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Horse and Rider statue

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  • tribeshome
    Hello Group, I need your help once again in identifying this horse and rider that recently was consigned to me.
    Message 1 of 7 , Sep 11, 2008
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      Hello Group,

      I need your help once again in identifying this horse and rider that recently was consigned to
      me.

      http://ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/African_Arts/photos/browse/131d?m=l

      Thanks for your expert assistance.

      Jan
    • Lee Rubinstein
      Jan: Although there are considerable variations from the style I perceive as an influence or inspiration for the equestrian figure you present, I would guess
      Message 2 of 7 , Sep 11, 2008
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        Jan:

        Although there are considerable variations from the style I perceive as an influence or inspiration for the equestrian figure you present, I would guess that this is a fairly recent work (with an overly heavy simulated patina) which is loosely based on Bamana stylistics found among a group of works from the Segou region of southeastern Mali.  There are a number of instances of the Segou style to which I refer, a figural style of which one consistent characteristic seem to be the presence of large, flat, forward-facing, almost paddle-like hands.  These Segou-style figures portray various postures and are scattered among major museums including the University Museum, the NMAfA (Cat. No. 82-5-1);  Musée du Quai Branly (71.1933.57.3 -- "Stauette de cavalier, Kassonké" -- thumbnail below***); and the University of Iowa Art Museum (Stanley Collection Catalogue # 575).  I should note, however, that -- while I perceive some influence -- all of the figures to which I refer have are longer and more elegant with very finely carved decorative detail and more pronounced facial elements including a distinctively rounded, accentuated nose and rounded eyes which do not appear on your figure.  

        Lee

        *** Cliquez sur l'image pour la visualiser en plein écran
        On Sep 11, 2008, at 6:06 PM, tribeshome wrote:

        Hello Group,

        I need your help once again in identifying this horse and rider that recently was consigned to 
        me. 

        http://ph.groups. yahoo.com/ group/African_ Arts/photos/ browse/131d? m=l

        Thanks for your expert assistance.

        Jan


      • Veronique Martelliere
        Bonjour ! I seize this opportunity to show you an equestrian figure that i bought in Singapore (from another french expat ) who told me that it was Marka, a
        Message 3 of 7 , Sep 12, 2008
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          Bonjour !
          I seize this opportunity to show you an equestrian figure approx. 64 cm (25 in.) high that i bought in Singapore (from another french expat') who told me that it was Marka, a Bamana sub-tribe - and the style seems to correspond, indeed, to what i have seen of Marka style.
          Could this figure be "real" or is this a "riding fata morgana" ?  
          Thank You for your attention !
          ... and have a nice day.
          Véro

           

          ----- Original Message ----
          From: Lee Rubinstein <LeeRubinstein@...>
          To: African_Arts@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Friday, September 12, 2008 1:53:09 AM
          Subject: Re: [African_Arts] Horse and Rider statue

          Jan:


          Although there are considerable variations from the style I perceive as an influence or inspiration for the equestrian figure you present, I would guess that this is a fairly recent work (with an overly heavy simulated patina) which is loosely based on Bamana stylistics found among a group of works from the Segou region of southeastern Mali.  There are a number of instances of the Segou style to which I refer, a figural style of which one consistent characteristic seem to be the presence of large, flat, forward-facing, almost paddle-like hands.  These Segou-style figures portray various postures and are scattered among major museums including the University Museum, the NMAfA (Cat. No. 82-5-1);  Musée du Quai Branly (71.1933.57. 3 -- "Stauette de cavalier, Kassonké" -- thumbnail below***); and the University of Iowa Art Museum (Stanley Collection Catalogue # 575).  I should note, however, that -- while I perceive some influence -- all of the figures to which I refer have are longer and more elegant with very finely carved decorative detail and more pronounced facial elements including a distinctively rounded, accentuated nose and rounded eyes which do not appear on your figure.  

          Lee

          *** Cliquez sur l'image pour la visualiser en plein écran
          On Sep 11, 2008, at 6:06 PM, tribeshome wrote:

          Hello Group,

          I need your help once again in identifying this horse and rider that recently was consigned to 
          me. 

          http://ph.groups. yahoo.com/ group/African_ Arts/photos/ browse/131d? m=l

          Thanks for your expert assistance.

