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Re: A Dinga, Congo, Funeral Mask?

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  • Martin Vorwerk
    Hello Robert, i saw a similiar mask today at bonhams auction site described as a binji mask. you can find it here:
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 28, 2011
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      Hello Robert,

      i saw a similiar mask today at bonhams auction site described as a binji mask. you can find it here:
      http://www.bonhams.com/usa/auction/18574/lot/2115/

      There was another one like this on ebay last october but with no specifications about the tribe. you can find some pictures of it here:

      http://dl.dropbox.com/u/7986842/congo%20mask%20oct.%202010%20ebay.zip

      Best regards and much luck for your search,
      Martin

      --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, anthroarts@... wrote:
      >
      > Lee; thank you very much. I was relating information or misinformation as related to me. Thanks to you and your discussion group, I am learning. Robert.
      >
      > Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: Lee Rubinstein <leerubinstein@...>
      > Sender: African_Arts@yahoogroups.com
      > Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2011 08:46:10
      > To: <African_Arts@yahoogroups.com>
      > Reply-To: African_Arts@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: Re: [African_Arts] A Dinga, Congo, Funeral Mask?
      >
      > Robert:
      >
      > I must admit that I am a little confused by the terms that appear in the title of your album and message! Dinga and Mukungula are places in the Bandundu and Kasai provinces of the DRC and don't specifically refer to any one of the varied cultural traditions in these regions although they may indicate locales of origin or collection. Given these (what I am guessing to be) geographical references and the over-all appearance of the mask as well as its attached elements (feathers and skin [civet?), I am thinking a systematic review of literature regarding Pende masquerade -- especially the minganji -- may be helpful in seeking to determine the origin and significance of the mask. [See, for instance, Zoe Strother's Inventing Masks: Agency and History in the Art of the Central Pende (Chicago: University of Chicago Press. 1998] I imagine that the civet skin is the source of the suggestion that the mask may have royal associations (?), but I am not certain that a survey of literature regarding Pende masquerade will yield a cohesive argument that this mask is indeed a royal one... In any case, it would be necessary, I believe, to seek to locate the mask within a cultural tradition (or complex of related cultural traditions) before seeking to determine the particular classification and affiliation within the range of Pende masks.
      >
      > Lee
      >
      >
      > On Apr 3, 2011, at 7:11 PM, Millers Garage and Cafe wrote:
      >
      > > Can anyone help determine whether the headdress imaged in the photo album entitled "A Dinga, Congo, Funeral Mask - Mukungula"? is indeed a Chieftain's or High-Status Funeral Headdress, Mukungula?
      > >
      > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/African_Arts/photos/album/997424481/pic/list
      > >
      > > thank-you very much.
      > >
      > >
      >
    • tomkocsis
      This mask has no royal relationship. It comes out as a prelude to the ceremonies to cheer people. The dancer is dressed in full raffia clothing wearing the
      Message 2 of 6 , May 1, 2011
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        This mask has no royal relationship. It comes out as a prelude to the
        ceremonies to cheer people. The dancer is dressed in full raffia clothing wearing the headdress and makes "funny" unexpected moves to surprise people and to make them laugh.
        The mask is most likely from the Bakete, a subgroup of the Kuba.(The one on the Bonhams site is certainly Kete). The Bakate live in South-Eastern Kasai near Bandundu next to the Pende Kasai, hence the similarities in their raffia masks.

