Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Updating a Limbach L1700EA

Expand Messages
  • J.D. Barron
    Bob, I have a question relating the the Limbach L1700EA I have on my motorglider project. This engine has a low time, but has not run recently. The prop is a
    Message 1 of 10 , Jan 1, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      Bob,
      I have a question relating the the Limbach L1700EA I have on my
      motorglider project. This engine has a low time, but has not run
      recently. The prop is a Hoffman matched to the glider in 1982. I
      assume that it is correct. My question is can the Limbach be improved
      by adding larger bore cylinders etc? The heads are single port and it
      has the single Zenith carb and single ignition with Slick magneto.

      I have considered upadting to one of the newer engines with the rear
      casting holding the alternator and starter, but the engine (bottom
      1/3) bolts to the firewall and the mag fits in a shelf made as part
      of the firewall. The existing starter and alternator drive off the
      ring gear on the prop flange on the front.

      The 60 hp rating for take off is probably OK if the runway were a
      little longer than mine.i have 1500 ft dirt with fairly good
      approaches mostly into the wind. I am a good ways from needing an
      engine since the project is just starting out so I have time to think
      out the plan.

      Do you have any suggestions or would the best thing be to overhaul or
      freshen up the engine and leave it as is?

      Thanks,

      J.D. Barron
    • Denis N. Afanassyev
      Mr Barron, My advice is to leave this engine as it is. Limbach is a thoroughbred aircraft engine, it is very reliable and predictable. Also L1700EA and L2000EA
      Message 2 of 10 , Jan 1, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Mr Barron,

        My advice is to leave this engine as it is. Limbach is a
        thoroughbred aircraft engine, it is very reliable and predictable.
        Also L1700EA and L2000EA are the lightest aero versions of the VW.

        The L1700EA is rated at 68HP at 3600RPM. The Hoffman prop may be
        limited to 3000RPM at takeoff so the full power potential of this
        engine may not be used. With a better prop one can get abot 3200-
        3300RPM at takeoff, and correspondingly 63-65HP. These figures are
        already better than those known for most 1835cc conversions (69 x
        92). This is achieved by careful design of the intake manifold, cam
        profile and many other measures. The BMEP value of this engine is
        the same as that of most Lycoming engines of much higher
        displacement.
        Simply increasing the bore you may not preserve this level of
        sophistication and the resulting output may increase just a bit or
        may not increase at all.

        L2000EA is rated at 80HP/3400RPM. It has not only larger bores, but
        larger stroke too.

        Best regards,

        Denis N. Afanassyev

        --- In AirVW@yahoogroups.com, "J.D. Barron" <barron.j.d@...> wrote:
        >
        > Bob,
        > I have a question relating the the Limbach L1700EA I have on my
        > motorglider project. This engine has a low time, but has not run
        > recently. The prop is a Hoffman matched to the glider in 1982. I
        > assume that it is correct. My question is can the Limbach be
        improved
        > by adding larger bore cylinders etc? The heads are single port and
        it
        > has the single Zenith carb and single ignition with Slick magneto.
        >
        > I have considered upadting to one of the newer engines with the
        rear
        > casting holding the alternator and starter, but the engine (bottom
        > 1/3) bolts to the firewall and the mag fits in a shelf made as
        part
        > of the firewall. The existing starter and alternator drive off the
        > ring gear on the prop flange on the front.
        >
        > The 60 hp rating for take off is probably OK if the runway were a
        > little longer than mine.i have 1500 ft dirt with fairly good
        > approaches mostly into the wind. I am a good ways from needing an
        > engine since the project is just starting out so I have time to
        think
        > out the plan.
        >
        > Do you have any suggestions or would the best thing be to overhaul
        or
        > freshen up the engine and leave it as is?
        >
        > Thanks,
        >
        > J.D. Barron
        >
      • n4854035
        ... No. The reasons (there s a bunch of them) have to do with the fact the Limbach -- in its present configuration -- is a CERTIFIED engine and a major
        Message 3 of 10 , Jan 1, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          --- In AirVW@yahoogroups.com, "J.D. Barron" <barron.j.d@...> wrote:
          >
          > My question is can the Limbach be improved
          > by adding larger bore cylinders etc?
          --------------------------------------------------------

          No.

