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Goldweights

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  • rpearsonpe
    With special thanks to stellatebronze for asking about Tom Phillips new book on Goldweights. I bought the book, then I dug out my goldweight collection and
    Message 1 of 12 , May 12, 2010
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      With special thanks to 'stellatebronze' for asking about Tom Phillips new book on Goldweights. I bought the book, then I dug out my goldweight collection and have included photos (not of Phillips quality) of the pieces for the groups enjoyment:

      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/African_Arts/photos/album/564328364/pic/list

      A few opinions.

      # 1 Goldweights are a great collection, they are unique, interesting, take up very little volume, and old authentic pieces are still available thru gallerys, dealers, auctions and African Runners alike. Prices can vary from $10 for small geometrics to $100+ for authentic figurative. Note also that the figurative's are also reproduced both new and 'enhanced' (painted. added ring for a 'charm bracelet'), but not so much with the geometric's.

      # 2 I have never understood how a geometric and any figurative gold weight was used to actually weigh gold dust. Most weights I have used on a balance beam scale is 'calibrated' to specific weights (1 gram, 2 grams, etc), but -especially the figurative's- are all different sizes and shapes. I have also seen figurative's with pieces intentionally broken off to 'adjust' the weight, and geometric's with lead (?) added to 'adjust' the weight, but I have no idea what standard the weights are adjusted to meet. Any thoughts on that concept ?

      # 3 It appears any object can be used as a goldweight, or any object from nature (bugs, seeds, etc) used to cast a goldweight. My collection includes odd pieces of brass 'things' used as goldweights. See the photos.

      bob
    • rpearsonpe
      For those interested, Tom Phillips is an artist and has a website at http://tomphillips.co.uk/index.html
      Message 2 of 12 , May 13, 2010
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        For those interested, Tom Phillips is an artist and has a website at
        http://tomphillips.co.uk/index.html

        --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "rpearsonpe" <rpearsonpe@...> wrote:
        >
        > With special thanks to 'stellatebronze' for asking about Tom Phillips new book on Goldweights. I bought the book, then I dug out my goldweight collection and have included photos (not of Phillips quality) of the pieces for the groups enjoyment:
        >
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/African_Arts/photos/album/564328364/pic/list
        >
        > A few opinions.
        >
        > # 1 Goldweights are a great collection, they are unique, interesting, take up very little volume, and old authentic pieces are still available thru gallerys, dealers, auctions and African Runners alike. Prices can vary from $10 for small geometrics to $100+ for authentic figurative. Note also that the figurative's are also reproduced both new and 'enhanced' (painted. added ring for a 'charm bracelet'), but not so much with the geometric's.
        >
        > # 2 I have never understood how a geometric and any figurative gold weight was used to actually weigh gold dust. Most weights I have used on a balance beam scale is 'calibrated' to specific weights (1 gram, 2 grams, etc), but -especially the figurative's- are all different sizes and shapes. I have also seen figurative's with pieces intentionally broken off to 'adjust' the weight, and geometric's with lead (?) added to 'adjust' the weight, but I have no idea what standard the weights are adjusted to meet. Any thoughts on that concept ?
        >
        > # 3 It appears any object can be used as a goldweight, or any object from nature (bugs, seeds, etc) used to cast a goldweight. My collection includes odd pieces of brass 'things' used as goldweights. See the photos.
        >
        > bob
        >
      • mateusen1
        I will send some photo s of a selection of goldweights in my collection (almost 2000 pieces) I m still looking for good pieces to buy or for exchange kind
        Message 3 of 12 , May 13, 2010
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          I will send some photo's of a selection of goldweights in my collection (almost 2000 pieces)
          I'm still looking for good pieces to buy or for exchange
          kind regards

          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/African_Arts/photos/album/1966142130/pic/list

