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Re: ashanti bronze ?

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  • gi mateusen
    ... I saw there was a comment on the photo, but I can t see the message. Can you send your comment as reply ? Thanks !!!
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 9, 2011
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      --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "gi mateusen" <mateusen@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hello,
      > Can somebody give me more information about this small bronze staff (H 18cm). I suppose it's Ashanti but I'm not sure.
      > Perhaps it was part of a bigger object because there is some damnage at the bottom.
      > I have no idea about the use ...
      > kind regards !
      >
      > you can find a picture in the akan album:
      > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/African_Arts/photos/album/225137092/pic/289291613/view
      >
      I saw there was a comment on the photo, but I can't see the message. Can you send your comment as reply ? Thanks !!!
    • Lee Rubinstein
      Metropolitan Museum of Art, Linguist Staff (Okyeame [sic]) link Gi: As is so frequently the case, it is difficult to offer specific information pertaining to
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 9, 2011
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        linguist staff okyeame|19th–early 20th century|1986.475a-c
        Metropolitan Museum of Art, Linguist Staff (Okyeame [sic]) link

        Gi:

        As is so frequently the case, it is difficult to offer specific information pertaining to the object queried;  however, there is a "web" of potentially related strands for further investigation that may help to illuminate its identity and significance.  Firstly, it is worthwhile to consider that many cultural principles and truths are both embedded in and expressed through various Akan visual and verbal arts.  Linguist staffs (okyeame poma), for instance, variously attributed to Akan, Ashanti and Fante sources simultaneously display a wide variety of images and convey meaningful truths echoed in proverbs.  Although the medium in which your fragment is cast is not consistent with that commonly described as the media in which these staffs are crafted -- gilded wood -- it is possible to extrapolate a similar mechanism through which an oft-repeated proverbial truth is embedded in a material object.  The proverb which comes to mind is "tikoro nnko agyina" (trans:  "One head does not constitute a council.")  It is this message which is reportedly woven into the cloth below:


        The consideration of such a motif in reference to the okyeame poma is particularly apropos as it also points toward the relationship between the chief and his "linguist", who not only serves as an intermediary between a chief and members of his audience but who also articulates, embellishes and -- according to Cole and Ross, fulfills an additional and essential aspect of the responsibility of office assumed by the chief:  "Speaking through a linguist also insures that a chief will not make decisions on his own.  When the chief takes his original oath of office he is admonished never to act without the advice of his counselors." (Herbert M. Cole and Doran H. Ross, The Arts of Ghana.  Los Angeles:  Museum of Cultural History, 1977, p. 158).  Cole and Ross also make reference to the existence of a popular linguist staff motif of three heads representing the tikoro nnko agyina proverb which "reminds the chief to seek the advice of his elders and assures his subjects that he will do so." (p. 162) 

        Whether or not its actual motivation, it is logical and plausible to theorize that such a message is inherent or implicit in the configuration of heads in the fragment which you presented.  Exploration of the wide variety of proverbs portrayed in Ghanaian -- even related Ivoirian -- visual arts -- including the multitude of cast gold weights may reveal additional and more closely related observable examples by which to ascertain the identity and meaning of your object.


        Also, given that the object you have presented is a fragment... worth noting perhaps is the multi-part construction of the linguist staff as portrayed in these images below:
        Linguist’s Staff (Okyeame Poma) - Anonymous
        Dallas Museum of Art, Linguist’s Staff (Okyeame Poma) link

        Cliquez sur l'image pour la visualiser en plein écran

        Musée du quai Branly.  Inventory # 73.1978.2.3


        ADINKRA SYMBOLS (KURONTI NE AKWAMU)





        (Adinkra symbol of tikoro nnko agyina)
        Lee

        On Aug 9, 2011, at 6:28 PM, gi mateusen wrote:

         



        --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "gi mateusen" <mateusen@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hello,
        > Can somebody give me more information about this small bronze staff (H 18cm). I suppose it's Ashanti but I'm not sure.
        > Perhaps it was part of a bigger object because there is some damnage at the bottom.
        > I have no idea about the use ...
        > kind regards !
        >
        > you can find a picture in the akan album:
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/African_Arts/photos/album/225137092/pic/289291613/view
        >
        I saw there was a comment on the photo, but I can't see the message. Can you send your comment as reply ? Thanks !!!


      • Gi Mateusen
        Dear Lee, Thanks for your information. I didn¹t make the link with the linguist staffs, because they are always made in gilded wood, I like the proverbs as
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 10, 2011
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          Re: [African_Arts] Re: ashanti bronze ? Dear Lee,
          Thanks for your information. I didn’t make the link with the linguist staffs, because they are always made in gilded wood,   I like the proverbs as they are also used by the goldweights.