          The reasons (there's a bunch of them) have to do with the fact the
          Limbach -- in its present configuration -- is a CERTIFIED engine and a
          major percentage of its worth hinges upon that fact. Any unauthorized
          alterations renders it uncertified and reduces its value to whatever
          someone is willing to pay for it.

          What you have now is a well-integrated design, sufficiently sturdy to
          gain LBA certification. If the engine proves inadequate you might
          consider trading-up to the two-liter version or building an entirely
          new engine.

          There are so many reasons for NOT altering your present engine that it
          would be impractical to cite them all via email but in hope of
          convincing you, I'll mention a couple of biggies, the first being
          finding someone qualified to do the work.

          What you're looking at -- the mod you've suggested -- is installation
          of cylinders having a diameter larger than the present 88mm. The
          tricky-bit here is that there are a couple of after-market sizes (90,
          90.5 and 92) that MAY fit the existing spigot-bores in the crankcase,
          making the swap appear to be a slam-dunk. Unfortunately, since all of
          the jugs mentioned have the same core-size, their bigger bore is
          obtained at the cost of reduced sealing surface where the barrel fits
          into the heads. This is usually dealt with through the use of copper
          sealing rings but the thickness of the seals impacts the combustion
          chamber's 'squish' area and will reduce the engine's combustion
          efficiency unless other changes are made to off-set the wider squish
          dimension. Doing so isn't especially difficult but the engine was
          set-up for a CR of 8:1 and virtually everything you do in the way of
          bigger jugs is going to raise that figure, possibly to unacceptable
          heights. When/if that happens, there are a number of acceptable
          'fixes,' the most common being the use of spacers under the new
          barrels AND sealing rings of suitable thicknesss between the barrels
          and the heads, so as to keep your CR within an acceptable range
          (typically no more than 8.5:1). But when you get all that worked out
          you will discover the WIDTH of your engine has increased by 2x the
          combined thickness of yours spacers & seals. At the very least that
          means you're going to need a new set of push-rods... assuming the
          existing cam AND CARB is suitable for your new, larger displacement.

          The fact such mods ARE done leads the Instant Experts (who have done
          one :-) to assume it is a relatively trivial task since the only
          apparent change has been to replace small jugs with bigger ones. This
          woefully naive view ignores the fact that every engine is a system in
          which all of the components must be carefully integrated in order to
          achieve acceptable durability, reliability and efficiency.

          ------------------------------------------------------

          > The heads are single port and it
          > has the single Zenith carb and single ignition with Slick magneto.
          >
          ------------------------------------------------------

          Despite conventional wisdom to the contrary, single-port heads are no
          detriment to power and offer numerous advantages with regard to
          durability. The American practice of using Dual-Port heads on VW's
          converted for flight reflects the dune-buggy mentality behind most of
          these engines, with their hot-rod cams an toothpick props spinning as
          high as 4500 rpm. (Note that the two-liter Limbach somehow manages to
          get by with single-port heads :-)

          -------------------------------------------

          >
          > Do you have any suggestions or would the best thing be to overhaul or
          > freshen up the engine and leave it as is?
          >
          ---------------------------------------------------

          If the engine has been stored with the rocker-shafts in place it means
          at least two of your valves have been held open. If the engine was
          not properly pickled, you'll probably have some rust to deal with
          along with a couple of new valve springs.

          Any suggestions other than those already offered above would hinge
          upon knowing more about the airframe and your situation, but you
          should be aware of the fact you ...YOU... can build an engine that is
          more powerful and more durable than anything offered by Limbach for
          about the same weight and about half the price. The main difference
          is the lack of certification (an absolute requirement in much of Europe).

          -R.S.Hoover
        • J.D. Barron
          Thanks Bob and all. The engine seems to be in good shape and turning it over by hand feels good. Compression is comparable on all cylinders. The guy I bought
          Message 4 of 10 , Jan 1, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            Thanks Bob and all. The engine seems to be in good shape and turning
            it over by hand feels good. Compression is comparable on all
            cylinders. The guy I bought it from must have overfilled the
            crankcase with oil which may have helped protect the cam. When I
            pulled the valve cover oil poured out from the galley and continued
            from the pushrod tubes. The valve boxes seem to bee fairly clean with
            no sludge build up and the aluminum is still silver witha little
            coating.

            I may try to run the engine before I remove it to work on the
            fuselage. What would be the best way to portect the engine after it
            has been run? What type of oil? This engine was manufactured in 1987
            and replaced a runout engine in this aircraft (1500 hrs?). Everything
            looks low time and relatively unused.