          --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "rpearsonpe" <rpearsonpe@...> wrote:
          >
          > With special thanks to 'stellatebronze' for asking about Tom Phillips new book on Goldweights. I bought the book, then I dug out my goldweight collection and have included photos (not of Phillips quality) of the pieces for the groups enjoyment:
          >
          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/African_Arts/photos/album/564328364/pic/list
          >
          > A few opinions.
          >
          > # 1 Goldweights are a great collection, they are unique, interesting, take up very little volume, and old authentic pieces are still available thru gallerys, dealers, auctions and African Runners alike. Prices can vary from $10 for small geometrics to $100+ for authentic figurative. Note also that the figurative's are also reproduced both new and 'enhanced' (painted. added ring for a 'charm bracelet'), but not so much with the geometric's.
          >
          > # 2 I have never understood how a geometric and any figurative gold weight was used to actually weigh gold dust. Most weights I have used on a balance beam scale is 'calibrated' to specific weights (1 gram, 2 grams, etc), but -especially the figurative's- are all different sizes and shapes. I have also seen figurative's with pieces intentionally broken off to 'adjust' the weight, and geometric's with lead (?) added to 'adjust' the weight, but I have no idea what standard the weights are adjusted to meet. Any thoughts on that concept ?
          >
          > # 3 It appears any object can be used as a goldweight, or any object from nature (bugs, seeds, etc) used to cast a goldweight. My collection includes odd pieces of brass 'things' used as goldweights. See the photos.
          >
          > bob
          >
        • rpearsonpe
          For those readers who do not have access to Tom Phillips book, or even if you do, the goldweight collection of mateusen1 is worth looking at. Many
          Message 4 of 12 , May 14, 2010
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            For those readers who do not have access to Tom Phillips book, or even if you do, the goldweight collection of "mateusen1" is worth looking at. Many figurative and geometrics. Good photos. Two thousand pieces!! A serious collector !
            Now if she/he would add brilliant descriptions, sizes, prices paid or price if interested in selling part of the hoard. And if you know what Tom was talking about for 'blowing grit away from the gold dust'.

            AND maybe we need to remember in mentioning having 'goldweights' in public to make the point crystal clear that they are brass weights for weighing gold and NOT gold.
            Keeps the perps from breaking and entering.


            --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "mateusen1" <mateusen@...> wrote:
            >
            > I will send some photo's of a selection of goldweights in my collection (almost 2000 pieces)
            > I'm still looking for good pieces to buy or for exchange
            > kind regards
            >
            > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/African_Arts/photos/album/1966142130/pic/list
            >
            > --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "rpearsonpe" <rpearsonpe@> wrote:
            > >
            > > With special thanks to 'stellatebronze' for asking about Tom Phillips new book on Goldweights. I bought the book, then I dug out my goldweight collection and have included photos (not of Phillips quality) of the pieces for the groups enjoyment:
            > >
            > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/African_Arts/photos/album/564328364/pic/list
            > >
            > > A few opinions.
            > >
            > > # 1 Goldweights are a great collection, they are unique, interesting, take up very little volume, and old authentic pieces are still available thru gallerys, dealers, auctions and African Runners alike. Prices can vary from $10 for small geometrics to $100+ for authentic figurative. Note also that the figurative's are also reproduced both new and 'enhanced' (painted. added ring for a 'charm bracelet'), but not so much with the geometric's.
            > >
            > > # 2 I have never understood how a geometric and any figurative gold weight was used to actually weigh gold dust. Most weights I have used on a balance beam scale is 'calibrated' to specific weights (1 gram, 2 grams, etc), but -especially the figurative's- are all different sizes and shapes. I have also seen figurative's with pieces intentionally broken off to 'adjust' the weight, and geometric's with lead (?) added to 'adjust' the weight, but I have no idea what standard the weights are adjusted to meet. Any thoughts on that concept ?
            > >
            > > # 3 It appears any object can be used as a goldweight, or any object from nature (bugs, seeds, etc) used to cast a goldweight. My collection includes odd pieces of brass 'things' used as goldweights. See the photos.
            > >
            > > bob
            > >
            >
          • stellatebronze
            Hello, if you can find it TIMOTHY F GARRARD s book on AKAN WEIGHTS AND THE GOLD TRADE is a tremendous resource. He also wrote an article called Myth &
            Message 5 of 12 , May 14, 2010
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              Hello, if you can find it TIMOTHY F GARRARD's book on AKAN WEIGHTS AND THE GOLD TRADE is a tremendous resource. He also wrote an article called Myth & METROLOGY: THE EARLY TRANS-SAHARAN TRADE in the Journal of African History 23 (4) 1982 pp 443-461. Garrard discusses the different gold-weight standards that developed over the centuries of trans-Saharan trade, and explains in great detail the traditions of casting goldweights.

