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Re: [African_Arts] Re: Any ideas?

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  • Rand African Art
    Hi Craig, Your figure doesn t ring a bell with me, but I will keep my eyes peeled as I look through books in the near future to see if I can find anything
    Message 1 of 10 , Aug 10, 2005
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      Hi Craig,
      Your figure doesn't ring a bell with me, but I will keep my eyes peeled as I look through books in the near future to see if I can find anything similar. The size of the figure helps, at only around 3" it does meet the criteria for the figures used in some divination practices like you mentioned.
      Cheers!
      RAND
      Craig Lewis <craig_n_emma@...> wrote:
      Jean Pierre,
      thanks for your suggestion. I was thinking something like Songye or
      Hemba but Lwalwa is something I hadn't thought of.
      I have tried looking for some Lwalwa figures but have only seen a 7
      1/2 inch(twice the size of mine) friction oracle kind of figure. Do
      you think mine could be the same kind of thing?
      If you have anything else you can add to your attribution or examples
      of anythig similar I would be very happy to hear from you.
      Thanks again,
      Craig     



      --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, Bouillie Jean-Pierre
      <bouiliejp@y...> wrote:
      > Craig,
      > May-be Lwalwa.It's a magic one.
      > Best
      > Jean-Pierre
      >
      >
      > Craig Lewis <craig_n_emma@y...> a écrit :
      > Hi Group,
      > any comments or input about a figure I have posted in the photo
      section
      > (craig) would be greatly appreciated.
      >
      >
      http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group/african_arts/lst?.dir=/craig&.src
      =gr&.order=&.view=t&.done=http%3a//briefcase.yahoo.com/
      >
      > The figure is just over 3in tall (8.4cm) it has a hole in its head
      and
      > also a groove running down the lower part of the torso going into a
      > small cavity in the base.
      >
      > Cheers
      > Craig
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > SPONSORED LINKS
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    • Craig Lewis
      Thanks Rand, I think that the use I m thinking of is correct but the attribution is proving a bit tricky. D.R.C seems to be consistent with others opinions but
      Message 2 of 10 , Aug 10, 2005
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        Thanks Rand,
        I think that the use I'm thinking of is correct but the attribution
        is proving a bit tricky. D.R.C seems to be consistent with others
        opinions but nothing more specific so far.
        Cheers
        Craig



        --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, Rand African Art <rand@r...>
        wrote:
        > Hi Craig,
        > Your figure doesn't ring a bell with me, but I will keep my eyes
        peeled as I look through books in the near future to see if I can
        find anything similar. The size of the figure helps, at only around
        3" it does meet the criteria for the figures used in some divination
        practices like you mentioned.
        > Cheers!
        > RAND
        > Craig Lewis <craig_n_emma@y...> wrote:
        > Jean Pierre,
        > thanks for your suggestion. I was thinking something like Songye or
        > Hemba but Lwalwa is something I hadn't thought of.
        > I have tried looking for some Lwalwa figures but have only seen a 7
        > 1/2 inch(twice the size of mine) friction oracle kind of figure. Do
        > you think mine could be the same kind of thing?
        > If you have anything else you can add to your attribution or
        examples
        > of anythig similar I would be very happy to hear from you.
        > Thanks again,
        > Craig
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, Bouillie Jean-Pierre
        > <bouiliejp@y...> wrote:
        > > Craig,
        > > May-be Lwalwa.It's a magic one.
        > > Best
        > > Jean-Pierre
        > >
        > >
        > > Craig Lewis <craig_n_emma@y...> a écrit :
        > > Hi Group,
        > > any comments or input about a figure I have posted in the photo
        > section
        > > (craig) would be greatly appreciated.
        > >
        > >
        >
        http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group/african_arts/lst?.dir=/craig&.src
        > =gr&.order=&.view=t&.done=http%3a//briefcase.yahoo.com/
        > >
        > > The figure is just over 3in tall (8.4cm) it has a hole in its
        head
        > and
        > > also a groove running down the lower part of the torso going into
        a
        > > small cavity in the base.
        > >
        > > Cheers
        > > Craig
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > SPONSORED LINKS
        > > Art culture Fine art Fine art poster Fine art reproductions
        > Organizational culture
        > >
        > > ---------------------------------
        > > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
        > >
        > >
        > > Visit your group "African_Arts" on the web.
        > >
        > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > > African_Arts-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        > >
        > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
        > Service.
        > >
        > >
        > > ---------------------------------
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ---------------------------------
        > > Appel audio GRATUIT partout dans le monde avec le nouveau Yahoo!
        > Messenger
        > > Téléchargez le ici !
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > SPONSORED LINKS
        > Art culture Fine art Fine art poster Fine art reproductions
        Organizational culture
        >
        > ---------------------------------
        > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
        >
        >
        > Visit your group "African_Arts" on the web.
        >
        > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > African_Arts-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
        Service.
        >
        >
        > ---------------------------------
      • LRubinstein@post.harvard.edu
        Craig: Answers, perhaps not. But ideas, these I have... The most impressive elements of the little figure you have presented are the extreme abstraction of
        Message 3 of 10 , Aug 11, 2005
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          Craig:
           
