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Re: [African_Arts] Re:Chi Wara

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  • Rand African Art
    I love the chi wara in your living room, seeing in in your logo is so much different than being right up next to it in the room, it has such a great presence
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 8, 2005
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      I love the chi wara in your living room, seeing in in your logo is so much different than being right up next to it in the room, it has such a great presence about it!
       
      Regarding telling if the horizontal Chi Waras are male or female, I have seen in publications some with female figures tied to the horns that I believe have been identified as "female". I have also read somewhere that the horizontal examples with the figures sticking out of the front are considered males. I can't remember the reference source at the moment.
       
      They are usually lacking any identification one way or the other and are not as easy to tell as the vertical styles as you say. I did have one in my collection that was clearly a female, but most examples I have seen are lacking anything to identify them one way or another.
      I am not 100% sure that the horizontal versions are danced in pairs like the vertical examples were, so there may not have been a need to differentiate the sexes or there may have been slightly different meanings behind them.
      If you go to the Sotheby's Sold Lot Archive, type in Bamana in the KEYWORD section and then click GO on the bottom, it will pull up many different examples, including a horizontal example with a small abstract example tied to the horns (page 6).
       
       
      RAND

      eliza500@... wrote:
      What a lovely piece.I really love the chi wara/tji wara/ ci wara.  One of my favorite pieces is the large "father chi wara" which  is in our living room, and we use as our company logo.  There seems to be great variety in the "base animals," bneath the horizontal or vertical horned "antelope"--all of indeterminate species, and most clearly boys.  The vertical ones are easy to determine male/female becuase of the presence of the babies with the females, but I have not seen a differentiation between male and female horizontal chi wara.
      Best,
      Elizabeth Bennett

      Africa Direct
    • Rand African Art
      Hi group, I was searching through my African Arts publications tonight and I ran across the photos and references citing the male and female horizontal
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 11, 2005
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        Hi group,
        I was searching through my African Arts publications tonight and I ran across the photos and references citing the "male and female" horizontal Ciwara/Tji wara.
         
        There are a couple of fantastic articles in the Summer 2000 African Arts publication that are devoted to the "Ciwara" -
        Antelope Headdresses and Champion Farmers - Negotiating Meaning and Identity Through the Bamana Ciwara Complex
        and
        The Two Worlds of Ciwara
         
        I mentioned that I had seen/read that sometimes the horizontal versions sexes were identified by figures attached to the horns and below is the example:
         
        The male and female ciwarakunwon view after the performance. Village of Falayorola, October 1993. Photo: Stephen Woolen. The sculptures, freshly oiled or blackened, are composed of three parts: the body, the head, and the surmounting figurine—a female image on the female ciwarakun, a male figure carrying a gun on the male headdress.

        Also, I found reference to the examples with the heads protruding from the front:

        http://www.randafricanart.com/sitebuilder/images/ciwara_horizontal_stanley_coll-600x426.jpg

        Horizontal ciwara crest. Bamana peoples. Mali. Wood, iron, cloth; height 54.6cm (21.5"). Collection of the Stanley Family, Muscatine, Iowa. The lower portion of this crest depicts an aardvark with its tail curled contrary to nature. The head may refer to several animals at once, with the long ears of an aardvark combined with what may be a goat's head.

        http://www.randafricanart.com/sitebuilder/images/ciwara_illustration2-951x547.jpg

        Cheers!

        RAND




        Rand African Art <rand@...> wrote:
        I love the chi wara in your living room, seeing in in your logo is so much different than being right up next to it in the room, it has such a great presence about it!
         
        Regarding telling if the horizontal Chi Waras are male or female, I have seen in publications some with female figures tied to the horns that I believe have been identified as "female". I have also read somewhere that the horizontal examples with the figures sticking out of the front are considered males. I can't remember the reference source at the moment.
         
        They are usually lacking any identification one way or the other and are not as easy to tell as the vertical styles as you say. I did have one in my collection that was clearly a female, but most examples I have seen are lacking anything to identify them one way or another.
        I am not 100% sure that the horizontal versions are danced in pairs like the vertical examples were, so there may not have been a need to differentiate the sexes or there may have been slightly different meanings behind them.
        If you go to the Sotheby's Sold Lot Archive, type in Bamana in the KEYWORD section and then click GO on the bottom, it will pull up many different examples, including a horizontal example with a small abstract example tied to the horns (page 6).
         
         
        RAND

        eliza500@... wrote:
        What a lovely piece.I really love the chi wara/tji wara/ ci wara.  One of my favorite pieces is the large "father chi wara" which  is in our living room, and we use as our company logo.  There seems to be great variety in the "base animals," bneath the horizontal or vertical horned "antelope"--all of indeterminate species, and most clearly boys.  The vertical ones are easy to determine male/female becuase of the presence of the babies with the females, but I have not seen a differentiation between male and female horizontal chi wara.
        Best,
        Elizabeth Bennett

        Africa Direct
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