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Re: [African_Arts] Re: wood worms

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  • Ed Jones
    Armin:   As you have just declared, it is a matter of newer  wood... predicated on IF and other specific conditions.  New wood is typically wet, softer
    Message 1 of 14 , Mar 1, 2009
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      Armin:
       
      As you have just declared, it is a matter of "newer" wood... predicated on "IF" and other specific conditions.  New wood is typically wet, softer and provides easier digestion.  Humidity creates conditions which attract such pests.  For example, like leaving food out in the kitchen for a prolonged period of time... expect roaches, rats and maybe some "fastidious" human types to enjoy the feast as well.
       
      Additionally, my comment is general and not categorically "specific" and I was not addressing my collection.  However, thanks for sharing your observations and thoughts.
       
      It's relative.  I elect not to get into the accepted behaviors of "museums", which is interesting enough.  
       
      Ed

       


      From: toguna2002 <toguna2002@...>
      To: African_Arts@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Saturday, February 28, 2009 2:40:45 PM
      Subject: [African_Arts] Re: wood worms


      Hello Ed,
      What kind of "Gourmet wood worms" do you have in your collection that
      they eat only fresh wood? I think your wood worms are ill-bred and too
      fastidious.
      It`s not a question of new or old wood. If old wood becomes wet
      because of environment humidity (storage in humid cellar etc. ) it
      becomes a delicacy for wood worms. It`s not the age of the wood.
      Accompanied by the right "dressing" the wood worm likes every age of
      wood. If you want to fool your wood worm to eat your old masks and
      statues instead your new ones - simply store your objects for several
      months in a humid cellar. Your wood worm will thank it with a "Bon
      Appetit"
      here you can learn how to feed your worms
      http://www.nature. nps.gov/biology/ ipm/manual/ museum.cfm
      I ask myself :Why museums should be afraid for their old collections,
      if wood worms are not interested in old wood?
      Sincerely
      Armin

      --- In African_Arts@ yahoogroups. com, Ed Jones <bucit@...> wrote:
      > There are several historical posts and comments with the group on
      this subject. Fresh saw-dust is a certain sign of "new" wood (not dried and aged). It is not difficult to combat or over-come. A deep freeze noramlly
      does the trick.
      Ed


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