              I mentioned recently I chanced upon a collection of African art wherein the bulk of the wood-carving was "made for trade", whereas the metal-work appeared quite authentic, which was because of the a friendship between Garrad and the collector. This collection included many, many goldweights. Parts of this collection will be placed on auction at an auctionhouse named Sloans & Kenyon. I will try a bit later to post images of the 20 or so items I purchased to give you an idea of the quality of the metal items. Many of the pieces were taken by the Smithsonian, and the rest the family is looking to sell.


              --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "rpearsonpe" <rpearsonpe@...> wrote:
              >
              > With special thanks to 'stellatebronze' for asking about Tom Phillips new book on Goldweights. I bought the book, then I dug out my goldweight collection and have included photos (not of Phillips quality) of the pieces for the groups enjoyment:
              >
              > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/African_Arts/photos/album/564328364/pic/list
              >
              > A few opinions.
              >
              > # 1 Goldweights are a great collection, they are unique, interesting, take up very little volume, and old authentic pieces are still available thru gallerys, dealers, auctions and African Runners alike. Prices can vary from $10 for small geometrics to $100+ for authentic figurative. Note also that the figurative's are also reproduced both new and 'enhanced' (painted. added ring for a 'charm bracelet'), but not so much with the geometric's.
              >
              > # 2 I have never understood how a geometric and any figurative gold weight was used to actually weigh gold dust. Most weights I have used on a balance beam scale is 'calibrated' to specific weights (1 gram, 2 grams, etc), but -especially the figurative's- are all different sizes and shapes. I have also seen figurative's with pieces intentionally broken off to 'adjust' the weight, and geometric's with lead (?) added to 'adjust' the weight, but I have no idea what standard the weights are adjusted to meet. Any thoughts on that concept ?
              >
              > # 3 It appears any object can be used as a goldweight, or any object from nature (bugs, seeds, etc) used to cast a goldweight. My collection includes odd pieces of brass 'things' used as goldweights. See the photos.
              >
              > bob
              >
            • mateusen1
              Hello,Ì m always looking for good pieces, can you bring me in contact with that family if they still have goldweights ?
              Message 6 of 12 , May 15, 2010
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                Hello,Ì'm always looking for good pieces, can you bring me in contact with that family if they still have goldweights ?

                --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "stellatebronze" <stellatebronze@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hello, if you can find it TIMOTHY F GARRARD's book on AKAN WEIGHTS AND THE GOLD TRADE is a tremendous resource. He also wrote an article called Myth & METROLOGY: THE EARLY TRANS-SAHARAN TRADE in the Journal of African History 23 (4) 1982 pp 443-461. Garrard discusses the different gold-weight standards that developed over the centuries of trans-Saharan trade, and explains in great detail the traditions of casting goldweights.
                >
                > I mentioned recently I chanced upon a collection of African art wherein the bulk of the wood-carving was "made for trade", whereas the metal-work appeared quite authentic, which was because of the a friendship between Garrad and the collector. This collection included many, many goldweights. Parts of this collection will be placed on auction at an auctionhouse named Sloans & Kenyon. I will try a bit later to post images of the 20 or so items I purchased to give you an idea of the quality of the metal items. Many of the pieces were taken by the Smithsonian, and the rest the family is looking to sell.
                >
                >
                > --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "rpearsonpe" <rpearsonpe@> wrote:
                > >
                > > With special thanks to 'stellatebronze' for asking about Tom Phillips new book on Goldweights. I bought the book, then I dug out my goldweight collection and have included photos (not of Phillips quality) of the pieces for the groups enjoyment:
                > >
                > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/African_Arts/photos/album/564328364/pic/list
                > >
                > > A few opinions.
                > >
                > > # 1 Goldweights are a great collection, they are unique, interesting, take up very little volume, and old authentic pieces are still available thru gallerys, dealers, auctions and African Runners alike. Prices can vary from $10 for small geometrics to $100+ for authentic figurative. Note also that the figurative's are also reproduced both new and 'enhanced' (painted. added ring for a 'charm bracelet'), but not so much with the geometric's.
                > >
                > > # 2 I have never understood how a geometric and any figurative gold weight was used to actually weigh gold dust. Most weights I have used on a balance beam scale is 'calibrated' to specific weights (1 gram, 2 grams, etc), but -especially the figurative's- are all different sizes and shapes. I have also seen figurative's with pieces intentionally broken off to 'adjust' the weight, and geometric's with lead (?) added to 'adjust' the weight, but I have no idea what standard the weights are adjusted to meet. Any thoughts on that concept ?
                > >
                > > # 3 It appears any object can be used as a goldweight, or any object from nature (bugs, seeds, etc) used to cast a goldweight. My collection includes odd pieces of brass 'things' used as goldweights. See the photos.
                > >
                > > bob
                > >
                >
              • stellatebronze
                hello, the family still has many goldweights, but the actual owner is in her early 80 s and has deferred the disposition of the collection to her children. I
                Message 7 of 12 , May 18, 2010
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                  hello, the family still has many goldweights, but the actual owner is in her early 80's and has deferred the disposition of the collection to her children. I didn't list the actual name of the owner because I already had offered to refer collectors, which was refused (to my surprise). So apparently the material will not be available until Sept auction at the same auction house.

