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Ibibio-Anang doll

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  • Veronique Martelliere
    Hello Craig ! I just took a look at the pictures and give your dolls ***** . Very good acquisitions, imho. After browsing, I found out that they have an Anang
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 5, 2006
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      Hello Craig !
       
      I just took a look at the pictures and give your dolls ***** . Very good acquisitions, imho.
      After browsing, I found out that they have an Anang accent (as you know, Anang communities are closed to the Ibibio's - with same beliefs & traditions).
       
      The two last dolls, at the bottom of Rand's interesting page, are exactly the type of dolls I was refering to, that can still be found on juju markets today.
       
      As to puppets, what I learnt until now is that they are Ekpe (masculine society) or Ekon (fem society), and have moveable arms - and some also have moveable legs and/or hinged jaw.
       
      Here is a picture of an Ibibio-Anang doll, from the book "Three Rivers of Nigeria".
      I will then send a picture of an Ekong puppet...
      Cheers
      Vero


      Relax. Yahoo! Mail virus scanning helps detect nasty viruses!
    • Craig Lewis
      Hi Vero, I m glad you like my dolls,they are prettier than most things I collect so they re not my usual taste.However I really do love these dolls. Thanks
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 6, 2006
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        Hi Vero,
        I'm glad you like my dolls,they are "prettier" than most things I
        collect so they're not my usual taste.However I really do love these
        dolls.
        Thanks for all the extra information about puppets, there are some
        puppets I've seen that I really would love to have, but I haven't
        really seen any for sale anywhere.
        My interest in this type of doll and puppet is very recent, as I said
        before it was when I "discovered" a puppet in my local museum that
        they had mis-identified. I love the way these dolls and puppets are
        painted and I especially love the expression on the face of the first
        doll of mine that I posted.
        Thanks again,
        Craig
        BTW Thanks again to Rand for doing a great job yet again with his web
        page.

        --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, Veronique Martelliere
        <proximatribal@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hello Craig !
        >
        > I just took a look at the pictures and give your dolls ***** .
        Very good acquisitions, imho.
        > After browsing, I found out that they have an Anang accent (as
        you know, Anang communities are closed to the Ibibio's - with same
        beliefs & traditions).
        >
        > The two last dolls, at the bottom of Rand's interesting page, are
        exactly the type of dolls I was refering to, that can still be found
        on juju markets today.
        >
        > As to puppets, what I learnt until now is that they are Ekpe
        (masculine society) or Ekon (fem society), and have moveable arms -
        and some also have moveable legs and/or hinged jaw.
        >
        > Here is a picture of an Ibibio-Anang doll, from the book "Three
        Rivers of Nigeria".
        > I will then send a picture of an Ekong puppet...
        >
        > Cheers
        > Vero
        >
        >
        > ---------------------------------
        > Relax. Yahoo! Mail virus scanning helps detect nasty viruses!
        >
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