Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

More than Walking sticks?

Expand Messages
  • doc47
    Interesting discussion on Gullah culture. Thanks. In terms of survival of carving wouldn t voodoo dolls be a survival? Are there examples from the US? Now, to
    Message 1 of 11 , Mar 29 3:53 PM
    • 0 Attachment
      Interesting discussion on Gullah culture. Thanks. In terms of survival
      of carving wouldn't voodoo dolls be a survival? Are there examples
      from the US?

      Now, to my subject:
      While I was in West Africa I noticed many homes where the men owned
      walking sticks or canes. Some were carved, others plain. In one man's
      house there were probably a dozen or so, all showing evidence of age
      and use. I asked about them and the gentleman indicated that some were
      walking sticks but hinted that others were more than that; that they
      held some sort of power.

      Can anyone enlighten me on this?
    • M.E.F.
      More than Power , they are a Status symbol, especially in East Africa, M ... From: doc47 To: African_Arts@yahoogroups.com Sent:
      Message 2 of 11 , Mar 29 11:00 PM
      • 0 Attachment
        More than "Power", they are a "Status" symbol, especially in East Africa, M

        ----- Original Message ----
        From: doc47 <davidzl_2000@...>
        To: African_Arts@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sunday, March 30, 2008 1:53:12 AM
        Subject: [African_Arts] More than Walking sticks?

        Interesting discussion on Gullah culture. Thanks. In terms of survival
        of carving wouldn't voodoo dolls be a survival? Are there examples
        from the US?

        Now, to my subject:
        While I was in West Africa I noticed many homes where the men owned
        walking sticks or canes. Some were carved, others plain. In one man's
        house there were probably a dozen or so, all showing evidence of age
        and use. I asked about them and the gentleman indicated that some were
        walking sticks but hinted that others were more than that; that they
        held some sort of power.

        Can anyone enlighten me on this?




        OMG, Sweet deal for Yahoo! users/friends: Get A Month of Blockbuster Total Access, No Cost. W00t
      • walberto
        While something could be said about African sticks in general and more particularly about their use in West Africa, knowing what group or groups you visited
        Message 3 of 11 , Mar 30 9:52 AM
        • 0 Attachment
          While something could be said about African sticks in
          general and more particularly about their use in West
          Africa, knowing what group or groups you visited would
          be a plus...

          --- doc47 <davidzl_2000@...> wrote:

          > Interesting discussion on Gullah culture. Thanks. In
          > terms of survival
          > of carving wouldn't voodoo dolls be a survival? Are
          > there examples
          > from the US?
          >
          > Now, to my subject:
          > While I was in West Africa I noticed many homes
          > where the men owned
          > walking sticks or canes. Some were carved, others
          > plain. In one man's
          > house there were probably a dozen or so, all showing
          > evidence of age
          > and use. I asked about them and the gentleman
          > indicated that some were
          > walking sticks but hinted that others were more than
          > that; that they
          > held some sort of power.
          >
          > Can anyone enlighten me on this?
          >
          >



          ____________________________________________________________________________________
          Special deal for Yahoo! users & friends - No Cost. Get a month of Blockbuster Total Access now
          http://tc.deals.yahoo.com/tc/blockbuster/text3.com
        • Lee Rubinstein
          David: I agree with Walberto that it is difficult to respond regarding the general class of walking sticks or canes (or possibly staffs?) without images
          Message 4 of 11 , Mar 30 12:33 PM
          • 0 Attachment
            David:

            I agree with "Walberto" that it is difficult to respond regarding the general class of walking sticks or canes (or possibly staffs?) without images and/or more detailed, specific information such as geographical locations and cultural settings. However, one good starting point is to explore a database such as the one at the AMNH (go to http://anthro.amnh.org/, click on Collections Database, then "African Ethnographic Collection) and search cane, walking stick, staff, etc.,  to see if you can locate examples similar to the examples to which you refer and references which will allow you to focus your query.    Do keep in mind, however, that the classifications and attributions -- generated over time and by various cataloguers -- derive from the information available to the cataloguer and do not necessarily reflect indigenous classifications and/or wholly accurate information.  Most object images do, however, provide links to hand-written catalogue entries with dates, donors and collection information, when available.  Through such a search, you may at least find further points of departure from which to investigate more specific instances of the forms in question.  

            Below is a selection of objects I found by searching cane, walking stick and staff.  You can also delimit your search by geography or culture...