          Jan



        • Lee Rubinstein
          Bonjour, Véro! Briefly, as I must get on my horse and gallop...the equestrian figure you present displays more of the characteristics associated with the
          Message 4 of 7 , Sep 12, 2008
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            Bonjour, Véro!

            Briefly, as I must get on my horse and gallop...the equestrian figure you present displays more of the characteristics associated with the carvings from the area of Segou as well as having the freely carved legs which we see in the QB example (as opposed to the platform base seen, for example, in Jan's figure).  

            Given the long history of commercial, social and cultural interaction and the presence of varied groups and sub-groups -- such as the Marka -- in the area of Segou and the proximity of Markala to Segou (both carving locales), it is indeed possible that styles have been shared and modified.  Also, it would be difficult to overlook the likely stylistic inter-influence from the broader region through which trade and migration routes have traveled which can be perceived in the stylized nose -- not unlike and likely related to that observed in Guinean figures, most notably that of the D'mba, or Nimba, forms of the Baga.  Clearly, further investigation of the relationships among groups in the region would be required to hypothesize about the origins and influences of specific stylistic elements...

            Among works which might help shed light on this question are Patrick R. McNaughton's The Mande Blacksmiths:  Knowledge, Power and Art in West Africa (Bloomington and Indianapolis:  Indiana University Press 1993 [1988]).  There are also general works on the Bamana (or Bambara) by Goldwater (1960) and Colleyn.   The earliest cited consideration I can find specifically regarding this stylistic corpus is Alllen Wardwell's "Some Notes on a Substyle of the Bambara,"  Museum Studies (The Art Institute of Chicago) 1966, 1:112-28.  

            Lee

            On Sep 12, 2008, at 5:32 AM, Veronique Martelliere wrote:


            Bonjour !
            I seize this opportunity to show you an equestrian figure approx. 64 cm (25 in.) high that i bought in Singapore (from another french expat') who told me that it was Marka, a Bamana sub-tribe - and the style seems to correspond, indeed, to what i have seen of Marka style.
            Could this figure be "real" or is this a "riding fata morgana" ?  
            Thank You for your attention !
            ... and have a nice day.
            Véro

             

            ----- Original Message ----
            From: Lee Rubinstein <LeeRubinstein@ mac.com>
            To: African_Arts@ yahoogroups. com
            Sent: Friday, September 12, 2008 1:53:09 AM
            Subject: Re: [African_Arts] Horse and Rider statue

            Jan:


            Although there are considerable variations from the style I perceive as an influence or inspiration for the equestrian figure you present, I would guess that this is a fairly recent work (with an overly heavy simulated patina) which is loosely based on Bamana stylistics found among a group of works from the Segou region of southeastern Mali.  There are a number of instances of the Segou style to which I refer, a figural style of which one consistent characteristic seem to be the presence of large, flat, forward-facing, almost paddle-like hands.  These Segou-style figures portray various postures and are scattered among major museums including the University Museum, the NMAfA (Cat. No. 82-5-1);  Musée du Quai Branly (71.1933.57. 3 -- "Stauette de cavalier, Kassonké" -- thumbnail below***); and the University of Iowa Art Museum (Stanley Collection Catalogue # 575).  I should note, however, that -- while I perceive some influence -- all of the figures to which I refer have are longer and more elegant with very finely carved decorative detail and more pronounced facial elements including a distinctively rounded, accentuated nose and rounded eyes which do not appear on your figure.  

            Lee

            *** Cliquez sur l'image pour la visualiser en plein écran
            On Sep 11, 2008, at 6:06 PM, tribeshome wrote:

            Hello Group,

            I need your help once again in identifying this horse and rider that recently was consigned to 
            me. 

            http://ph.groups. yahoo.com/ group/African_ Arts/photos/ browse/131d? m=l

            Thanks for your expert assistance.