          Answers, perhaps not.  But ideas, these I have...
           
          The most impressive elements of the little figure you have presented are the extreme abstraction of the face with the eyes being particularly prominent.  The hard geometry of the side view made me think particularly of Dogon figures from the Central Southern Face around Ogol, although I am not suggesting origin just noting an impression.  Generally, the extreme geometric abstraction makes me think more about Songye facial forms, especially those seen on Kifwebe masks.  Here is an example of a figure with such a pronouncedly abstracted facial structure and prominent eyes that I have come across:
           
          http://www.bs-kunsthandel.de/ausstellungen/0103/html/008.html Songye
          Fetischfigur
           Fetischfigur

          Songe, Demokr. Rep. Kongo
          Holz
          Länge 22 cm
            
            
           On the other hand, I was intrigued to find this image below of a Hemba figure, which -- while the body seems consistent with many Hemba figures -- exhibits an angularity and elongation that I do not generally associate with Hemba figures, although I do think of the Luba-Hemba complex when thinking of very small carved figures for inclusion in magical objects such as
           
           
           


           
          Of interest for both stylistics and abbreviation of form may be this Kasongo Kakudji  and Songye Nkisi from the Tomkins Collection (http://www.tomkinscollection.org/static/Africa.html ):
           
           
          Kasongo; Figure, kakudji; TC 132
          Kasongo
          Figure, kakudji
          Kasongo
          Wood, cloth, metal
          H. 20 cm
          TC 132

          Healing figure with magical substances embedded in the top of its head.

          Provenance:
          Donald Morris Gallery, New York, 2001
          Private collection, Michigan
          Marc Felix, Brussels

          _______________________________
          Songye; Figure, nkisi; TC 244 
          Finally, worth noting are the kakudji figures of the Luba which are used for magical purposes.  According to Mary N. and Allen F. Roberts in Memory:  Luba Art and the Making of History -- where a number of truncated "amulets" are illustrated --"These half figures...signal the importance of the head and torso as loci of personal strength and action."  (p.202)  Among the relevant illustrations are Cat. #85, a "house fetish" and Cat. #87 -- a group of four such half-figures (p.203).  According to the text on page 203, "Luba and Luba-related peoples wear and display small sculpted amulets for strength, for luck in hunting, and to remedy illness.  Sometimes they are hidden within the raffia of dance masks, and they frequently constitute part of a spirit medium's divining kit." 
          Finally, partial figures are also observable as part of a larger construction such as the Kabwelulu Gourd Figure ( a rattle, I believe) which is used in Bugabo Society rites.
           
          For now...Lee
        • Rand African Art
          Craig, While browsing the Internet this morning, looking for something or another, I came across the behind the scenes index pf pictures page for Dimondstein
          Message 4 of 10 , Aug 11, 2005
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            Craig,
            While browsing the Internet this morning, looking for something or another, I came across the behind the scenes index pf pictures page for Dimondstein Tribal Arts.
            http://www.dimondstein.com/pics/
             
            I clicked on the first couple of images to see them and the 2nd image on the page is something that looked very similar to your piece, at least structurally in my opinion.
             