            Thanks for the advice. It is likely that I can gain the performance I
            need by being very careful with weight of the airframe. If I need
            more horsepower then I will worry about a different engine.

            Thanks again and I am oper for any other suggeations.

            J.D. Barron
          • n4854035
            ... I m afraid there s a bit more to it than that, which sounds like a cop-out so follow me through, here. The EXTERIOR of the engine should be as clean as
            Message 5 of 10 , Jan 1, 2007
            • 0 Attachment
              --- In AirVW@yahoogroups.com, "J.D. Barron" <barron.j.d@...> wrote:
              > What would be the best way to portect the engine after it
              > has been run? What type of oil?

              ---------------------------------------------------

              I'm afraid there's a bit more to it than that, which sounds like a
              cop-out so follow me through, here.

              The EXTERIOR of the engine should be as clean as possible. The paint
              should be in good condition. If there is any evidence of rust, it
              must be treated with a rust converter or inhibitor.

              All fuel is drained from the carb, header-tank & gascolator; you want
              it completely dry with regard to fuel. If the engine is not
              installed, it's usually best to remove the carb and store it in its
              own container.

              The sump should be drained. (Pull the plug, let it drain why you do
              the other stuff.) If fitted with an oil filter, the canister is
              removed and a new canister is installed to close the openings. If
              fitted with an oil cooler it should be removed, drained and stored
              separately AFTER filling with kerosene or light oil.

              The combustion chamber and spark plugs are coated with combustion
              products, some of which will turn into corrosives if allowed to absorb
              moisture. The plugs must be pulled and anti-corrosion oil (sometimes
              called 'pickling' oil) should be SPRAYED into the cylinders. With the
              plugs out, the crankshaft should be rotated 2x the number of cylinders.

              If the engine is a converted VW, the rocker shaft(s) should be slacked
              off or removed so as to leave the valves closed.

              Desiccant plugs are installed into spark plug holes, exhaust stacks
              and the intake manifold. If this is a VW and the crankshaft is not
              fitted with a shaft seal, the annular openening in the crankcase must
              be sealed.

              If the engine is to be shipped, the sump is left dry but purged with
              dry nitrogen before sealing the crankcase ventilation inlet & outlet.
              If the engine is to be locally stored, the sump-plug is re-installed
              and the sump is over-filled with oil by about 25%. The engine should
              be tagged 'DO NOT ROTATE.'

              The engine should be bagged with all of its components and the bag
              should be sealed.

              Preserved in this fashion the engine is good for a minimum of sixty
              months.

              ------------------------------------------------

              Lotta trouble, eh?

              Truth is, if you can run the thing about a gallon (of fuel) a month,
              and change the oil every year or so, it'll do about as well as being
              pickled.

              ------------------------------------------------

              The key factors to pickling are control of combustion products so as
              not to generate corrosives, which hinges largely upon sealing things
              up so as not to allow the engine to 'breath.' A factor unique to
              Volkswagens is the tendency for their valve springs to take a set, so
              it's wise to pull the rockers.

              Diurnal temperature variation is sufficient to cause an unsealed
              engine to 'breath.' The tricky bit here is that the in-flowing air
              will always contain some moisture which will tend to condense INSIDE
              the engine at night. (Stored in a hangar in a humid climate, I've
              seen engines 'inhale' enough moisture to cause the sump to overflow in
              less than three months.) But the moisture doesn't have to condense to
              do its thing -- its presence alone is sufficient to promote rust and
              corrosion.

              --------------------------------------------

              WD-40 is mostly kerosene and should NOT be used as an anti-corrosion
              oil. All oil dealers offer a suitable 'pickling' oil but most
              retailed don't stock it. (Aircraft Spruce offers just one brand.)
              Spark plug dealers are often the best source for desiccant plugs. If
              the exhaust stacks are SS simply plugging them usually does well
              enough; if carbon steel, they need the big desiccant plugs (it's a
              cone-shaped jobbie -- one-size-fits-all -- that looks like something a
              plumber would use).

              Any good grade of running-oil (as opposed to break-in oil) will do to
              fill the sump. But if the thing is to be shipped, it's always done
              DRY, after plastering it with a dozen tags to that effect (and someone
              will STILL try to fire the thing up without oil. Go figger.)