            Lee

            Ghana (90.1/5570) 

            Liberia (90.1/7552)

            Cane/Liberia (90.1/7578)

            Staff/Gio, Liberia.  (90.2/2444):

            Staff/Kran, Guéré.  Liberia. (90.2/9384):

            Cane/Dagomba.Togo, (1/6445)

            Cane/Angas.  Nigeria.  (90.2/2989):

            Staff/Nupe? (Jebba).  Nigeria (90.0/245)

            Staff/Yoruba/Oyo.  Nigeria. (90.1/9648):


            Cane/Bulu, Ntum.  Cameroon. (90.2/5875):

            Staff/Cameroon.  (90.1/7932):

            Staff/Cameroon.  (90.1/7941):


            On Mar 30, 2008, at 12:52 PM, walberto wrote:

            While something could be said about African sticks in
            general and more particularly about their use in West
            Africa, knowing what group or groups you visited would
            be a plus...

            --- doc47 <davidzl_2000@ yahoo.com> wrote:

            > Interesting discussion on Gullah culture. Thanks. In
            > terms of survival
            > of carving wouldn't voodoo dolls be a survival? Are
            > there examples
            > from the US?
            > 
            > Now, to my subject:
            > While I was in West Africa I noticed many homes
            > where the men owned
            > walking sticks or canes. Some were carved, others
            > plain. In one man's
            > house there were probably a dozen or so, all showing
            > evidence of age
            > and use. I asked about them and the gentleman
            > indicated that some were
            > walking sticks but hinted that others were more than
            > that; that they
            > held some sort of power.
            > 
            > Can anyone enlighten me on this?
            > 
            > 

            ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
            Special deal for Yahoo! users & friends - No Cost. Get a month of Blockbuster Total Access now 
            http://tc.deals. yahoo.com/ tc/blockbuster/ text3.com


          • GARYGLS2000@aol.com
            The discussion about walking sticks brought back an experience I had with a runner in 1992. I received a call saying this fellow had just come from Liberia
            Message 5 of 11 , Apr 1, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              The discussion about "walking sticks" brought back an experience I had with a "runner" in 1992. I received a call saying this fellow had just come from Liberia and had some "African art" he wanted to sell. I visited him at his hotel room on the Upper West Side of Manhattan and examined the "pieces" he had come with. Everything was either poorly carved or made for the tourist trade. As I was about to leave, he said "Wait, one more thing." He went over to the corner of the room and began unwrapping a long object covered with wrapping paper and tape. Having lived in Sierra Leone for a few years, I immediately recognized what he was showing me - an authentic turn-of-the-century Paramount Chief's staff of office with the original brass crown bearing the Coat of Arms of Great Britain. There were 41 of these, manufactured in England,  and presented in 1897 by Queen Victoria to the Paramount Chiefs when the British Protectorate was established over the hinterland. This one was engraved, "Sierra Leone, 18." I asked him what it was. "Its a chief's walking stick", he said. "Where did you get it?" "I bought it from the chief's family", he said. No way! These staffs belong to the Chiefdom and when a Paramount Chief dies, it passes on to his or her (yes, there are female Paramount Chiefs) successor. Not wanting to see it disappear into circulation, I bought it from him for $ 300.
               
              I went back to Sierra Leone in 1994 with the intention of returning the staff to whatever Chiefdom it came from. I brought pictures of the stafff with me. I met with the 27 year-old Vice Chairman of the Sierra Leone Government (one of the junior officers who staged a coup in 1962) who recognized what it was and sent me to meet with the head of the Chiefdom Affairs Department but no one could identify Staff Number 18. One of the Freetown newspapers ran a story asking people to come forward with information about its origin but to no avail. Later  I checked with the Commonwealth Office in London. They had no lists of these staffs.
               
              Since then I learned there are two possible explanations for the emergence of the staff. The more innocent explanation is that some chiedoms were amalgamated in the 1940's and their staffs became redundant. Thus the explanation that the chief's family sold it could be true. On the other hand, a few Paramount Chief's, especially in the south-eastern part of Sierra Leone, were murdered by the rebels and their staffs were stolen and sold off to Madingoe traders. The truth wil probably never be know.
               
              The "Chief's walking stick" still resides in my apartment awaiting return to its rightful owners.


              -----Original Message-----
              From: doc47 <davidzl_2000@...>
              To: African_Arts@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Sat, 29 Mar 2008 6:53 pm
              Subject: [African_Arts] More than Walking sticks?

              Interesting discussion on Gullah culture. Thanks. In terms of survival
              of carving wouldn't voodoo dolls be a survival? Are there examples
              from the US?