            Jan




            <BAMANA-MARKA - Fig equestre  c.jpg><BAMANA-MARKA - Fig equestre b.jpg>

          • Veronique Martelliere
            Bonjour, Lee ! The best value i see in African arts is in the knowledge and understanding of it. If there was a Wall Street for that, i would definitely invest
            Message 5 of 7 , Sep 15, 2008
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              Bonjour, Lee !

              The best value i see in African arts is in the knowledge and understanding of it. If there was a Wall Street for that, i would definitely invest in you at the first place. You are an invaluable source of information - and, i'm sure, an invaluable person, too.

              Thanks a lot Lee, for your answer to my question and for all your answers to all questions !

              Amitiés

              Véro



              ----- Original Message ----
              From: Lee Rubinstein <LeeRubinstein@...>
              To: African_Arts@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Friday, September 12, 2008 3:27:55 PM
              Subject: Re: [African_Arts] Horse and Rider statue

              Bonjour, Véro!


              Briefly, as I must get on my horse and gallop...the equestrian figure you present displays more of the characteristics associated with the carvings from the area of Segou as well as having the freely carved legs which we see in the QB example (as opposed to the platform base seen, for example, in Jan's figure).  

              Given the long history of commercial, social and cultural interaction and the presence of varied groups and sub-groups -- such as the Marka -- in the area of Segou and the proximity of Markala to Segou (both carving locales), it is indeed possible that styles have been shared and modified.  Also, it would be difficult to overlook the likely stylistic inter-influence from the broader region through which trade and migration routes have traveled which can be perceived in the stylized nose -- not unlike and likely related to that observed in Guinean figures, most notably that of the D'mba, or Nimba, forms of the Baga.  Clearly, further investigation of the relationships among groups in the region would be required to hypothesize about the origins and influences of specific stylistic elements...

              Among works which might help shed light on this question are Patrick R. McNaughton's The Mande Blacksmiths:  Knowledge, Power and Art in West Africa (Bloomington and Indianapolis:  Indiana University Press 1993 [1988]).  There are also general works on the Bamana (or Bambara) by Goldwater (1960) and Colleyn.   The earliest cited consideration I can find specifically regarding this stylistic corpus is Alllen Wardwell's "Some Notes on a Substyle of the Bambara,"  Museum Studies (The Art Institute of Chicago) 1966, 1:112-28.  

              Lee

              On Sep 12, 2008, at 5:32 AM, Veronique Martelliere wrote:


              Bonjour !
              I seize this opportunity to show you an equestrian figure approx. 64 cm (25 in.) high that i bought in Singapore (from another french expat') who told me that it was Marka, a Bamana sub-tribe - and the style seems to correspond, indeed, to what i have seen of Marka style.
              Could this figure be "real" or is this a "riding fata morgana" ?  
              Thank You for your attention !
              ... and have a nice day.
              Véro

               

              ----- Original Message ----
              From: Lee Rubinstein <LeeRubinstein@ mac.com>
              To: African_Arts@ yahoogroups. com
              Sent: Friday, September 12, 2008 1:53:09 AM
              Subject: Re: [African_Arts] Horse and Rider statue

              Jan:


              Although there are considerable variations from the style I perceive as an influence or inspiration for the equestrian figure you present, I would guess that this is a fairly recent work (with an overly heavy simulated patina) which is loosely based on Bamana stylistics found among a group of works from the Segou region of southeastern Mali.  There are a number of instances of the Segou style to which I refer, a figural style of which one consistent characteristic seem to be the presence of large, flat, forward-facing, almost paddle-like hands.  These Segou-style figures portray various postures and are scattered among major museums including the University Museum, the NMAfA (Cat. No. 82-5-1);  Musée du Quai Branly (71.1933.57. 3 -- "Stauette de cavalier, Kassonké" -- thumbnail below***); and the University of Iowa Art Museum (Stanley Collection Catalogue # 575).  I should note, however, that -- while I perceive some influence -- all of the figures to which I refer have are longer and more elegant with very finely carved decorative detail and more pronounced facial elements including a distinctively rounded, accentuated nose and rounded eyes which do not appear on your figure.  