                  --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "mateusen1" <mateusen@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hello,Ì'm always looking for good pieces, can you bring me in contact with that family if they still have goldweights ?
                  >
                  > --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "stellatebronze" <stellatebronze@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Hello, if you can find it TIMOTHY F GARRARD's book on AKAN WEIGHTS AND THE GOLD TRADE is a tremendous resource. He also wrote an article called Myth & METROLOGY: THE EARLY TRANS-SAHARAN TRADE in the Journal of African History 23 (4) 1982 pp 443-461. Garrard discusses the different gold-weight standards that developed over the centuries of trans-Saharan trade, and explains in great detail the traditions of casting goldweights.
                  > >
                  > > I mentioned recently I chanced upon a collection of African art wherein the bulk of the wood-carving was "made for trade", whereas the metal-work appeared quite authentic, which was because of the a friendship between Garrad and the collector. This collection included many, many goldweights. Parts of this collection will be placed on auction at an auctionhouse named Sloans & Kenyon. I will try a bit later to post images of the 20 or so items I purchased to give you an idea of the quality of the metal items. Many of the pieces were taken by the Smithsonian, and the rest the family is looking to sell.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "rpearsonpe" <rpearsonpe@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > With special thanks to 'stellatebronze' for asking about Tom Phillips new book on Goldweights. I bought the book, then I dug out my goldweight collection and have included photos (not of Phillips quality) of the pieces for the groups enjoyment:
                  > > >
                  > > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/African_Arts/photos/album/564328364/pic/list
                  > > >
                  > > > A few opinions.
                  > > >
                  > > > # 1 Goldweights are a great collection, they are unique, interesting, take up very little volume, and old authentic pieces are still available thru gallerys, dealers, auctions and African Runners alike. Prices can vary from $10 for small geometrics to $100+ for authentic figurative. Note also that the figurative's are also reproduced both new and 'enhanced' (painted. added ring for a 'charm bracelet'), but not so much with the geometric's.
                  > > >
                  > > > # 2 I have never understood how a geometric and any figurative gold weight was used to actually weigh gold dust. Most weights I have used on a balance beam scale is 'calibrated' to specific weights (1 gram, 2 grams, etc), but -especially the figurative's- are all different sizes and shapes. I have also seen figurative's with pieces intentionally broken off to 'adjust' the weight, and geometric's with lead (?) added to 'adjust' the weight, but I have no idea what standard the weights are adjusted to meet. Any thoughts on that concept ?
                  > > >
                  > > > # 3 It appears any object can be used as a goldweight, or any object from nature (bugs, seeds, etc) used to cast a goldweight. My collection includes odd pieces of brass 'things' used as goldweights. See the photos.
                  > > >
                  > > > bob
                  > > >
                  > >
                  >
                • rpearsonpe
                  If you have contact information for Sloans & Kenyon or the auction, I would appreciate it as I have found nothing yet. And- of course- photos of your 20
                  Message 8 of 12 , Jun 2, 2010
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                    If you have contact information for Sloans & Kenyon or the auction, I would appreciate it as I have found nothing yet. And- of course- photos of your 20 pieces.
                    I also did a search for the Garrard book. It is apparently rare and hard to find except for some library copies in Mass.