          Gi Mateusen
          mobile: +.32.(0)477.300679
          E-mail: mateusen@...




          Van: Lee Rubinstein <leerubinstein@...>
          Beantwoorden - Aan: <African_Arts@yahoogroups.com>
          Datum: Tue, 09 Aug 2011 21:34:00 -0400
          Aan: <African_Arts@yahoogroups.com>
          Onderwerp: Re: [African_Arts] Re: ashanti bronze ?

          <http://www.metmuseum.org/works_of_art/collection_database/arts_of_africa_oceania_and_the_americas/linguist_staff_okyeame/objectview_enlarge.aspx?page=364&amp;sort=0&amp;sortdir=asc&amp;keyword=&amp;fp=1&amp;dd1=5&amp;dd2=0&amp;vw=1&amp;collID=5&amp;OID=50>
          Metropolitan Museum of Art, Linguist Staff (Okyeame [sic]) link <http://www.metmuseum.org/works_of_art/collection_database/arts_of_africa_oceania_and_the_americas/linguist_staff_okyeame/objectview.aspx?collID=5&amp;OID=50007591>

          Gi:

          As is so frequently the case, it is difficult to offer specific information pertaining to the object queried;  however, there is a "web" of potentially related strands for further investigation that may help to illuminate its identity and significance.  Firstly, it is worthwhile to consider that many cultural principles and truths are both embedded in and expressed through various Akan visual and verbal arts.  Linguist staffs (okyeame poma), for instance, variously attributed to Akan, Ashanti and Fante sources simultaneously display a wide variety of images and convey meaningful truths echoed in proverbs.  Although the medium in which your fragment is cast is not consistent with that commonly described as the media in which these staffs are crafted -- gilded wood -- it is possible to extrapolate a similar mechanism through which an oft-repeated proverbial truth is embedded in a material object.  The proverb which comes to mind is "tikoro nnko agyina" (trans:  "One head does not constitute a council.")  It is this message which is reportedly woven into the cloth below:


          <x-msg://191/>
          http://africa.si.edu/exhibits/kente/strips3.htm

          The consideration of such a motif in reference to the okyeame poma is particularly apropos as it also points toward the relationship between the chief and his "linguist", who not only serves as an intermediary between a chief and members of his audience but who also articulates, embellishes and -- according to Cole and Ross, fulfills an additional and essential aspect of the responsibility of office assumed by the chief:  "Speaking through a linguist also insures that a chief will not make decisions on his own.  When the chief takes his original oath of office he is admonished never to act without the advice of his counselors." (Herbert M. Cole and Doran H. Ross, The Arts of Ghana.  Los Angeles:  Museum of Cultural History, 1977, p. 158).  Cole and Ross also make reference to the existence of a popular linguist staff motif of three heads representing the tikoro nnko agyina proverb which "reminds the chief to seek the advice of his elders and assures his subjects that he will do so." (p. 162)

          Whether or not its actual motivation, it is logical and plausible to theorize that such a message is inherent or implicit in the configuration of heads in the fragment which you presented.  Exploration of the wide variety of proverbs portrayed in Ghanaian -- even related Ivoirian -- visual arts -- including the multitude of cast gold weights may reveal additional and more closely related observable examples by which to ascertain the identity and meaning of your object.


          Also, given that the object you have presented is a fragment... worth noting perhaps is the multi-part construction of the linguist staff as portrayed in these images below:


          Dallas Museum of Art, Linguist’s Staff (Okyeame Poma) link <http://www.framemuseums.org/jsp/fiche_oeuvre.jsp?STNAV=&amp;RUBNAV=&amp;CODE=1289241743014&amp;LANGUE=1&amp;RH=UsaFRAMEMuseums&amp;OBJET_PROVENANCE=COLLECTION>

           <http://www.quaibranly.fr/cc/pod/resultats.aspx?b=1&amp;t=1#>

          Musée du quai Branly.  Inventory # 73.1978.2.3









          (Adinkra symbol of tikoro nnko agyina)
          Lee

          On Aug 9, 2011, at 6:28 PM, gi mateusen wrote:

           


          --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com <mailto:African_Arts%40yahoogroups.com> , "gi mateusen" <mateusen@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hello,
          > Can somebody give me more information about this small bronze staff (H 18cm). I suppose it's Ashanti but I'm not sure.
          > Perhaps it was part of a bigger object because there is some damnage at the bottom.
          > I have no idea about the use ...
          > kind regards !
          >
          > you can find a picture in the akan album:
          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/African_Arts/photos/album/225137092/pic/289291613/view
          >
          I saw there was a comment on the photo, but I can't see the message. Can you send your comment as reply ? Thanks !!!

           
            


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