              Lee

              *** Cliquez sur l'image pour la visualiser en plein écran
              On Sep 11, 2008, at 6:06 PM, tribeshome wrote:

              Hello Group,

              I need your help once again in identifying this horse and rider that recently was consigned to 
              me. 

              http://ph.groups. yahoo.com/ group/African_ Arts/photos/ browse/131d? m=l

              Thanks for your expert assistance.

              Jan




              <BAMANA-MARKA - Fig equestre  c.jpg><BAMANA-MARKA - Fig equestre b.jpg>


            • Lee Rubinstein
              Merci, Véro. While I am most appreciative of your kind words, I am as much happy to have an opportunity to continue the conversation regarding the question of
              Message 6 of 7 , Sep 15, 2008
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                Merci, Véro.

                While I am most appreciative of your kind words, I am as much happy to have an opportunity to continue the conversation regarding the question of the equestrian figures and to provide additional resources which point to those with a greater depth of specialized knowledge as well as indicating further directions for exploration regarding the topic at hand.  

                Perhaps more so than the knowledge which one can bring to objects investigated one can rather accumulate and prioritize questions which need to be asked in order to begin to answer the initial inquiry.  I am always wary of identifications and authentications which are overly simple, as I believe most questions in this realm are best answered with further questions which help to illuminate the field in which any particular object may stand.  Once these questions are formulated, one can construct a listing of relevant resources which illuminate the histories, symbolism, etc.,  which may help to round out the perception and understanding of the object under consideration and its past environments.  Horse and equestrian figures in African art, generally, are most intriguing as they lead to an awareness of the very complex ways in which the presence -- or absence -- of horses and their uses and perceptions in various African environments and historical contexts (including scenarios of culture contact and domination) influence how the horse as image may signify both historical and symbolic meanings in diverse contexts.  Among the additional resources to which I would point individuals with a specific interest in developing an understanding of the role of the horse both as historical and symbolic presence in African art, history and culture are these: 

                Herbert M. Cole's "Riders of Power:  The Mounted Leader" in ICONS:  Ideals and Power in the Art of Africa (Washington, DC and London:  NMAfA/Smithsonian Institution Press 1989), pp. 116-135.

                Pezzoli, Gigi (editor), Cavalieri dell’Africa: Storia, iconografia, simbolismo Cavaliers d’Afrique: Histoire, iconographie, symbolisme / Horsemen of Africa: History, Iconography, Symbolism, Milan: Centro Studi Archeologia Africana, 1995  (See link for a full listing of articles in Italian, English and French:  http://www.chipublib.org/search/details/cn/1365073/results/1/?branch=127) including these articles which offer specific fields of insight relevant to the current discussion:

                "Role historique et fonction symbolique du cheval chez les Sonninké du Wagadu et les Dogon" by Germaine Dieterlen

                "Le cheval en Afrique d'apres les collections du Musée de l'Homme"  by Josette Rivallain

                The journey toward knowledge and understanding of any work is rarely finite and perhaps best undertaken on foot -- or at a canter rather than a gallop -- so as to allow a full opportunity to explore the terrain en route to one's destination, or one's (interim) conclusion of the inquiry.  Then, however, there is always another object/question on the horizon and another journey or uncertainty to contemplate which will likely present new information prompting la look over one's shoulder to wonder what unturned stone on the previous route might have yielded a richer, or different, insight.

                Lee

                On Sep 15, 2008, at 7:34 AM, Veronique Martelliere wrote:


                Bonjour, Lee !

                The best value i see in African arts is in the knowledge and understanding of it. If there was a Wall Street for that, i would definitely invest in you at the first place. You are an invaluable source of information - and, i'm sure, an invaluable person, too.

                Thanks a lot Lee, for your answer to my question and for all your answers to all questions !

                Amitiés

                Véro



                ----- Original Message ----
                From: Lee Rubinstein <LeeRubinstein@ mac.com>
                To: African_Arts@ yahoogroups. com
                Sent: Friday, September 12, 2008 3:27:55 PM
                Subject: Re: [African_Arts] Horse and Rider statue

                Bonjour, Véro!