                    bob

                    --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "stellatebronze" <stellatebronze@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Hello, if you can find it TIMOTHY F GARRARD's book on AKAN WEIGHTS AND THE GOLD TRADE is a tremendous resource. He also wrote an article called Myth & METROLOGY: THE EARLY TRANS-SAHARAN TRADE in the Journal of African History 23 (4) 1982 pp 443-461. Garrard discusses the different gold-weight standards that developed over the centuries of trans-Saharan trade, and explains in great detail the traditions of casting goldweights.
                    >
                    > I mentioned recently I chanced upon a collection of African art wherein the bulk of the wood-carving was "made for trade", whereas the metal-work appeared quite authentic, which was because of the a friendship between Garrad and the collector. This collection included many, many goldweights. Parts of this collection will be placed on auction at an auctionhouse named Sloans & Kenyon. I will try a bit later to post images of the 20 or so items I purchased to give you an idea of the quality of the metal items. Many of the pieces were taken by the Smithsonian, and the rest the family is looking to sell.
                    >
                    >
                    > --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "rpearsonpe" <rpearsonpe@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > With special thanks to 'stellatebronze' for asking about Tom Phillips new book on Goldweights. I bought the book, then I dug out my goldweight collection and have included photos (not of Phillips quality) of the pieces for the groups enjoyment:
                    > >
                    > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/African_Arts/photos/album/564328364/pic/list
                    > >
                    > > A few opinions.
                    > >
                    > > # 1 Goldweights are a great collection, they are unique, interesting, take up very little volume, and old authentic pieces are still available thru gallerys, dealers, auctions and African Runners alike. Prices can vary from $10 for small geometrics to $100+ for authentic figurative. Note also that the figurative's are also reproduced both new and 'enhanced' (painted. added ring for a 'charm bracelet'), but not so much with the geometric's.
                    > >
                    > > # 2 I have never understood how a geometric and any figurative gold weight was used to actually weigh gold dust. Most weights I have used on a balance beam scale is 'calibrated' to specific weights (1 gram, 2 grams, etc), but -especially the figurative's- are all different sizes and shapes. I have also seen figurative's with pieces intentionally broken off to 'adjust' the weight, and geometric's with lead (?) added to 'adjust' the weight, but I have no idea what standard the weights are adjusted to meet. Any thoughts on that concept ?
                    > >
                    > > # 3 It appears any object can be used as a goldweight, or any object from nature (bugs, seeds, etc) used to cast a goldweight. My collection includes odd pieces of brass 'things' used as goldweights. See the photos.
                    > >
                    > > bob
                    > >
                    >
                  • stellatebronze
                    Hello, sorry for the delay. I have learned that the Sloans & Kenyon Auction is being pushed back until October. I believe their website is
                    Message 9 of 12 , Jun 17, 2010
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                      Hello, sorry for the delay. I have learned that the Sloans & Kenyon Auction is being pushed back until October. I believe their website is www.sloansandkenyon.com. I will send some images I took the day of my visit to the collection. As I do not collect goldweights, the images may not be of interest I am afraid.

