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Re: African Sculpture and Sports Trivia? [2 Attachments]

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  • dileepmehta39
    I have a figure that goes well with this stick!It has one advantage over the stick-- the soccer player is wearing a Zamble mask: so it is definitely meant for
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 13, 2009
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      I have a figure that goes well with this stick!It has one advantage over the stick-- the soccer player is wearing a Zamble mask: so it is definitely meant for the Guro people; amd so far friends who have seen it are not concerned about it being "real".
      Photo under the name "Guro soccer player":

      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/African_Arts/photos/album/1289009144/pic/266393604/view?


      --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, Bob Ibold <bob.ibold@...> wrote:
      >
      > John,
      > I love your beautiful walking stick. It's about as African as you can
      > get in carving style and color. In contrast, most African art you see
      > in the marketplace is intended for sale to Western collectors--
      > traditional in style, earthy in color, and artificially aged.
      > Bob
      >
      >
      > At 02:27 PM 10/12/2009, you wrote:
      > >Our current discussion of authenticity has reminded me that there's
      > >a piece I've
      > >been meaning to share with the group in hopes of finding out a bit more about
      > >it. It's a figural swagger-stick, painted in enamel and sculpted in a style
      > >that to me looks pretty clearly Akan. As you can see in the
      > >pictures, it shows
      > >two soccer players, a drum, and an elephant holding a soccer
      > >ball. Through some
      > >internet research, I've learned that the Ivoirian national soccer team is the
      > >Elephants, which given the Akan style of the carving makes sense. The
      > >Elephants' team colors, however, are very different from the colors on the
      > >jerseys of the two players depicted on the stick.
      > >
      > >Does anyone in the group know enough about African football to identify these
      > >uniforms? Are they just fantasies? Or are they meant to represent specific
      > >local or regional teams in Cote d'Ivoire? I know that the bottom player is a
      > >goalie, but that's about the extent of my knowledge.
      > >
      > >Also, from an authenticity perspective, I think this object is an interesting
      > >"borderline" case. Formally, its handle is totally non-traditional,
      > >and in fact
      > >directly borrows from the sculpted "Afro-kitsch" walking sticks that are so
      > >common in the tourist market; iconographically, though, this is
      > >quite different
      > >from the usual "souvenir cane." The piece also has some clear signs of use,
      > >including a lot of telephone patina on the handle and rubbing wear
      > >on its foot,
      > >presumably from having actually been used. Does that use, coupled with its
      > >identifiably "Akan" style, make it a candidate for authenticity? If we dodge
      > >this question by calling the piece "folk art," as I suspect many dealers would
      > >do, what do we mean by this new term?
      > >
      > >John Monroe
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >------------------------------------
      > >
      > >African Arts and Culture Discussion Group
      > >
      > >*Website for the group: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/African_Arts/
      > >
      > >*Photos folder for the group:
      > >http://ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/African_Arts/photos
      > >
      > >*Message archives for the group:
      > >http://groups.yahoo.com/group/African_Arts/messages
      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
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