                Briefly, as I must get on my horse and gallop...the equestrian figure you present displays more of the characteristics associated with the carvings from the area of Segou as well as having the freely carved legs which we see in the QB example (as opposed to the platform base seen, for example, in Jan's figure).  

                Given the long history of commercial, social and cultural interaction and the presence of varied groups and sub-groups -- such as the Marka -- in the area of Segou and the proximity of Markala to Segou (both carving locales), it is indeed possible that styles have been shared and modified.  Also, it would be difficult to overlook the likely stylistic inter-influence from the broader region through which trade and migration routes have traveled which can be perceived in the stylized nose -- not unlike and likely related to that observed in Guinean figures, most notably that of the D'mba, or Nimba, forms of the Baga.  Clearly, further investigation of the relationships among groups in the region would be required to hypothesize about the origins and influences of specific stylistic elements...

                Among works which might help shed light on this question are Patrick R. McNaughton's The Mande Blacksmiths:  Knowledge, Power and Art in West Africa (Bloomington and Indianapolis:  Indiana University Press 1993 [1988]).  There are also general works on the Bamana (or Bambara) by Goldwater (1960) and Colleyn.   The earliest cited consideration I can find specifically regarding this stylistic corpus is Alllen Wardwell's "Some Notes on a Substyle of the Bambara,"  Museum Studies (The Art Institute of Chicago) 1966, 1:112-28.  

                Lee

                On Sep 12, 2008, at 5:32 AM, Veronique Martelliere wrote:


                Bonjour !
                I seize this opportunity to show you an equestrian figure approx. 64 cm (25 in.) high that i bought in Singapore (from another french expat') who told me that it was Marka, a Bamana sub-tribe - and the style seems to correspond, indeed, to what i have seen of Marka style.
                Could this figure be "real" or is this a "riding fata morgana" ?  
                Thank You for your attention !
                ... and have a nice day.
                Véro

                 

                ----- Original Message ----
                From: Lee Rubinstein <LeeRubinstein@ mac.com>
                To: African_Arts@ yahoogroups. com
                Sent: Friday, September 12, 2008 1:53:09 AM
                Subject: Re: [African_Arts] Horse and Rider statue

                Jan:


                Although there are considerable variations from the style I perceive as an influence or inspiration for the equestrian figure you present, I would guess that this is a fairly recent work (with an overly heavy simulated patina) which is loosely based on Bamana stylistics found among a group of works from the Segou region of southeastern Mali.  There are a number of instances of the Segou style to which I refer, a figural style of which one consistent characteristic seem to be the presence of large, flat, forward-facing, almost paddle-like hands.  These Segou-style figures portray various postures and are scattered among major museums including the University Museum, the NMAfA (Cat. No. 82-5-1);  Musée du Quai Branly (71.1933.57. 3 -- "Stauette de cavalier, Kassonké" -- thumbnail below***); and the University of Iowa Art Museum (Stanley Collection Catalogue # 575).  I should note, however, that -- while I perceive some influence -- all of the figures to which I refer have are longer and more elegant with very finely carved decorative detail and more pronounced facial elements including a distinctively rounded, accentuated nose and rounded eyes which do not appear on your figure.  

                Lee

                *** Cliquez sur l'image pour la visualiser en plein écran
                On Sep 11, 2008, at 6:06 PM, tribeshome wrote:

                Hello Group,

                I need your help once again in identifying this horse and rider that recently was consigned to 
                me. 

                http://ph.groups. yahoo.com/ group/African_ Arts/photos/ browse/131d? m=l

                Thanks for your expert assistance.

                Jan




                <BAMANA-MARKA - Fig equestre  c.jpg><BAMANA-MARKA - Fig equestre b.jpg>




              • Veronique Martelliere
                The journey toward knowledge and understanding of any work is rarely finite and perhaps best undertaken on foot -- or at a canter rather than a gallop -- so as
                Message 7 of 7 , Sep 16, 2008
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                  The journey toward knowledge and understanding of any work is rarely finite and perhaps best undertaken on foot -- or at a canter rather than a gallop -- so as to allow a full opportunity to explore the terrain en route to one's destination, or one's (interim) conclusion of the inquiry.  Then, however, there is always another object/question on the horizon and another journey or uncertainty to contemplate which will likely present new information prompting la look over one's shoulder to wonder what unturned stone on the previous route might have yielded a richer, or different, insight.