        Tom



        --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "Martin Vorwerk" <m.vorwerk@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hello Robert,
        >
        > i saw a similiar mask today at bonhams auction site described as a binji mask. you can find it here:
        > http://www.bonhams.com/usa/auction/18574/lot/2115/
        >
        > There was another one like this on ebay last october but with no specifications about the tribe. you can find some pictures of it here:
        >
        > http://dl.dropbox.com/u/7986842/congo%20mask%20oct.%202010%20ebay.zip
        >
        > Best regards and much luck for your search,
        > Martin
        >
        > --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, anthroarts@ wrote:
        > >
        > > Lee; thank you very much. I was relating information or misinformation as related to me. Thanks to you and your discussion group, I am learning. Robert.
        > >
        > > Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry
        > >
        > > -----Original Message-----
        > > From: Lee Rubinstein <leerubinstein@>
        > > Sender: African_Arts@yahoogroups.com
        > > Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2011 08:46:10
        > > To: <African_Arts@yahoogroups.com>
        > > Reply-To: African_Arts@yahoogroups.com
        > > Subject: Re: [African_Arts] A Dinga, Congo, Funeral Mask?
        > >
        > > Robert:
        > >
        > > I must admit that I am a little confused by the terms that appear in the title of your album and message! Dinga and Mukungula are places in the Bandundu and Kasai provinces of the DRC and don't specifically refer to any one of the varied cultural traditions in these regions although they may indicate locales of origin or collection. Given these (what I am guessing to be) geographical references and the over-all appearance of the mask as well as its attached elements (feathers and skin [civet?), I am thinking a systematic review of literature regarding Pende masquerade -- especially the minganji -- may be helpful in seeking to determine the origin and significance of the mask. [See, for instance, Zoe Strother's Inventing Masks: Agency and History in the Art of the Central Pende (Chicago: University of Chicago Press. 1998] I imagine that the civet skin is the source of the suggestion that the mask may have royal associations (?), but I am not certain that a survey of literature regarding Pende masquerade will yield a cohesive argument that this mask is indeed a royal one... In any case, it would be necessary, I believe, to seek to locate the mask within a cultural tradition (or complex of related cultural traditions) before seeking to determine the particular classification and affiliation within the range of Pende masks.
        > >
        > > Lee
        > >
        > >
        > > On Apr 3, 2011, at 7:11 PM, Millers Garage and Cafe wrote:
        > >
        > > > Can anyone help determine whether the headdress imaged in the photo album entitled "A Dinga, Congo, Funeral Mask - Mukungula"? is indeed a Chieftain's or High-Status Funeral Headdress, Mukungula?
        > > >
        > > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/African_Arts/photos/album/997424481/pic/list
        > > >
        > > > thank-you very much.
        > > >
        > > >
        > >
        >
      • christopheevers
        Hi Millers, to me, this has all the characteristics of a mask that has been attributed to the Binji in the literature (see Marc Felix, 100 Peoples of Zaire, or
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 4, 2011
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          Hi Millers,

          to me, this has all the characteristics of a mask that has been attributed to the Binji in the literature (see Marc Felix, 100 Peoples of Zaire, or much before him, Leo Frobenius, Ethnographische Notizen aus den Jahren 1905 und 1906).

          Realty is however that these fiber masks have not really been studied.

          Christophe Evers, Brussels

          --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "Martin Vorwerk" <m.vorwerk@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hello Robert,
          >
          > i saw a similiar mask today at bonhams auction site described as a binji mask. you can find it here:
          > http://www.bonhams.com/usa/auction/18574/lot/2115/
          >
          > There was another one like this on ebay last october but with no specifications about the tribe. you can find some pictures of it here:
          >
          > http://dl.dropbox.com/u/7986842/congo%20mask%20oct.%202010%20ebay.zip
          >
          > Best regards and much luck for your search,
          > Martin
          >
          > --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, anthroarts@ wrote:
          > >
          > > Lee; thank you very much. I was relating information or misinformation as related to me. Thanks to you and your discussion group, I am learning. Robert.
          > >
          > > Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry
          > >
          > > -----Original Message-----
          > > From: Lee Rubinstein <leerubinstein@>
          > > Sender: African_Arts@yahoogroups.com
          > > Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2011 08:46:10
          > > To: <African_Arts@yahoogroups.com>
          > > Reply-To: African_Arts@yahoogroups.com
          > > Subject: Re: [African_Arts] A Dinga, Congo, Funeral Mask?
          > >
          > > Robert:
          > >
          > > I must admit that I am a little confused by the terms that appear in the title of your album and message! Dinga and Mukungula are places in the Bandundu and Kasai provinces of the DRC and don't specifically refer to any one of the varied cultural traditions in these regions although they may indicate locales of origin or collection. Given these (what I am guessing to be) geographical references and the over-all appearance of the mask as well as its attached elements (feathers and skin [civet?), I am thinking a systematic review of literature regarding Pende masquerade -- especially the minganji -- may be helpful in seeking to determine the origin and significance of the mask. [See, for instance, Zoe Strother's Inventing Masks: Agency and History in the Art of the Central Pende (Chicago: University of Chicago Press. 1998] I imagine that the civet skin is the source of the suggestion that the mask may have royal associations (?), but I am not certain that a survey of literature regarding Pende masquerade will yield a cohesive argument that this mask is indeed a royal one... In any case, it would be necessary, I believe, to seek to locate the mask within a cultural tradition (or complex of related cultural traditions) before seeking to determine the particular classification and affiliation within the range of Pende masks.
          > >
          > > Lee
          > >
          > >
          > > On Apr 3, 2011, at 7:11 PM, Millers Garage and Cafe wrote:
          > >
          > > > Can anyone help determine whether the headdress imaged in the photo album entitled "A Dinga, Congo, Funeral Mask - Mukungula"? is indeed a Chieftain's or High-Status Funeral Headdress, Mukungula?
          > > >
          > > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/African_Arts/photos/album/997424481/pic/list
          > > >
          > > > thank-you very much.
          > > >
          > > >
          > >
          >
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