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Re: carb ice??

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  • Jonsimik
    Still say..Ellison ona money on this one. ... Summary, For certificated aircraft, FAR 23.1093 requires that the intake air heat system must provide a heat
    Message 1 of 53 , Sep 1, 2006
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      'Still say..Ellison ona money on this one.

      ----------------------------------------
      "Summary,
      For certificated aircraft, FAR 23.1093 requires that the intake air
      heat system must provide a heat rise of 90°F at 75% power. It makes a
      great deal of sense to comply with this regulation when building an
      "Experimental" category aircraft. To prevent engine failure caused by
      carburetor or induction ice, this type of heat system must be
      installed on all aircraft (including experimental) which use the
      Ellison Throttle Body Injector."
      -------------------------------------------------
      jon

      ps..anybody can sue..

      --- In AirVW@yahoogroups.com, Gary Gower <vw_to_fly@...> wrote:
      >
      > Sure you can sue, But the ice will have melted by the
      > time your lawyer has to prove it... :-) ;-0
      >
      > Sorry Hal, couldnt resist the yoke.
      >
      > Saludos
      > Gary Gower.
      >
      > --- Hal Hadaller <flyhal@...> wrote:
      >
      > > I guess that the proof is in the pudding. But I
      > > would like to taste a little more.
      > >
      > > Could one sue them if carb ice does happen?
      > >
      > > HAl
      > >
      > >
      > > ----- Original Message -----
      > > From: charlie4_66043
      > > To: AirVW@yahoogroups.com
      > > Sent: Monday, August 21, 2006 8:15 AM
      > > Subject: [AirVW] Re: carb ice??
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In AirVW@yahoogroups.com, s.chilcott@
      > > wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Hi Hal
      > > > Aero Vee do not say that carb heat is not needed
      > > and as I said in a
      > > previous
      > > > post they place a warning in their installation
      > > manual saying you
      > > must have a
      > > > source of carb heat. However they then go on to
      > > sell an air filter
      > > that has no
      > > > provision for carb heat.
      > > >
      > > > Rgds Steve
      > > >
      > >
      > > Sonex makes this statement on their FAQ site:
      > > 10. Impervious to carb ice: Due to its design with
      > > no venturi and no
      > > butterfly, no factory AeroCarb installations have
      > > ever used carb
      > > heat. There has also never been a documented case
      > > of carb ice in any
      > > AeroCarb installation or any of the carbs in the
      > > same family
      > > including the Lake Injector and POSA carbs which
      > > are well into the
      > > tens of thousands of flight hours.

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    • Rick Stockton
      Usually carb ice is not a problem at or below 75% power. The butterfly valve on most carbs is where the fuel in sucked into the air stream going to the
      Message 53 of 53 , Sep 3, 2006
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        Usually carb ice is not a problem at or below 75% power. The
        butterfly valve on most carbs is where the fuel in sucked into the air
        stream going to the engine. The drop in temperture can be as much as
        30 degrees. If there is moisture in the air then it can freeze on the
        butterfly valve. Most of the Teenie Two accidents were on takeoff.
        When they check the engine everything is found to be operating
        correctly. The one thing they can't find is the ice. It has melted.
        If I had a carb I'd make sure I had a source of heat and a temp probe
        near the intake. I flew many hours on a Bell 47 and have a few hours
        in the R-22. Both get carb ice quickly. A number of the R-22 crashed
        when the pilots were practicing autorotions. The butterfly was in the
        closed position and it would freeze the moisture around the butterfly
        causing the engine to quit. A gentleman was flying in the clouds at
        10000 feet over the LAX VOR in a Piper PA-250 with a pressure carb and
        he allowed the ice to built on the outside air intake or it built up
        on the butterfly valve to the point that the engine quit. One reason
        I selected fuel injection for my VW was the history of carb ice on
        takeoff on the Teenie Two. It's not a question if you are going to
        get carb ice, but when you will get it. The are so many conitions that
        have to be meet to get it. Some people, some places and some planes
        will never get it. Others will get it almost everyday. When I was
        teaching in the Cessna 150 during the spring I'd get it almost every
        flight in the SF Bay area. On the ground and it the air. I've had
        carb ice on a 90 degree day in the Bell 47 and had it in the 150 on a
        65 degree day.

        Don't play around with it. I'll post a chart I have at work next
        week. It shows the conitions for carb, pressure and injection
        induction ice to occur..
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