                      --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "rpearsonpe" <rpearsonpe@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > If you have contact information for Sloans & Kenyon or the auction, I would appreciate it as I have found nothing yet. And- of course- photos of your 20 pieces.
                      > I also did a search for the Garrard book. It is apparently rare and hard to find except for some library copies in Mass.
                      >
                      > bob
                      >
                      > --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "stellatebronze" <stellatebronze@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Hello, if you can find it TIMOTHY F GARRARD's book on AKAN WEIGHTS AND THE GOLD TRADE is a tremendous resource. He also wrote an article called Myth & METROLOGY: THE EARLY TRANS-SAHARAN TRADE in the Journal of African History 23 (4) 1982 pp 443-461. Garrard discusses the different gold-weight standards that developed over the centuries of trans-Saharan trade, and explains in great detail the traditions of casting goldweights.
                      > >
                      > > I mentioned recently I chanced upon a collection of African art wherein the bulk of the wood-carving was "made for trade", whereas the metal-work appeared quite authentic, which was because of the a friendship between Garrad and the collector. This collection included many, many goldweights. Parts of this collection will be placed on auction at an auctionhouse named Sloans & Kenyon. I will try a bit later to post images of the 20 or so items I purchased to give you an idea of the quality of the metal items. Many of the pieces were taken by the Smithsonian, and the rest the family is looking to sell.
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "rpearsonpe" <rpearsonpe@> wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > > With special thanks to 'stellatebronze' for asking about Tom Phillips new book on Goldweights. I bought the book, then I dug out my goldweight collection and have included photos (not of Phillips quality) of the pieces for the groups enjoyment:
                      > > >
                      > > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/African_Arts/photos/album/564328364/pic/list
                      > > >
                      > > > A few opinions.
                      > > >
                      > > > # 1 Goldweights are a great collection, they are unique, interesting, take up very little volume, and old authentic pieces are still available thru gallerys, dealers, auctions and African Runners alike. Prices can vary from $10 for small geometrics to $100+ for authentic figurative. Note also that the figurative's are also reproduced both new and 'enhanced' (painted. added ring for a 'charm bracelet'), but not so much with the geometric's.
                      > > >
                      > > > # 2 I have never understood how a geometric and any figurative gold weight was used to actually weigh gold dust. Most weights I have used on a balance beam scale is 'calibrated' to specific weights (1 gram, 2 grams, etc), but -especially the figurative's- are all different sizes and shapes. I have also seen figurative's with pieces intentionally broken off to 'adjust' the weight, and geometric's with lead (?) added to 'adjust' the weight, but I have no idea what standard the weights are adjusted to meet. Any thoughts on that concept ?
                      > > >
                      > > > # 3 It appears any object can be used as a goldweight, or any object from nature (bugs, seeds, etc) used to cast a goldweight. My collection includes odd pieces of brass 'things' used as goldweights. See the photos.
                      > > >
                      > > > bob
                      > > >
                      > >
                      >
                    • Lee Rubinstein
                      Images Scott has forwarded have been uploaded to an album and can be viewed via this link:
                      Message 10 of 12 , Jun 17, 2010
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                        Images Scott has forwarded have been uploaded to an album and can be viewed via this link:


                        Lee

                        On Jun 17, 2010, at 1:24 PM, stellatebronze wrote:

                        Hello, sorry for the delay. I have learned that the Sloans & Kenyon Auction is being pushed back until October. I believe their website iswww.sloansandkenyon.com. I will send some images I took the day of my visit to the collection. As I do not collect goldweights, the images may not be of interest I am afraid. 

                        --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "rpearsonpe" <rpearsonpe@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > If you have contact information for Sloans & Kenyon or the auction, I would appreciate it as I have found nothing yet. And- of course- photos of your 20 pieces. 
                        > I also did a search for the Garrard book. It is apparently rare and hard to find except for some library copies in Mass.
                        > 
                        > bob
                        > 
                        > --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "stellatebronze" <stellatebronze@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > Hello, if you can find it TIMOTHY F GARRARD's book on AKAN WEIGHTS AND THE GOLD TRADE is a tremendous resource. He also wrote an article called Myth & METROLOGY: THE EARLY TRANS-SAHARAN TRADE in the Journal of African History 23 (4) 1982 pp 443-461. Garrard discusses the different gold-weight standards that developed over the centuries of trans-Saharan trade, and explains in great detail the traditions of casting goldweights.
                        > > 
                        > > I mentioned recently I chanced upon a collection of African art wherein the bulk of the wood-carving was "made for trade", whereas the metal-work appeared quite authentic, which was because of the a friendship between Garrad and the collector. This collection included many, many goldweights. Parts of this collection will be placed on auction at an auctionhouse named Sloans & Kenyon. I will try a bit later to post images of the 20 or so items I purchased to give you an idea of the quality of the metal items. Many of the pieces were taken by the Smithsonian, and the rest the family is looking to sell.
                        > > 
                        > > 
                        > > --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "rpearsonpe" <rpearsonpe@> wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > With special thanks to 'stellatebronze' for asking about Tom Phillips new book on Goldweights. I bought the book, then I dug out my goldweight collection and have included photos (not of Phillips quality) of the pieces for the groups enjoyment:
                        > > > 
                        > > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/African_Arts/photos/album/564328364/pic/list
                        > > > 
                        > > > A few opinions.
                        > > > 
                        > > > # 1 Goldweights are a great collection, they are unique, interesting, take up very little volume, and old authentic pieces are still available thru gallerys, dealers, auctions and African Runners alike. Prices can vary from $10 for small geometrics to $100+ for authentic figurative. Note also that the figurative's are also reproduced both new and 'enhanced' (painted. added ring for a 'charm bracelet'), but not so much with the geometric's.
                        > > > 
                        > > > # 2 I have never understood how a geometric and any figurative gold weight was used to actually weigh gold dust. Most weights I have used on a balance beam scale is 'calibrated' to specific weights (1 gram, 2 grams, etc), but -especially the figurative's- are all different sizes and shapes. I have also seen figurative's with pieces intentionally broken off to 'adjust' the weight, and geometric's with lead (?) added to 'adjust' the weight, but I have no idea what standard the weights are adjusted to meet. Any thoughts on that concept ?
                        > > > 
                        > > > # 3 It appears any object can be used as a goldweight, or any object from nature (bugs, seeds, etc) used to cast a goldweight. My collection includes odd pieces of brass 'things' used as goldweights. See the photos.
                        > > > 
                        > > > bob
                        > > >
                        > >
                        >