                  It's a very nice way to put it, Lee. It is exactly how i see things.
                  Sometimes i have the impression that some collectors forget to enjoy the journey.
                  Thus, at the Parcours des Mondes, i felt as a school-horse in a horserace among racehorses with much Eur-Eur and $-$ horsepower !
                   
                  Thank You for the recommendations of reading ! I'll follow them. In my speed.
                  Thanks for being here !
                  Vero
                   
                   
                   

                  ----- Original Message ----
                  From: Lee Rubinstein <LeeRubinstein@...>
                  To: African_Arts@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Monday, September 15, 2008 4:02:17 PM
                  Subject: Re: [African_Arts] Horse and Rider statue

                  Merci, Véro.

                  While I am most appreciative of your kind words, I am as much happy to have an opportunity to continue the conversation regarding the question of the equestrian figures and to provide additional resources which point to those with a greater depth of specialized knowledge as well as indicating further directions for exploration regarding the topic at hand.  

                  Perhaps more so than the knowledge which one can bring to objects investigated one can rather accumulate and prioritize questions which need to be asked in order to begin to answer the initial inquiry.  I am always wary of identifications and authentications which are overly simple, as I believe most questions in this realm are best answered with further questions which help to illuminate the field in which any particular object may stand.  Once these questions are formulated, one can construct a listing of relevant resources which illuminate the histories, symbolism, etc.,  which may help to round out the perception and understanding of the object under consideration and its past environments.  Horse and equestrian figures in African art, generally, are most intriguing as they lead to an awareness of the very complex ways in which the presence -- or absence -- of horses and their uses and perceptions in various African environments and historical contexts (including scenarios of culture contact and domination) influence how the horse as image may signify both historical and symbolic meanings in diverse contexts.  Among the additional resources to which I would point individuals with a specific interest in developing an understanding of the role of the horse both as historical and symbolic presence in African art, history and culture are these: 

                  Herbert M. Cole's "Riders of Power:  The Mounted Leader" in ICONS:  Ideals and Power in the Art of Africa (Washington, DC and London:  NMAfA/Smithsonian Institution Press 1989), pp. 116-135.

                  Pezzoli, Gigi (editor), Cavalieri dell’Africa: Storia, iconografia, simbolismo Cavaliers d’Afrique: Histoire, iconographie, symbolisme / Horsemen of Africa: History, Iconography, Symbolism, Milan: Centro Studi Archeologia Africana, 1995  (See link for a full listing of articles in Italian, English and French:  http://www.chipubli b.org/search/ details/cn/ 1365073/results/ 1/?branch= 127) including these articles which offer specific fields of insight relevant to the current discussion:

                  "Role historique et fonction symbolique du cheval chez les Sonninké du Wagadu et les Dogon" by Germaine Dieterlen

                  "Le cheval en Afrique d'apres les collections du Musée de l'Homme"  by Josette Rivallain

                  The journey toward knowledge and understanding of any work is rarely finite and perhaps best undertaken on foot -- or at a canter rather than a gallop -- so as to allow a full opportunity to explore the terrain en route to one's destination, or one's (interim) conclusion of the inquiry.  Then, however, there is always another object/question on the horizon and another journey or uncertainty to contemplate which will likely present new information prompting la look over one's shoulder to wonder what unturned stone on the previous route might have yielded a richer, or different, insight.

                  Lee

                  On Sep 15, 2008, at 7:34 AM, Veronique Martelliere wrote:


                  Bonjour, Lee !

                  The best value i see in African arts is in the knowledge and understanding of it. If there was a Wall Street for that, i would definitely invest in you at the first place. You are an invaluable source of information - and, i'm sure, an invaluable person, too.

                  Thanks a lot Lee, for your answer to my question and for all your answers to all questions !