              Now, to my subject:
              While I was in West Africa I noticed many homes where the men owned
              walking sticks or canes. Some were carved, others plain. In one man's
              house there were probably a dozen or so, all showing evidence of age
              and use. I asked about them and the gentleman indicated that some were
              walking sticks but hinted that others were more than that; that they
              held some sort of power.

              Can anyone enlighten me on this?

            • michael trupp
              Gary, would you be able to post a pic of this stick as your story was very interesting I too would like to see it. Thank you in advance. Michael
              Message 6 of 11 , Apr 1, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                Gary, would you be able to post a pic of this stick as your story was very interesting I too would like to see it.
                Thank you in advance.
                Michael

                GARYGLS2000@... wrote:
                The discussion about "walking sticks" brought back an experience I had with a "runner" in 1992. I received a call saying this fellow had just come from Liberia and had some "African art" he wanted to sell. I visited him at his hotel room on the Upper West Side of Manhattan and examined the "pieces" he had come with. Everything was either poorly carved or made for the tourist trade. As I was about to leave, he said "Wait, one more thing." He went over to the corner of the room and began unwrapping a long object covered with wrapping paper and tape. Having lived in Sierra Leone for a few years, I immediately recognized what he was showing me - an authentic turn-of-the- century Paramount Chief's staff of office with the original brass crown bearing the Coat of Arms of Great Britain. There were 41 of these, manufactured in England,  and presented in 1897 by Queen Victoria to the Paramount Chiefs when the British Protectorate was established over the hinterland. This one was engraved, "Sierra Leone, 18." I asked him what it was. "Its a chief's walking stick", he said. "Where did you get it?" "I bought it from the chief's family", he said. No way! These staffs belong to the Chiefdom and when a Paramount Chief dies, it passes on to his or her (yes, there are female Paramount Chiefs) successor. Not wanting to see it disappear into circulation, I bought it from him for $ 300.
                 
                I went back to Sierra Leone in 1994 with the intention of returning the staff to whatever Chiefdom it came from. I brought pictures of the stafff with me. I met with the 27 year-old Vice Chairman of the Sierra Leone Government (one of the junior officers who staged a coup in 1962) who recognized what it was and sent me to meet with the head of the Chiefdom Affairs Department but no one could identify Staff Number 18. One of the Freetown newspapers ran a story asking people to come forward with information about its origin but to no avail. Later  I checked with the Commonwealth Office in London. They had no lists of these staffs.
                 
                Since then I learned there are two possible explanations for the emergence of the staff. The more innocent explanation is that some chiedoms were amalgamated in the 1940's and their staffs became redundant. Thus the explanation that the chief's family sold it could be true. On the other hand, a few Paramount Chief's, especially in the south-eastern part of Sierra Leone, were murdered by the rebels and their staffs were stolen and sold off to Madingoe traders. The truth wil probably never be know.
                 
                The "Chief's walking stick" still resides in my apartment awaiting return to its rightful owners.


                -----Original Message-----
                From: doc47 <davidzl_2000@ yahoo.com>
                To: African_Arts@ yahoogroups. com
                Sent: Sat, 29 Mar 2008 6:53 pm
                Subject: [African_Arts] More than Walking sticks?

                Interesting discussion on Gullah culture. Thanks. In terms of survival
                of carving wouldn't voodoo dolls be a survival? Are there examples
                from the US?

                Now, to my subject:
                While I was in West Africa I noticed many homes where the men owned
                walking sticks or canes. Some were carved, others plain. In one man's
                house there were probably a dozen or so, all showing evidence of age
                and use. I asked about them and the gentleman indicated that some were
                walking sticks but hinted that others were more than that; that they
                held some sort of power.

                Can anyone enlighten me on this?



                You rock. That's why Blockbuster's offering you one month of Blockbuster Total Access, No Cost.

              • M.E.F.
                Wow, Gary, what a story! Thanks, M ... From: GARYGLS2000@aol.com To: African_Arts@yahoogroups.com Sent: Tuesday, April 1, 2008 8:28:12
                Message 7 of 11 , Apr 1, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  Wow, Gary, what a story! Thanks, M

                  ----- Original Message ----
                  From: "GARYGLS2000@..." <GARYGLS2000@...>
                  To: African_Arts@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Tuesday, April 1, 2008 8:28:12 PM
                  Subject: Re: [African_Arts] More than Walking sticks?

