Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Misc Secrets

Expand Messages
  • dave santos
    Clockwork Green   Allister wants well regulated mechanical output from membrane wing-mills & the like. Classical clockwork scaled up can do the job. After
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 14, 2009
      Clockwork Green
       
      Allister wants well regulated mechanical output from membrane wing-mills & the like. Classical clockwork scaled up can do the job. After all, a self-winding wristwatch converts chaotic wrist motion into chronometric steady output (The mainspring acts as a power buffer. Huge springs exist, but compressed air would also be a good super-buffer.).
       
      The oscillating mechanics of traditional clockwork offer scalable solutions for reciprocating AWE. A clock's foliot/balance-wheel or metronome's inverted pendulum serves to provide a steady harmonic oscillation to trigger AWE elements to "fire" as desired. A fusee, or tapered spiral drum, allows variable forces to be regulated or a constant force to be varied.
       
      Chaffing Gear
       
      Allister also noted that kitetlines will be prone to wear in reels, capstans, pulleys, & such. In many AWE schemes only a limited section of line experiences high wear. An effective solution is to put a wear section or jacket in/on a line where it runs thru machinery. Often this can be done without adding hardly any weight or expense.
       
      Viscous Damping
       
      For AWE turrets viscous damping helps implement cross wind "see-saws" or swaying booms while resisting lossey damping/hunting of the power pulse. A turret shaft with a viscous bearing or vanes in a viscous pool allows slow low-resistance weather-cocking. A pond makes an attractive viscous damper for a floating AWE turret. Sea based turrets may prove cheaper than land versions.
       
      Donut Pulley 
       
      Brooks asked for a "donut pulley" solution. The roller fairlead found on tow winches is one. Roller beads on a ring, as traditionally used to raise mainsails up a mast or as found on shower curtains, a a good trick for lesser objects shuttling along the line. The version below is made from fake pearls, very chic-
       
       
       
      More Heddle Tricks
       
      A kite often requires aggressive line control, especially landing/launching short-lined. Sometimes line must come in fast to avoid a luff/nose-dive. More often sudden slack is needed to pre-empt "lockout". A reel may have too much mass or be geared too low to react quickly. Snarled line is a danger. A dipping boom works but its an added major structure. The heddle solution is a section of line between fairleads that quickly pulls some line in or slacks faster than a reel can.
       
      Varidrogues are naturally two-line rigs & a heddle can switch the power/depower cycle while freely allowing reeling.
       
       
      COOPIP- Cooperative Intellectual Property
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       

    • Dave Culp
      Misc thoughts; interspersed below: ... Doing any kind of power regulation will add significantly to cost and detract equally significantly from
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 17, 2009
        Misc thoughts; interspersed below:

        On Wed, Oct 14, 2009 at 9:06 PM, dave santos <santos137@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        > Clockwork Green
        >
        > Allister wants well regulated mechanical output from membrane wing-mills & the like. Classical clockwork scaled up can do the job. After all, a self-winding wristwatch converts chaotic wrist motion into chronometric steady output (The mainspring acts as a power buffer. Huge springs exist, but compressed air would also be a good super-buffer.).

        Doing any kind of power regulation will add significantly to cost and
        detract equally significantly from cost-effectiveness. Better, IMO, to
        use the power grid itself for regulation--until the economies of scale
        both eliminate the ability to do so and concurrently make regulation
        affordable at the unit level. Denmark's national AWE grid suggests
        that up to 15-20% of an entire country's power can come from extremely
        variable sources before the grid is unable to effectively serve as
        regulator. We are a long ways from that point.


        > Chaffing Gear
        >
        > Allister also noted that kitetlines will be prone to wear in reels, capstans, pulleys, & such. In many AWE schemes only a limited section of line experiences high wear. An effective solution is to put a wear section or jacket in/on a line where it runs thru machinery. Often this can be done without adding hardly any weight or expense.

        Dean on, Dave. Sailors and sailing kite flyers have been doing this
        for a lont time; It is simply and cheaply possible not only to add
        such a jacket, it is equally simple and cheap to taper it back into
        the rope, allowing flawless feeding through pulleys, winches, etc.
        >
        > Viscous Damping
        >
        > For AWE turrets viscous damping helps implement cross wind "see-saws" or swaying booms while resisting lossey damping/hunting of the power pulse. A turret shaft with a viscous bearing or vanes in a viscous pool allows slow low-resistance weather-cocking. A pond makes an attractive viscous damper for a floating AWE turret. Sea based turrets may prove cheaper than land versions.

        Looked into this, found that energy loss into the damping medium is
        truly lost for good. IMO, no AWE system can stand such net losses and
        remain viable.

        >
        > Donut Pulley
        >
        > Brooks asked for a "donut pulley" solution. The roller fairlead found on tow winches is one. Roller beads on a ring, as traditionally used to raise mainsails up a mast or as found on shower curtains, a a good trick for lesser objects shuttling along the line. The version below is made from fake pearls, very chic-
        >
        > http://www.energykitesystems.net/KiteLab/donutpulley.jpg

        These beads are called "parrels" in the boating biz...

        >
        >
        > More Heddle Tricks
        >
        > A kite often requires aggressive line control, especially landing/launching short-lined. Sometimes line must come in fast to avoid a luff/nose-dive. More often sudden slack is needed to pre-empt "lockout". A reel may have too much mass or be geared too low to react quickly. Snarled line is a danger. A dipping boom works but its an added major structure. The heddle solution is a section of line between fairleads that quickly pulls some line in or slacks faster than a reel can.

