Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Bugs in a Bobo mask?????

Expand Messages
  • Bill Marsh
    Recently I bought a Bobo mask. It has a little damage from insects. Well I dusted it off and hung it on my wall. Well the dust is still coming. Very fine wood
    Message 1 of 20 , Apr 7, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      Recently I bought a Bobo mask. It has a little damage from insects.

      Well I dusted it off and hung it on my wall. Well the dust is still
      coming. Very fine wood dust.

      I Think that something is living in there and eating my mask!!!

      I took it down and put it out in my warehouse, isolating it from
      everything.

      I don't see anything going on with other masks hung near it, but I am
      a little concerned. It took about three months to make maybe a
      teaspoon of dust.

      What should I do?
    • Florent Morio
      Hi Bill, You re right, something is living in your mask. I know one method you can try. It s very easy. Take your mask and freeze it for a few days !
      Message 2 of 20 , Apr 7, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi Bill,

        You're right, something is living in your mask.
        I know one method you can try. It's very easy.
        Take your mask and freeze it for a few days !

        Sincerely,

        Florent




        At 13:41 07/04/2007, you wrote:

        Recently I bought a Bobo mask. It has a little damage from insects.

        Well I dusted it off and hung it on my wall. Well the dust is still
        coming. Very fine wood dust.

        I Think that something is living in there and eating my mask!!!

        I took it down and put it out in my warehouse, isolating it from
        everything.

        I don't see anything going on with other masks hung near it, but I am
        a little concerned. It took about three months to make maybe a
        teaspoon of dust.

        What should I do?


        No virus found in this incoming message.
        Checked by AVG Free Edition.
        Version: 7.5.446 / Virus Database: 268.18.26/750 - Release Date: 06/04/2007 21:30
        ___________________________________________________________________________ Yahoo! Mail réinvente le mail ! Découvrez le nouveau Yahoo! Mail et son interface révolutionnaire. http://fr.mail.yahoo.com
      • RAND (Rand African Art)
        Hi Bill, Most likely what you are experiencing is a problem with a bug commonly referred to as a powder post beetle . I have had experience with powder post
        Message 3 of 20 , Apr 7, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi Bill,
          Most likely what you are experiencing is a problem with a bug commonly referred to as a "powder post beetle". I have had experience with powder post beetles a couple of times in the past and I think we've had discussions in the group as well, it's not an uncommon problem.
          If the piece is small enough, the best cure is to wrap it in a plastic bag and put it in a deep freezer for 3-4 days. The freezer in your refrigerator usually won't get cold enough to properly freeze the beetles and their eggs, so you'll need to use a stand alone deep freezer that you can get down to as close to zero as you can. Leave it in for a few days then take it out for a few days and then freeze it again for a few days. This process should kill the beetles and the eggs.
           
          Just keep an eye on it afterwards and repeat the process if necessary. I haven't had any experience of the the beetles spreading to other masks or objects near the one that had them in it originally, but it's probably not a bad idea to keep watch.
          If the piece is too large you'll have to look into other options. Several people I've talked to have had luck with contacting meat packing plants in their areas and arranging to bring the piece down to their freezer rooms and leaving them for a week or so. It can be a bit of a chore, especially with a 7 foot tall statue, but their freezers are large and they get cold enough to do the trick.
          The other option is to contact an exterminator and talk to them about it. The object will usually need to be placed in an isolated and enclosed area where they can fumigate it properly. This option is a little more expensive.
          I hope that helps some.
          RAND
          Below are some sites that I looked at when I initially researched the problem and they may be of some help to you.
          Powder post beetles
          Photos of damage
          Exit holes
          Article from Michigan State University Extension Office
          Background
          Control
          Overview including links to pictures
          “Bora-Care” product
          Termites
          BORIC ACID DUSTS
          Boric acid dusts have also been shown to be effective termiticides.
          Subterranean termites can also be controlled with the use of non-toxic baits such as boric acid (e.g. Bora-Care®) within an attractant such as moistened corrugated cardboard.
          Boric acid, Bora-Care®, and boric acid termite baits, can all be purchased commercially by the general public.  Homeowners can now bait their own termites and hope for good results.
          Borates are relatively non-toxic to humans and animals, are odorless, do not discolor wood, do not vaporize, do not provoke allergic skin responses, do not cause cancer, and are quite safe if properly used. Treated wood is also fire resistant when large enough concentrations are used. Keep in mind that borates are also herbicides, so if they leach from the wood, they have the potential to kill plants as well.
          http://www.symbios-witticism-page.com/bug.htm#19


          Bill Marsh <woolygums@...> wrote:
          Recently I bought a Bobo mask. It has a little damage from insects.

          Well I dusted it off and hung it on my wall. Well the dust is still
          coming. Very fine wood dust.

          I Think that something is living in there and eating my mask!!!

          I took it down and put it out in my warehouse, isolating it from
          everything.

          I don't see anything going on with other masks hung near it, but I am
          a little concerned. It took about three months to make maybe a
          teaspoon of dust.

