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Re: Unusual Bamana Mask -- Wokalo Kun

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  • DZ Levine
    Ed, tell me about the other masks danced with the Chiwarras, would you? Snuff: yes, it is a powdered green tobacco. I didn t try it. It is highly prized and
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 9, 2008
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      Ed, tell me about the other masks danced with the Chiwarras, would you?
      Snuff: yes, it is a powdered green tobacco. I didn't try it. It is highly prized and seems to be  used in place of kola in the village. In fact, I haven't seen kola used at all.
      The folks don't "snuff" it but tuck it betwixt lip and gum, just like using Copenhagen. It also seems to be limited to men. I didn't see any women using it. I also never saw women smoking cigarettes but occasionally saw men who had come from the city smoking. I assume cigarettes are too expensive a habit for the villagers.

       David Levine
      360-535-3875


    • Ed Jones
      Hello Dave:   I am not an expert by any means, but I am an observer and fan of the Dogon Peoples and can share some of the basic info that I know and have
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 10, 2008
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        Hello Dave:

         

        I am not an expert by any means, but I am an observer and fan of the Dogon Peoples and can share some of the basic info that I know and have learned about them.  I would love to visit them as with many others...

         

        The Kanaga, Walu, Sirige and the occasional Yashigine masks are danced along-side the Chiwara mask for example.  Many of the Dogon Dances are now an inspiration among tourism these days, but as you may know, the most regarded ceremony is their "Dama" religious period which completes a period of mourning. The there are also other masks which are danced additionally with the Chiwara, of which are among my favorites, the Satimbe and Gotomingo.  I could be mistaken and could be confusing them with other African clans, but I thought (or recall) that "chewing" Kola or even green tobacco is also known to be used among women as well. 

         

        Anyway, how long a period of time have you visited the Dogon and do you frequent them often?

         

        Ed

          

        --- On Mon, 6/9/08, DZ Levine <davidzl_2000@...> wrote:

        From: DZ Levine <davidzl_2000@...>
        Subject: [African_Arts] Re: Unusual Bamana Mask -- Wokalo Kun
        To: African_Arts@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Monday, June 9, 2008, 11:31 AM

        Ed, tell me about the other masks danced with the Chiwarras, would you?
        Snuff: yes, it is a powdered green tobacco. I didn't try it. It is highly prized and seems to be  used in place of kola in the village. In fact, I haven't seen kola used at all.
        The folks don't "snuff" it but tuck it betwixt lip and gum, just like using Copenhagen. It also seems to be limited to men. I didn't see any women using it. I also never saw women smoking cigarettes but occasionally saw men who had come from the city smoking. I assume cigarettes are too expensive a habit for the villagers.

         David Levine
        360-535-3875



      • DZ Levine
        Ed, the chiwarras are Bamana. I m not aware of their use among the Dogon. As for kola, it s pretty ubiquitous in West Africa and chewed by both men and women.
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 11, 2008
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          Ed, the chiwarras are Bamana. I'm not aware of their use among the Dogon.
          As for kola, it's pretty ubiquitous in West Africa and chewed by both men and women. I was referring to the Bamana village in the Segou region where I've spent some time as a guest; 9 days in January and 5 days in December of 2007. Not as long as I'd like to spend, but what I did spend was "total immersion". I was in the southern Dogon country for a week last December, as well, so I am hardly an expert on either one.

           David Levine
          360-535-3875


        • Ed Jones
          Hi Dave.   I am quite aware that the Chiwara are Bamara (Mali), so are Dogon and others within Mali.  Now that I understand that you are
          Message 4 of 6 , Jun 11, 2008
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            Hi Dave.

             

            I am quite aware that the Chiwara are Bamara (Mali), so are Dogon and others within Mali.  Now that I understand that you are referring specifically to the Bamara village of the Segou region, you might know better than I.  I have no insight.

             

            These days, the truth holds clear, as a result of tourism one could find the Bamara and Dogon masks are danced together.  Perhaps traditionally, I can assume that this was not the intent and I cannot confirm... much is changing and evolving for various reasons.

             

            Ed   

            --- On Wed, 6/11/08, DZ Levine <davidzl_2000@...> wrote:

            From: DZ Levine <davidzl_2000@...>
            Subject: [African_Arts] Re: Unusual Bamana Mask -- Wokalo Kun
            To: African_Arts@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Wednesday, June 11, 2008, 3:48 AM

            Ed, the chiwarras are Bamana. I'm not aware of their use among the Dogon.
            As for kola, it's pretty ubiquitous in West Africa and chewed by both men and women. I was referring to the Bamana village in the Segou region where I've spent some time as a guest; 9 days in January and 5 days in December of 2007. Not as long as I'd like to spend, but what I did spend was "total immersion". I was in the southern Dogon country for a week last December, as well, so I am hardly an expert on either one.

             David Levine
            360-535-3875



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