            I then went to the site but couldn't find it in their list of objects. I would imagine that it was something they once had and it is still in their site's files foler.
             
            The piece they had/have looks very Hemba/Luba to me so it could fall in line with what Lee stated below from the - Luba Art and the Making of History - book.
             
            I know that doesn't really help much, it was just a "similar" figure to yours. You might email the gallery and see what they know?
             
            RAND
            p.s. they also had a pretty nice Pende mask :-)

            LRubinstein@... wrote:
            Craig:
             
            Answers, perhaps not.  But ideas, these I have...
             
            The most impressive elements of the little figure you have presented are the extreme abstraction of the face with the eyes being particularly prominent.  The hard geometry of the side view made me think particularly of Dogon figures from the Central Southern Face around Ogol, although I am not suggesting origin just noting an impression.  Generally, the extreme geometric abstraction makes me think more about Songye facial forms, especially those seen on Kifwebe masks.  Here is an example of a figure with such a pronouncedly abstracted facial structure and prominent eyes that I have come across:
             
            http://www.bs-kunsthandel.de/ausstellungen/0103/html/008.html Songye
            Fetischfigur
             Fetischfigur

            Songe, Demokr. Rep. Kongo
            Holz
            Länge 22 cm
              
              
             On the other hand, I was intrigued to find this image below of a Hemba figure, which -- while the body seems consistent with many Hemba figures -- exhibits an angularity and elongation that I do not generally associate with Hemba figures, although I do think of the Luba-Hemba complex when thinking of very small carved figures for inclusion in magical objects such as
             
             
             


             
            Of interest for both stylistics and abbreviation of form may be this Kasongo Kakudji  and Songye Nkisi from the Tomkins Collection (http://www.tomkinscollection.org/static/Africa.html ):
             
             
            Kasongo; Figure, kakudji; TC 132
            Kasongo
            Figure, kakudji
            Kasongo
            Wood, cloth, metal
            H. 20 cm
            TC 132

            Healing figure with magical substances embedded in the top of its head.

            Provenance:
            Donald Morris Gallery, New York, 2001
            Private collection, Michigan
            Marc Felix, Brussels

            _______________________________
            Songye; Figure, nkisi; TC 244 
            Finally, worth noting are the kakudji figures of the Luba which are used for magical purposes.  According to Mary N. and Allen F. Roberts in Memory:  Luba Art and the Making of History -- where a number of truncated "amulets" are illustrated --"These half figures...signal the importance of the head and torso as loci of personal strength and action."  (p.202)  Among the relevant illustrations are Cat. #85, a "house fetish" and Cat. #87 -- a group of four such half-figures (p.203).  According to the text on page 203, "Luba and Luba-related peoples wear and display small sculpted amulets for strength, for luck in hunting, and to remedy illness.  Sometimes they are hidden within the raffia of dance masks, and they frequently constitute part of a spirit medium's divining kit." 
            Finally, partial figures are also observable as part of a larger construction such as the Kabwelulu Gourd Figure ( a rattle, I believe) which is used in Bugabo Society rites.
             
            For now...Lee
          • Craig Lewis
            Lee and Rand, Wow!! Great work, thanks to you both. What I have found particularly interesting is the Kasongo figure that Lee found. The style of the head is
            Message 5 of 10 , Aug 11, 2005
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              Lee and Rand,
              Wow!! Great work, thanks to you both.
              What I have found particularly interesting is the Kasongo figure that
              Lee found. The style of the head is so similar (also with a hole for
              magical substances)
              . Someone suggested my figure could be from an area where styles and
              influences crossover. I am beginning to see that possibilty more and
              more.
              I can see why there have been comparisons to Hemba,Songye and now of
              course Kasongo.
              I found something in the Maurer collection which has a similar body
              style but the head is not at all similar.

              http://www.amherst.edu/~afroart/images/object146/image146b.jpg

              Thanks again for your work and ideas, it's not a "top end" piece by
              any means but I really like it and the more I'm finding out about it
              the more fascinating it is becoming and the more I am enjoying it.