              ---------------------------------------------

              Bringing a pickled engine back to life is mostly common sense...
              meaning about half the time it's done wrong :-)

              You want to flush the cylinders to get rid of the pickling oil. This
              always leaves a bit of residue UNLESS you can turn the (VW) engine
              upside down (easy to do if you have the stock VW engine-support
              fixture). Drain the sump. With the valves pointing toward the floor,
              flush the jugs on that bank with de-natured alcohol using one of those
              squeeze-type lab bottles. After being flushed, blow them dry. With
              the other bank pointing toward the floor, I give each flushed, dried
              jug a shot of 30W (mebbe half a teaspoon).

              Rocker shafts are re-installed, valves are adjusted then a
              pressure-luber (*) is connected to the main oil gallery and the engine
              is slowly rotated until I see a positive flow at all of the adjusters.
              (You won't see this on a Limbach. But you will eventually see some
              oil at the rockers.)

              Oil filter is filled & spun on, sump-plug safetied & the sump is
              filled, all seals & desiccant plugs removed & inventoried, spark plugs
              are installed, leads attached (usually incorrectly :-), fuel is fed to
              the carb, engine is primed & pulled through, ignition made hot then
              the prop is given a flip. If you've got a good ignition system
              (Limbach's don't) it'll start.

              Smart-money sez to run it no more than a minute or two then DRAIN THE
              OIL. The idea here is to act as a flush. If the oil is clear you can
              let it settle, then re-use it.

              ---------------------------------------

              Lotsa stuff not mentioned -- rubber parts get replaced... hoses an the
              like. SOP. Old engines get treated a bit differently from young
              engines. Test-runs after un-pickling are usually with a club & big
              eye-brows to ensure adequate cooling while you tune the carb & cables.
              When the prop goes on, it gets tracked, should be dynamically
              balanced once the engine is running good. All 'unimportant' details :-)

              Personally, since it's a Limbach engine, that's who should be
              answering your questions. I do things they don't. And visa-versa :-)

              -R.S.Hoover

              (*) pressure-luber is just a garden sprayer with suitable fittings.
              New engine, or one just out of storage, you want to make sure it's
              'wet' all the way through before trying to start it.
            • J.D. Barron
              ... Thanks for the advice everybody. I think that I will take your kind advice Bob. I don t know how long the airframe will take to get going. One question I
              Message 6 of 10 , Jan 2, 2007
              • 0 Attachment
                >
                > I'm afraid there's a bit more to it than that, which sounds like a
                > cop-out so follow me through, here.

                Thanks for the advice everybody. I think that I will take your kind
                advice Bob. I don't know how long the airframe will take to get
                going.

                One question I have is would you suggest taking the heads off and
                having a the valves touched up and look at the cylinder bores or look
                into the cylinders and try running it? Perhaps a rehone and rings? An
                inspection probably wouldn't hurt. Or leave it in the original
                Limbach pristine state?

                This aircraft has a brake on the back of the flywheel/ring gear and
                it is barely marked. I have no idea how many hours on the aircraft.
                The intake, carb and exhaust have always been mounted. I plan to pull
                the exhaust and have the piper Jet Hot coated to slow down rusting.
                The muffler is stainless.

                There is some mention of carb heat in the SF-25 literature and this
                engine has an oil heated intake/cooler that the carb mounts to. I
                assume that this is adequate Do you know anything about this part?

                All in all the aircraft is a big puzzel. Large parts need to be
                rebuilt. There are few Scheibe SF-25's in this country and the parts
                I have were modified so much that the factory says that there is
                nothing original. Basically the entire fuselage will have to be
                redone along with the tail. I have a good engine and wings and
                fittings and parts. Lots of opertunity!

                I know a little something about aircraft (non Limbach) engines since
                I do have an A&P w/ IA, but little or no VW experience.

                Thanks Bob and all,

                J.D. Barron
              • J.D. Barron
                Bob, I looked up your blog on the DIS-IX system. It looks like the 009 distributor with the compufire pickup and dual wasted spark coils might be a good setup.
                Message 7 of 10 , Jan 3, 2007
                • 0 Attachment
                  Bob,

                  I looked up your blog on the DIS-IX system. It looks like the 009
                  distributor with the compufire pickup and dual wasted spark coils
                  might be a good setup. The 009 will give the advance curve for easy
                  starting and good timing through the RPM range. The only draw back is
                  the required 12 VDC power. Perhaps a second battery with some sort of
                  auto switching so that a reserve would always remain in the case of
                  loss of alternator for a little while anyway.

