Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

"new" chi wara

Expand Messages
  • joanntilton
    I have read all of the very informative answers regarding my new chi wara and have decided to do nothing. It seems that most of the powedry dust came off as
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 2, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      I have read all of the very informative answers regarding my "new" chi
      wara and have decided to do nothing. It seems that most of the
      powedry dust came off as I handled it. I did go over it with a large,
      soft oriental brush and got most of the dust off. I left some in the
      crevices because I didn't want to possibly disturb the design
      incisions. It looks and feels much bertter. I am very glad that I
      didn't use any oil becaue the appearance is wonderful since I brushed
      it. I wouldn't want to change anything. I am going to let it sit
      still for a while to see if any more powder develops. If it does the
      piece is small enough to put into a plastic bag and freeze it.

      Thank all of you for your interest and help.
      Joann Tilton
    • Antwan Martin
      I didn t read anything about the Chi Waras but I know from experience that if you have piles of saw dust (if you will) under your piece, you have African
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 2, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        I didn't read anything about the Chi Waras but I know from experience that
        if you have piles of saw dust (if you will) under your piece, you have
        African beetles (termites) eating at the inside of your wood. This can be
        cured several ways: I Freeze it (I left a baga Nimba in my freezer for
        7days. I think that 2 would've done the trick. (2) Bake it at a low temp.
        I am afraid to do this. (3) In the winter Leave the piece out side to freeze
        (in a plastic bag ofcourse). I have done this also.

        If you are talking about dust from you home this I misunderstood you. I
        never polish or add linseed oil to any of my items. I leave them natural.
        It makes them look more authentic in my book. I do occasionally dust my
        pieces off at home with a soft towelor a feather suster.



        Twan


        >From: "joanntilton" <jltilton@...>
        >Reply-To: African_Arts@yahoogroups.com
        >To: African_Arts@yahoogroups.com
        >Subject: [African_Arts] "new" chi wara
        >Date: Sun, 02 Oct 2005 16:02:34 -0000
        >
        >I have read all of the very informative answers regarding my "new" chi
        >wara and have decided to do nothing. It seems that most of the
        >powedry dust came off as I handled it. I did go over it with a large,
        >soft oriental brush and got most of the dust off. I left some in the
        >crevices because I didn't want to possibly disturb the design
        >incisions. It looks and feels much bertter. I am very glad that I
        >didn't use any oil becaue the appearance is wonderful since I brushed
        >it. I wouldn't want to change anything. I am going to let it sit
        >still for a while to see if any more powder develops. If it does the
        >piece is small enough to put into a plastic bag and freeze it.
        >
        >Thank all of you for your interest and help.
        >Joann Tilton
        >
        >
        >
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.