@...
            Date: Mon, 19 Sep 2011 15:27:22 +0000
            Subject: [AWECS] Re: Small Airports Seeking AWE R&D

             
            I live in Kansas City. This one of only 2 major airports on the edges of the large mid continental wind resources. The other is Minneapolis-saint paul. I used to live at a small airport east of town where we built ultralight aircraft and often flew around to other area airports. So I have an idea of the conflicts and synergies. I would say that Dave S. is correct that this is a potentially good collaboration. The only problem that I see is that smaller airports tend to be located where the ground is naturally flat. And that means mostly low lying and low wind for launching. I think that it might be a rare find to get everything one could want, but I could look around and see what I find.

            Brian

          • dave santos
            Harry,   Its true that many airports have large open fields in the spaces around runways. As has been noted, small airports with a second crosswind runway
            Message 5 of 5 , Sep 19, 2011
              Harry,
               
              Its true that many airports have large open fields in the spaces around runways. As has been noted, small airports with a second crosswind runway have an interesting potential to host crosswind AWE generator vehicles on the idle runway. Two orthogonal paved runways can do the job of adapting to wind direction almost as well as a far more expensive paved field open in all directions. Conductive contact strips can be embedded along the runway to tap energy for the grid.
               
              There is an invisble airfield traffic pattern to keep clear of. In an emergency, the whole airspace needs to be clear. Shared airspace around an airport depends on all aircraft being able to "sense and avoid".
               
              Here are a few suggested current safety prerequisites to AWE operations at an airport-
              Only small-scale low-mass low-velocity low-altitude AWE operations are currently suited to existing small airport operations. Dynamic AWE power loads and surges must be buffered or isloated from airport systems.
               
              Aeronautic engineers should perform or advise the AWECS design and help present it for regional FAA FSDO review and approval. Shop around for NAS regions with air low traffic and willing inspectors.
               
              Particular concern must be paid to not crowding airfield approaches and the standard traffic pattern. Current FAA kite visibility standards are weak and should be exceeded.
               
              AWECS operations must have a Pilot In Command (PIC) (plus often a Visual Observer (VO)) able to quickly douse the kites (kite-killers) at first sign of trouble, especially in case of another aircraft's landing or take-off emergency (FAA Sense and Avoid requirement). The PIC or VO must monitor radio traffic.
               
              NOTAM must be daily filed (or equivalent airman awareness, like obstruction regs), just as skydiving and hot-air balloon operations do. Shared operations must include education, coordinating, and briefing all the conventional users. Small FBOs and remote airspace tend to host an easily-informed close community of users.
               
              daveS
               
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