                  Perfect perhaps would be if the combustion chamber were designed for
                  dual ignition on the Limbach. If this were the case then the magneto
                  and the Compufire systems could be used. Perhaps the mag could be
                  timed after the compufire and used on plugs installed in the bottom.
                  That way the timing system of the 009 would produce ignition and
                  actually run the engine and the magneto act as a "backup" ignition.
                  Since the ignition would have already begun the squish would be
                  maintained.

                  Very good blog by the way. I think that the cap on the 009 would be
                  low enough to clear the cowling. Just that darned power thing for the
                  12V.

                  Thanks,

                  J.D.
                • Hal Hadaller
                  There are many more areas of concern for failure when flying than the ignition system. In fact, double ignition itself is prone to more failures just due to
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jan 3, 2007
                  • 0 Attachment
                    There are many more areas of concern for failure when flying than the ignition system. In fact, double ignition itself is prone to more failures just due to the number of parts,pieces, drilling holes in the heads, etc. With modern ignition systems, very few cars are ever stalled out because of ignition component failure.

                    In the old days, things were very unreliable including the magneto systems; so a secondary set was mandatory for survival. Even the modern magnetoes are rated for 500 hours and inspection/teardown required. I would feel much worse on the Limbach with just the one magneto if one maintains this like most folks that have an engine with 2 magnetos. The moral of that story is that when you have a backup, you become careless or have a tendency to ignore what should be done so one is most likely no better off with the backup or even maybe worse. Without the backup, you most likely will do the maintenance that should be done as that is all you have.

                    The DIS-IX system does have some faults. One critical one is if power is left ON without the engine running. It this case, if the hall effect trigger/triggers happen to be in a close position, full current will flow thru the coils and trigger plate. This most surely will cause a failure of the coil and or the trigger plate. I had this happen to me with this system. (There are some other systems on the market that have an auto shutoff after so many seconds of the system ON and no pulsing.) The worse part about this is that one could have done this but not had a failure but did do damage to the coil or trigger plate; which then could fail at some later time as it has been stressed. The other area is the requirement for some sort of backup battery. I had done this with a backup 4 AH battery that I would automatically run the engine on startup and then auto switch to the main battery once the alternator kicked in. I even had connection of the backup battery to the panel mounted voltmeter. But about 6 months later I had removed the battery for something so decided to borrow it for some lights and guess what? The battery had very little capacity. It would charge quickly and then have enough charge to power things for a few minutes. Had I needed it, if the main system failed, it would have not got me home and not much more than extended my glide for a few more minutes. It was a new battery when I got it. The point here is that the BACKUP that made me feel GOOD and SAFE was an accident waiting. It may be better to keep the system simple.

                    The DIS-IX system is probably the best out there. It is very basic and simple. Know one thing about the waste spark system is that BOTH plugs have to spark to get either one to work. If for some reason a plug OPENS, the other one will not fire. But then you still have a 2 cylinder engine to greatly extend your glide.

                    Hal


                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: J.D. Barron
                    To: AirVW@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Wednesday, January 03, 2007 7:13 PM
                    Subject: [AirVW] Re: Updating a Limbach L1700EA


                    Bob,

                    I looked up your blog on the DIS-IX system. It looks like the 009
                    distributor with the compufire pickup and dual wasted spark coils
                    might be a good setup. The 009 will give the advance curve for easy
                    starting and good timing through the RPM range. The only draw back is
                    the required 12 VDC power. Perhaps a second battery with some sort of
                    auto switching so that a reserve would always remain in the case of
                    loss of alternator for a little while anyway.

                    Perfect perhaps would be if the combustion chamber were designed for
                    dual ignition on the Limbach. If this were the case then the magneto
                    and the Compufire systems could be used. Perhaps the mag could be
                    timed after the compufire and used on plugs installed in the bottom.
                    That way the timing system of the 009 would produce ignition and
                    actually run the engine and the magneto act as a "backup" ignition.
                    Since the ignition would have already begun the squish would be
                    maintained.

                    Very good blog by the way. I think that the cap on the 009 would be
                    low enough to clear the cowling. Just that darned power thing for the
                    12V.