              Cheers
              Craig




              --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, LRubinstein@p... wrote:
              >
              > Craig:
              >
              > Answers, perhaps not. But ideas, these I have...
              >
              > The most impressive elements of the little figure you have
              presented are the
              > extreme abstraction of the face with the eyes being particularly
              prominent.
              > The hard geometry of the side view made me think particularly of
              Dogon
              > figures from the Central Southern Face around Ogol, although I am
              not suggesting
              > origin just noting an impression. Generally, the extreme
              geometric
              > abstraction makes me think more about Songye facial forms,
              especially those seen on
              > Kifwebe masks. Here is an example of a figure with such a
              pronouncedly
              > abstracted facial structure and prominent eyes that I have come
              across:
              >
              > _http://www.bs-kunsthandel.de/ausstellungen/0103/html/008.html_
              > (http://www.bs-kunsthandel.de/ausstellungen/0103/html/008.html)
              Songye
              > Fetischfigur
              >
              > Songe, Demokr. Rep. Kongo
              > Holz
              > Länge 22 cm
              >
              >
              >
              > On the other hand, I was intrigued to find this image below of a
              Hemba
              > figure, which -- while the body seems consistent with many Hemba
              figures --
              > exhibits an angularity and elongation that I do not generally
              associate with Hemba
              > figures, although I do think of the Luba-Hemba complex when
              thinking of very
              > small carved figures for inclusion in magical objects such as
              >
              >
              > _http://web.onetel.net.uk/~herbertroese/Hembaman1.htm_
              > (http://web.onetel.net.uk/~herbertroese/Hembaman1.htm)
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Of interest for both stylistics and abbreviation of form may be
              this Kasongo
              > Kakudji and Songye Nkisi from the Tomkins Collection
              > (_http://www.tomkinscollection.org/static/Africa.html_
              > (http://www.tomkinscollection.org/static/Africa.html) ):
              >
              > _http://www.tomkinscollection.org/static/object_132.html_
              > (http://www.tomkinscollection.org/static/object_132.html)
              >
              > (http://www.tomkinscollection.org/static/Oceania.html)
              >
              > Kasongo
              > Figure, kakudji
              > Kasongo
              > Wood, cloth, metal
              > H. 20 cm
              > TC 132
              > Healing figure with magical substances embedded in the top of its
              head.
              > Provenance:
              > Donald Morris Gallery, New York, 2001
              > Private collection, Michigan
              > Marc Felix, Brussels
              > _______________________________
              >
              >
              >
              > Finally, worth noting are the kakudji figures of the Luba which
              are used for
              > magical purposes. According to Mary N. and Allen F. Roberts in
              Memory:
              > Luba Art and the Making of History -- where a number of
              truncated "amulets" are
              > illustrated --"These half figures...signal the importance of the
              head and
              > torso as loci of personal strength and action." (p.202) Among
              the relevant
              > illustrations are Cat. #85, a "house fetish" and Cat. #87 -- a
              group of four
              > such half-figures (p.203). According to the text on page
              203, "Luba and
              > Luba-related peoples wear and display small sculpted amulets for
              strength, for luck
              > in hunting, and to remedy illness. Sometimes they are hidden
              within the
              > raffia of dance masks, and they frequently constitute part of a
              spirit medium's
              > divining kit."
              > Finally, partial figures are also observable as part of a larger
              > construction such as the Kabwelulu Gourd Figure ( a rattle, I
              believe) which is used in
              > Bugabo Society rites.
              >
              > For now...Lee
            • John Nash
              Dear Group, I am traveling to Ghana next week with hopes of meeting artists who are doing interesting work to showcase on a web site I run called
              Message 6 of 10 , Aug 13, 2005
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                Dear Group,
                 
                I am traveling to Ghana next week with hopes of meeting artists who are doing interesting work to showcase on a web site I run called AfricanCraft.com. The web site offers a free service to African artists and artisans to promote their work. I am wondering if anyone has any names they would like to recommend? (I would need some contact info, or directions for finding the artist).
                 
                I am particularly interested in meeting artisans whose patrons include the local population, but am also open to any artist whose work you would like to recommend.
                 
                Thanks in advance for any suggestions. please feel free to email me privately if you prefer.
                 
                John
                 
                 
                 
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