                      • rpearsonpe
                        Your information is alwyas appreciated. The S&K auction site only had postings thru June, but a good follow up is in the future. BTW are you Scott ; Lee
                        Message 11 of 12 , Jun 18, 2010
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                          Your information is alwyas appreciated. The S&K auction site only had postings thru June, but a good follow up is in the future.
                          BTW are you 'Scott'; Lee published some gold weight photos for a Scott ? Some of the photos looked more like bronze bracelets.

                          bob

                          --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "stellatebronze" <stellatebronze@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Hello, sorry for the delay. I have learned that the Sloans & Kenyon Auction is being pushed back until October. I believe their website is www.sloansandkenyon.com. I will send some images I took the day of my visit to the collection. As I do not collect goldweights, the images may not be of interest I am afraid.
                          >
                          > --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "rpearsonpe" <rpearsonpe@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > If you have contact information for Sloans & Kenyon or the auction, I would appreciate it as I have found nothing yet. And- of course- photos of your 20 pieces.
                          > > I also did a search for the Garrard book. It is apparently rare and hard to find except for some library copies in Mass.
                          > >
                          > > bob
                          > >
                          > > --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "stellatebronze" <stellatebronze@> wrote:
                          > > >
                          > > > Hello, if you can find it TIMOTHY F GARRARD's book on AKAN WEIGHTS AND THE GOLD TRADE is a tremendous resource. He also wrote an article called Myth & METROLOGY: THE EARLY TRANS-SAHARAN TRADE in the Journal of African History 23 (4) 1982 pp 443-461. Garrard discusses the different gold-weight standards that developed over the centuries of trans-Saharan trade, and explains in great detail the traditions of casting goldweights.
                          > > >
                          > > > I mentioned recently I chanced upon a collection of African art wherein the bulk of the wood-carving was "made for trade", whereas the metal-work appeared quite authentic, which was because of the a friendship between Garrad and the collector. This collection included many, many goldweights. Parts of this collection will be placed on auction at an auctionhouse named Sloans & Kenyon. I will try a bit later to post images of the 20 or so items I purchased to give you an idea of the quality of the metal items. Many of the pieces were taken by the Smithsonian, and the rest the family is looking to sell.
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > > --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "rpearsonpe" <rpearsonpe@> wrote:
                          > > > >
                          > > > > With special thanks to 'stellatebronze' for asking about Tom Phillips new book on Goldweights. I bought the book, then I dug out my goldweight collection and have included photos (not of Phillips quality) of the pieces for the groups enjoyment:
                          > > > >
                          > > > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/African_Arts/photos/album/564328364/pic/list
                          > > > >
                          > > > > A few opinions.
                          > > > >
                          > > > > # 1 Goldweights are a great collection, they are unique, interesting, take up very little volume, and old authentic pieces are still available thru gallerys, dealers, auctions and African Runners alike. Prices can vary from $10 for small geometrics to $100+ for authentic figurative. Note also that the figurative's are also reproduced both new and 'enhanced' (painted. added ring for a 'charm bracelet'), but not so much with the geometric's.
                          > > > >
                          > > > > # 2 I have never understood how a geometric and any figurative gold weight was used to actually weigh gold dust. Most weights I have used on a balance beam scale is 'calibrated' to specific weights (1 gram, 2 grams, etc), but -especially the figurative's- are all different sizes and shapes. I have also seen figurative's with pieces intentionally broken off to 'adjust' the weight, and geometric's with lead (?) added to 'adjust' the weight, but I have no idea what standard the weights are adjusted to meet. Any thoughts on that concept ?
                          > > > >
                          > > > > # 3 It appears any object can be used as a goldweight, or any object from nature (bugs, seeds, etc) used to cast a goldweight. My collection includes odd pieces of brass 'things' used as goldweights. See the photos.
                          > > > >
                          > > > > bob
                          > > > >
                          > > >
                          > >
                          >
                        • stellatebronze
                          Hello, thanks Lee for posting the images for me. I wanted to clarify that I do NOT collect goldweights which explains why you only see one or two in the
                          Message 12 of 12 , Jun 18, 2010
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                            Hello, thanks Lee for posting the images for me. I wanted to clarify that I do NOT collect goldweights which explains why you only see one or two in the photos. However, I did see several hundred during my visit. These goldweights will be available at auction at Sloans & Kenyon in the fall, I understand. Sorry for the confusion.