        There are a number of industrially-based schemes for doing such
        tricks. No disagreement or knock here, just pointing out that there
        exists much previous art to draw from. Watching a sheet steel mill
        stop a few dozen tons of sheet to end-weld it to another few hundred
        tons of metal at one point in the production line, while the remainder
        of the line continues at 50 ft/second is an awesome sight. The welders
        are so calm, while only seconds remain between flawless continuation
        of production and a literal train wreck (in tons of metal and
        machinery--and lives--potentially destroyed).

        Dave
      • dave santos
        True, viscous damping is a loss (unless the heat is usable) but its so practical, playing a role in many systems like vehicle transmissions & suspensions &
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 17, 2009
          True, viscous damping is a loss (unless the heat is usable) but its so practical, playing a role in many systems like vehicle transmissions & suspensions & boat stabilizers & can increase overall system performance. There are many losses in practical power mechanics & a viscous damped turret may often win over a more complex less reliable "smart" clutch mechanism. The key is high enough viscosity that the turret barely gives to short torsional pulse, but the weak persistent input of a change in wind direction is followed.
           
          Clockwork is great for regulating the "firing" of a wing-mill or varidrogue. Clockwork is also suited for small off grid power smoothing. Its Steam-Punk cool. A compressed air servovalve over an airmotor/gen is also workable. One still wants synchronous AC to feed a utility grid even if the supply is up & down. Introducing AWE into the steam cycle of a conventional fossil fueled power plant may regulate chaotic power input at utility scale (Coal to Kite).
           
          The heddle idea seems like the cheapest & simplest of many line varying solutions. Aerial tramways also have good tricks. Will look for your conveyor example.
           
          Thanks for the parrel note. Boat rigging is a vast pool of AWE ready tricks.


          --- On Sat, 10/17/09, Dave Culp <dave@...> wrote:

          From: Dave Culp <dave@...>
          Subject: Re: [AirborneWindEnergy] Misc Secrets
          To: AirborneWindEnergy@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Saturday, October 17, 2009, 11:37 AM

           
          Misc thoughts; interspersed below:

          On Wed, Oct 14, 2009 at 9:06 PM, dave santos <santos137@yahoo. com> wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          > Clockwork Green
          >
          > Allister wants well regulated mechanical output from membrane wing-mills & the like. Classical clockwork scaled up can do the job. After all, a self-winding wristwatch converts chaotic wrist motion into chronometric steady output (The mainspring acts as a power buffer.  Huge springs exist, but compressed air would also be a good super-buffer. ).

          Doing any kind of power regulation will add significantly to cost and
          detract equally significantly from cost-effectiveness. Better, IMO, to
          use the power grid itself for regulation-- until the economies of scale
          both eliminate the ability to do so and concurrently make regulation
          affordable at the unit level. Denmark's national AWE grid suggests
          that up to 15-20% of an entire country's power can come from extremely
          variable sources before the grid is unable to effectively serve as
          regulator. We are a long ways from that point.

          > Chaffing Gear
          >
          > Allister also noted that kitetlines will be prone to wear in reels, capstans, pulleys, & such. In many AWE schemes only a limited section of line experiences high wear. An effective solution is to put a wear section or jacket in/on a line where it runs thru machinery. Often this can be done without adding hardly any weight or expense.

          Dean on, Dave. Sailors and sailing kite flyers have been doing this
          for a lont time; It is simply and cheaply possible not only to add
          such a jacket, it is equally simple and cheap to taper it back into
          the rope, allowing flawless feeding through pulleys, winches, etc.
          >
          > Viscous Damping
          >
          > For AWE turrets viscous damping helps implement cross wind "see-saws" or swaying booms  while resisting lossey  damping/hunting of the power pulse. A turret shaft with a viscous bearing or vanes in a viscous pool allows slow low-resistance weather-cocking. A pond makes an attractive viscous damper for a floating AWE turret. Sea based turrets may prove cheaper than land versions.

          Looked into this, found that energy loss into the damping medium is
          truly lost for good. IMO, no AWE system can stand such net losses and
          remain viable.

          >
          > Donut Pulley
          >
          > Brooks asked for a "donut pulley" solution. The roller fairlead found on tow winches is one. Roller beads on a ring, as traditionally used to raise mainsails up a mast or as found on shower curtains, a a good trick for lesser objects shuttling along the line. The version below is made from fake pearls, very chic-
          >
          > http://www.energyki tesystems. net/KiteLab/ donutpulley. jpg

          These beads are called "parrels" in the boating biz...

          >
          >
          > More Heddle Tricks
          >
          > A kite often requires aggressive line control, especially landing/launching short-lined. Sometimes line must come in fast to avoid a luff/nose-dive. More often sudden slack is needed to pre-empt "lockout". A reel may have too much mass or be geared too low to react quickly. Snarled line is a danger. A dipping boom works but its an added major structure. The heddle solution is a section of line between fairleads that quickly pulls some line in or slacks faster than a reel can.

          There are a number of industrially- based schemes for doing such
          tricks. No disagreement or knock here, just pointing out that there
          exists much previous art to draw from. Watching a sheet steel mill
          stop a few dozen tons of sheet to end-weld it to another few hundred
          tons of metal at one point in the production line, while the remainder
          of the line continues at 50 ft/second is an awesome sight. The welders
          are so calm, while only seconds remain between flawless continuation
          of production and a literal train wreck (in tons of metal and
          machinery--and lives--potentially destroyed).

          Dave

        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.