                  Amitiés

                  Véro



                  ----- Original Message ----
                  From: Lee Rubinstein <LeeRubinstein@ mac.com>
                  To: African_Arts@ yahoogroups. com
                  Sent: Friday, September 12, 2008 3:27:55 PM
                  Subject: Re: [African_Arts] Horse and Rider statue

                  Bonjour, Véro!


                  Briefly, as I must get on my horse and gallop...the equestrian figure you present displays more of the characteristics associated with the carvings from the area of Segou as well as having the freely carved legs which we see in the QB example (as opposed to the platform base seen, for example, in Jan's figure).  

                  Given the long history of commercial, social and cultural interaction and the presence of varied groups and sub-groups -- such as the Marka -- in the area of Segou and the proximity of Markala to Segou (both carving locales), it is indeed possible that styles have been shared and modified.  Also, it would be difficult to overlook the likely stylistic inter-influence from the broader region through which trade and migration routes have traveled which can be perceived in the stylized nose -- not unlike and likely related to that observed in Guinean figures, most notably that of the D'mba, or Nimba, forms of the Baga.  Clearly, further investigation of the relationships among groups in the region would be required to hypothesize about the origins and influences of specific stylistic elements...

                  Among works which might help shed light on this question are Patrick R. McNaughton's The Mande Blacksmiths:  Knowledge, Power and Art in West Africa (Bloomington and Indianapolis:  Indiana University Press 1993 [1988]).  There are also general works on the Bamana (or Bambara) by Goldwater (1960) and Colleyn.   The earliest cited consideration I can find specifically regarding this stylistic corpus is Alllen Wardwell's "Some Notes on a Substyle of the Bambara,"  Museum Studies (The Art Institute of Chicago) 1966, 1:112-28.  

                  Lee

                  On Sep 12, 2008, at 5:32 AM, Veronique Martelliere wrote:


                  Bonjour !
                  I seize this opportunity to show you an equestrian figure approx. 64 cm (25 in.) high that i bought in Singapore (from another french expat') who told me that it was Marka, a Bamana sub-tribe - and the style seems to correspond, indeed, to what i have seen of Marka style.
                  Could this figure be "real" or is this a "riding fata morgana" ?  
                  Thank You for your attention !
                  ... and have a nice day.
                  Véro

                   

                  ----- Original Message ----
                  From: Lee Rubinstein <LeeRubinstein@ mac.com>
                  To: African_Arts@ yahoogroups. com
                  Sent: Friday, September 12, 2008 1:53:09 AM
                  Subject: Re: [African_Arts] Horse and Rider statue

                  Jan:


                  Although there are considerable variations from the style I perceive as an influence or inspiration for the equestrian figure you present, I would guess that this is a fairly recent work (with an overly heavy simulated patina) which is loosely based on Bamana stylistics found among a group of works from the Segou region of southeastern Mali.  There are a number of instances of the Segou style to which I refer, a figural style of which one consistent characteristic seem to be the presence of large, flat, forward-facing, almost paddle-like hands.  These Segou-style figures portray various postures and are scattered among major museums including the University Museum, the NMAfA (Cat. No. 82-5-1);  Musée du Quai Branly (71.1933.57. 3 -- "Stauette de cavalier, Kassonké" -- thumbnail below***); and the University of Iowa Art Museum (Stanley Collection Catalogue # 575).  I should note, however, that -- while I perceive some influence -- all of the figures to which I refer have are longer and more elegant with very finely carved decorative detail and more pronounced facial elements including a distinctively rounded, accentuated nose and rounded eyes which do not appear on your figure.  

                  Lee

                  *** Cliquez sur l'image pour la visualiser en plein écran
                  On Sep 11, 2008, at 6:06 PM, tribeshome wrote:

                  Hello Group,

                  I need your help once again in identifying this horse and rider that recently was consigned to 
                  me. 

                  http://ph.groups. yahoo.com/ group/African_ Arts/photos/ browse/131d? m=l

                  Thanks for your expert assistance.

                  Jan




                  <BAMANA-MARKA - Fig equestre  c.jpg><BAMANA-MARKA - Fig equestre b.jpg>





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