                  The discussion about "walking sticks" brought back an experience I had with a "runner" in 1992. I received a call saying this fellow had just come from Liberia and had some "African art" he wanted to sell. I visited him at his hotel room on the Upper West Side of Manhattan and examined the "pieces" he had come with. Everything was either poorly carved or made for the tourist trade. As I was about to leave, he said "Wait, one more thing." He went over to the corner of the room and began unwrapping a long object covered with wrapping paper and tape. Having lived in Sierra Leone for a few years, I immediately recognized what he was showing me - an authentic turn-of-the- century Paramount Chief's staff of office with the original brass crown bearing the Coat of Arms of Great Britain. There were 41 of these, manufactured in England,  and presented in 1897 by Queen Victoria to the Paramount Chiefs when the British Protectorate was established over the hinterland. This one was engraved, "Sierra Leone, 18." I asked him what it was. "Its a chief's walking stick", he said. "Where did you get it?" "I bought it from the chief's family", he said. No way! These staffs belong to the Chiefdom and when a Paramount Chief dies, it passes on to his or her (yes, there are female Paramount Chiefs) successor. Not wanting to see it disappear into circulation, I bought it from him for $ 300.
                   
                  I went back to Sierra Leone in 1994 with the intention of returning the staff to whatever Chiefdom it came from. I brought pictures of the stafff with me. I met with the 27 year-old Vice Chairman of the Sierra Leone Government (one of the junior officers who staged a coup in 1962) who recognized what it was and sent me to meet with the head of the Chiefdom Affairs Department but no one could identify Staff Number 18. One of the Freetown newspapers ran a story asking people to come forward with information about its origin but to no avail. Later  I checked with the Commonwealth Office in London. They had no lists of these staffs.
                   
                  Since then I learned there are two possible explanations for the emergence of the staff. The more innocent explanation is that some chiedoms were amalgamated in the 1940's and their staffs became redundant. Thus the explanation that the chief's family sold it could be true. On the other hand, a few Paramount Chief's, especially in the south-eastern part of Sierra Leone, were murdered by the rebels and their staffs were stolen and sold off to Madingoe traders. The truth wil probably never be know.
                   
                  The "Chief's walking stick" still resides in my apartment awaiting return to its rightful owners.


                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: doc47 <davidzl_2000@ yahoo.com>
                  To: African_Arts@ yahoogroups. com
                  Sent: Sat, 29 Mar 2008 6:53 pm
                  Subject: [African_Arts] More than Walking sticks?

                  Interesting discussion on Gullah culture. Thanks. In terms of survival
                  of carving wouldn't voodoo dolls be a survival? Are there examples
                  from the US?

                  Now, to my subject:
                  While I was in West Africa I noticed many homes where the men owned
                  walking sticks or canes. Some were carved, others plain. In one man's
                  house there were probably a dozen or so, all showing evidence of age
                  and use. I asked about them and the gentleman indicated that some were
                  walking sticks but hinted that others were more than that; that they
                  held some sort of power.

                  Can anyone enlighten me on this?




                  You rock. That's why Blockbuster's offering you one month of Blockbuster Total Access, No Cost.
                • DZ Levine
                  Gary, very interesting story. Thank you. I, too, would appreciate seeing a photo of the staff. David Levine David Levine 360-535-3875 ... You rock. That s why
                  Message 8 of 11 , Apr 2, 2008
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Gary, very interesting story. Thank you. I, too, would appreciate seeing a photo of the staff.
                    David Levine


                  • GARYGLS2000@aol.com
                    I am posting pictures under Paramount Chief s Staff http://ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/African_Arts/photos/browse/4dde **************Create a Home Theater
                    Message 9 of 11 , Apr 2, 2008
                    • 0 Attachment
                      I am posting pictures under "Paramount Chief's Staff"
                      http://ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/African_Arts/photos/browse/4dde /



                    • GARYGLS2000@aol.com
                      David, I posted pictures of the Sierra Leone Paramount Chief s Staff under Pictures on the African-Arts website. **************Planning your summer road
                      Message 10 of 11 , Apr 3, 2008
                      • 0 Attachment
                        David, I posted pictures of the Sierra Leone Paramount Chief's Staff under "Pictures" on the African-Arts website: http://ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/African_Arts/photos/browse/4dde



                      • DZ Levine
                        Gary, Thanks, I checked it out yesterday. Quite a wonderful thing! I admire your efforts to repatriate the staff. David David Levine 360-535-3875
                        Message 11 of 11 , Apr 4, 2008
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Gary, Thanks, I checked it out yesterday. Quite a wonderful thing! I admire your efforts to repatriate the staff.
                          David


                           David Levine
                          360-535-3875

                        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.