                    Thanks,

                    J.D.





                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • n4854035
                    ... The DIS-IX is proving to be a practical, inexpensive ignition system for VW powered aircraft. In my opinion, the best solution for the 12v power problem is
                    Message 9 of 10 , Jan 3, 2007
                    • 0 Attachment
                      --- In AirVW@yahoogroups.com, "J.D. Barron" <barron.j.d@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Bob,
                      >
                      > I looked up your blog on the DIS-IX system. It looks like the 009
                      > distributor with the compufire pickup and dual wasted spark coils
                      > might be a good setup. The 009 will give the advance curve for easy
                      > starting and good timing through the RPM range. The only draw back is
                      > the required 12 VDC power. Perhaps a second battery with some sort of
                      > auto switching so that a reserve would always remain in the case of
                      > loss of alternator for a little while anyway.

                      ---------------------------------------------

                      The DIS-IX is proving to be a practical, inexpensive ignition system
                      for VW powered aircraft.

                      In my opinion, the best solution for the 12v power problem is to
                      install a co-axially driven permanent-magnet dynamo. I've designed
                      mounts that allow it to be installed on either end of the crankshaft
                      (I put the prop on the clutch-end). Mounted co-axially, bearings,
                      belts and brushes drop out of the equation, leaving only the
                      rectifier, which is conservatively rated at 30A. At prop speeds, the
                      dynamo typically produces from between 8A and 12A, whereas the DIS-IX
                      averages about 3A. Bottom line is that long as the engine is running,
                      you've got power... and enough in the battery to let you stay aloft
                      until you can manage a safe landing.

                      Drawings & photos of the mounts can be found on several of the
                      VW-specific Groups, or contact me directly.

                      -------------------------------------------------

                      >
                      > Perfect perhaps would be if the combustion chamber were designed for
                      > dual ignition on the Limbach. If this were the case then the magneto
                      > and the Compufire systems could be used. Perhaps the mag could be
                      > timed after the compufire and used on plugs installed in the bottom.
                      > That way the timing system of the 009 would produce ignition and
                      > actually run the engine and the magneto act as a "backup" ignition.
                      > Since the ignition would have already begun the squish would be
                      > maintained.

                      --------------------------------------------------

                      Alas, it's not. (ie, designed for two spark plugs. On the Type I
                      heads, adding the second plug causes a few problems as well as adding
                      to the complexity of the engine. If you absolutely have to have two
                      spark plugs, the Corvair or Type IV heads are better candidates.

                      If there is an absolute need for dual ignition you can always cobble
                      things up but the odds are, it won't provide any more reliability than
                      a properly designed single-plug system.

                      ------------------------------------------------
                      >
                      > Very good blog by the way.
                      ------------------------------------------------

                      Thank you. I'm still figuring out how to do it.

                      ------------------------------------------------

                      >I think that the cap on the 009 would be
                      > low enough to clear the cowling. Just that darned power thing for the
                      > 12V.
                      >-----------------------------------------------

                      I've included a drawing of the DIS-IX cap on the -009 body in one of
                      the other articles dealing with ignition.

                      This approach isn't all that new, by the way. I made my first
                      transistorized ignition in the late sixties and was running the PM
                      dynamo from a Honda on a 2180 I built in the early '70's. The
                      introduction of low-cost rare-earth magnets in the late 1980's is what
                      makes the present-day stuff work so well. (The unit shown on the
                      Volksplane list is off a Harley-Davidson.)

                      -R.S.Hoover
                    • J.D. Barron
                      Perhaps removing the Bendix mag on the rear and rigging an alternator drive off the mounting would be in order. Perhaps some sort of PM alternator like the
                      Message 10 of 10 , Jan 4, 2007
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Perhaps removing the Bendix mag on the rear and rigging an alternator
                        drive off the mounting would be in order. Perhaps some sort of PM
                        alternator like the Kubota with a series pass regulator for dual
                        electrical system. The direct drive added alternator and the belt drive
                        off the front would perhaps do this trick.

                        You are correct about the relaibility of the new ignition systems. I
                        would hope to have as low a distributor as possible and keep the
                        advance circuit for good power and easy starting. Easy starting on a
                        motorglider is fairly important. A dual electrical buss would not ne
                        too heavy or complex.

                        Thanks for the input and opinion.

                        J.D. Barron
                      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.