                            --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "rpearsonpe" <rpearsonpe@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Your information is alwyas appreciated. The S&K auction site only had postings thru June, but a good follow up is in the future.
                            > BTW are you 'Scott'; Lee published some gold weight photos for a Scott ? Some of the photos looked more like bronze bracelets.
                            >
                            > bob
                            >
                            > --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "stellatebronze" <stellatebronze@> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > Hello, sorry for the delay. I have learned that the Sloans & Kenyon Auction is being pushed back until October. I believe their website is www.sloansandkenyon.com. I will send some images I took the day of my visit to the collection. As I do not collect goldweights, the images may not be of interest I am afraid.
                            > >
                            > > --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "rpearsonpe" <rpearsonpe@> wrote:
                            > > >
                            > > > If you have contact information for Sloans & Kenyon or the auction, I would appreciate it as I have found nothing yet. And- of course- photos of your 20 pieces.
                            > > > I also did a search for the Garrard book. It is apparently rare and hard to find except for some library copies in Mass.
                            > > >
                            > > > bob
                            > > >
                            > > > --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "stellatebronze" <stellatebronze@> wrote:
                            > > > >
                            > > > > Hello, if you can find it TIMOTHY F GARRARD's book on AKAN WEIGHTS AND THE GOLD TRADE is a tremendous resource. He also wrote an article called Myth & METROLOGY: THE EARLY TRANS-SAHARAN TRADE in the Journal of African History 23 (4) 1982 pp 443-461. Garrard discusses the different gold-weight standards that developed over the centuries of trans-Saharan trade, and explains in great detail the traditions of casting goldweights.
                            > > > >
                            > > > > I mentioned recently I chanced upon a collection of African art wherein the bulk of the wood-carving was "made for trade", whereas the metal-work appeared quite authentic, which was because of the a friendship between Garrad and the collector. This collection included many, many goldweights. Parts of this collection will be placed on auction at an auctionhouse named Sloans & Kenyon. I will try a bit later to post images of the 20 or so items I purchased to give you an idea of the quality of the metal items. Many of the pieces were taken by the Smithsonian, and the rest the family is looking to sell.
                            > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > > > --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "rpearsonpe" <rpearsonpe@> wrote:
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > With special thanks to 'stellatebronze' for asking about Tom Phillips new book on Goldweights. I bought the book, then I dug out my goldweight collection and have included photos (not of Phillips quality) of the pieces for the groups enjoyment:
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/African_Arts/photos/album/564328364/pic/list
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > A few opinions.
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > # 1 Goldweights are a great collection, they are unique, interesting, take up very little volume, and old authentic pieces are still available thru gallerys, dealers, auctions and African Runners alike. Prices can vary from $10 for small geometrics to $100+ for authentic figurative. Note also that the figurative's are also reproduced both new and 'enhanced' (painted. added ring for a 'charm bracelet'), but not so much with the geometric's.
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > # 2 I have never understood how a geometric and any figurative gold weight was used to actually weigh gold dust. Most weights I have used on a balance beam scale is 'calibrated' to specific weights (1 gram, 2 grams, etc), but -especially the figurative's- are all different sizes and shapes. I have also seen figurative's with pieces intentionally broken off to 'adjust' the weight, and geometric's with lead (?) added to 'adjust' the weight, but I have no idea what standard the weights are adjusted to meet. Any thoughts on that concept ?
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > # 3 It appears any object can be used as a goldweight, or any object from nature (bugs, seeds, etc) used to cast a goldweight. My collection includes odd pieces of brass 'things' used as goldweights. See the photos.
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > bob
                            > > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > >
                            > >
                            >
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