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Re: [African_Arts] baltimoresun.com - Critical Mass: African art at the BMA

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  • Lee Rubinstein
    For those considering a visit to the Baltimore Museum of Art, here are some additional links regarding the current exhibition, Meditations on African Art:
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 12 2:27 PM
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      For those considering a visit to the Baltimore Museum of Art, here are some additional links regarding the current exhibition, "Meditations on African Art:  Pattern" and the African Collection.


      Previous Phases of the 3-part "Meditations on African Art series of exhibitions at the BMA:


      Maiden Spirit Mask (Mukuyi). Early 20th Century. Punu, Gabon. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Gift of Alan Wurtzburger, BMA 1954.145.63
      Meditations on African Art: Color
      The second in a three-part series exploring light, color, and pattern in the BMA’s distinguished collection of African art, Meditations on African Art: Color is the first exhibition of its kind to explore the symbolism of the African color trinity of red, black, and white. The exhibition showcases 30 rarely seen masks from the BMA’s collection, grouped by color on the gallery walls along with a display of tri-color masks in the center of the gallery, and a site-specific installation by Tunisian-born Swiss artist Fatma Charfi.

      Dance Mask with Superstructure (D’mba). Late 19th - mid-20th century. Baga/Buluñits, Guinea. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Gift of Alan Wurtzburger, BMA 1957.97
      Meditations on African Art: Light  The first exhibition in a three-part series that explores light, color, and pattern in objects from the BMA’s distinguished collection of African art, Light features more than 40 works, including a recently acquired contemporary bead painting by Yoruba artist Jimoh Buraimoh and the BMA's world-renowned Baga D'mba (seen in the round for the first time in decades). Varying light levels in the galleries will reveal the objects as they were meant to be viewed, including vibrant works of art intended to radiate spiritually, those that were meant to dazzle during sunlit performances, and pieces intended for the shadows or nighttime performances. The BMA has also invited internationally renowned Ethiopian video artist Theo Eshetu to create a contemporary light-based work for the gallery.

      See an introduction to the African collection at the BMA at http://www.artbma.org/collection/overview/african.html and...


      Also from the Baltimore Museum of Art comes the fine book, See the Music, Hear the Dance:  Rethinking African Art at the Baltimore Museum of Art (Munich, Berlin, London, New York:  Prestel.  2004.)  Edited by Frederick Lamp, See the Music ... features an extensive selection of works from the Museum's collection annotated by a notable and equally vast range of contributors. The book provides excellent access to works in the Museum's collection coupled with concise but insightful commentaries on the works' contextual histories, uses and and meanings. 

      Lee

      On Mar 12, 2008, at 4:26 PM, ari birnbaum wrote:


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