          What should I do?


        • Lee Rubinstein
          Bill: Although this claim is not scientific, lighter woods which are more logically and logistically appropriate for masks (particularly from Burkina Faso or
          Message 4 of 20 , Apr 7, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            Bill:

            Although this claim is not scientific, lighter woods which are more logically and logistically appropriate for masks (particularly from Burkina Faso or Mali, in my experience) do seem particularly vulnerable to this type of infestation.  I have never seen an any sign that these insects travel from one mask or statue to another, but it can be exceedingly difficult to eradicate them from their host object.   This is not a scientific observation and may simply result from the fact that once the problem insect has found its "morsel" there is no particular reason for it to migrate.  In any case, I have never observed any sign of "contagion."  I have effectively eradicated any sign of damage with borer/miner insecticides through repeated applications, but one must use extreme care in pinpointing the source with an eyedropper or a syringe that injects the liquid into the object sparingly in a volume that can be absorbed into the wood.  Do not allow applications to spread onto the surface or flush through the channel. Keep in mind that liquid flows, and if there is a hole at either end of the channel through which the insect travels, there may be leakage through an undetected surface opening.  Generalized surface applications or leakages due to excessive applications result in a continual re-appearance of an opaque white powder on the object's surface, so if you can conquer the pests with temperature control, this would likely be preferable.   

            Lee

            Lee Rubinstein
            P.O. Box 1109
            Buckingham, PA   18912
            215/794-7814



          • brierleyalison
            Hi Bill! I have another idea! I was told that if you place the object in a plastic bag and use a vaccum cleaner hose to suck the air out, the host insects
            Message 5 of 20 , Apr 7, 2007
            • 0 Attachment
              Hi Bill!
              I have another idea! I was told that if you place the object in a
              plastic bag and use a vaccum cleaner hose to suck the air out, the host
              insects suffocate.
              I think this has to be repeated a few times to make sure any new
              hatchlings are also treated.
              Alison.
            • annporteus
              ... Hi Bill, Have a look at this link: http://palimpsest.stanford.edu/byauth/motylewski/pestnote.html Scroll down to: Heat, Cold, and CO2 Low-Oxygen
              Message 6 of 20 , Apr 7, 2007
              • 0 Attachment
                --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "Bill Marsh" <woolygums@...> wrote:
                >
                > Recently I bought a Bobo mask. It has a little damage from insects.
                >
                > Well I dusted it off and hung it on my wall. Well the dust is still
                > coming. Very fine wood dust.
                >
                > I Think that something is living in there and eating my mask!!!
                >
                > I took it down and put it out in my warehouse, isolating it from
                > everything.
                >
                > I don't see anything going on with other masks hung near it, but I am
                > a little concerned. It took about three months to make maybe a
                > teaspoon of dust.
                >
                > What should I do?
                >

                Hi Bill,
                Have a look at this link:
                http://palimpsest.stanford.edu/byauth/motylewski/pestnote.html
                Scroll down to:
                Heat, Cold, and CO2
                Low-Oxygen Environments
                These creatures love warm coastal temperatures especially humidity.

                My containers from Africa take 3 months to arrive.
                The containers are not ventilated and if not fumigated before
                departure the insects get very excited each time they cross the
                equator. Australian Quarantine also get very excited if when they open
                the container the termites have been breeding and some fly out!!!
                Quarantine officers do not like these visitors to our country so I
                have to have the lot fumigated at both ends. During the past 17 years
                this method seems to have exterminated everything - even in huge pieces.
                But then if we ship by sea to the US after more than a month in
                Australia the American authorities may also demand a third fumigation.
                Fortunately they do not worry if we ship by air. Jet lagged termites
                are obviously not a problem.

                Most pieces that I buy from villages seem to have evidence of some
                form of life so I guess that fumigation is good.
                ann
              • teapotd0me
                A fellow member suggested a thorough flushing of the affected area with gasoline. I tried this on one piece with success. The gasoline odor will fade away
                Message 7 of 20 , Apr 8, 2007
                • 0 Attachment
                  A fellow member suggested a thorough flushing of the affected area with
                  gasoline. I tried this on one piece with success. The gasoline odor
                  will fade away after a week or so.

                  HTH
                  Chris

                  --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "Bill Marsh" <woolygums@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Recently I bought a Bobo mask. It has a little damage from insects.
                  >
                  > Well I dusted it off and hung it on my wall. Well the dust is still
                  > coming. Very fine wood dust.
                  >
                  > I Think that something is living in there and eating my mask!!!
                  >
                  > I took it down and put it out in my warehouse, isolating it from
                  > everything.
                  >
                  > I don't see anything going on with other masks hung near it, but I am
                  > a little concerned. It took about three months to make maybe a
                  > teaspoon of dust.
                  >
                  > What should I do?
                  >
                • Steve Price
                  Hi Chris I d worry about a gasoline wash extracting the oils from an oily wood. Otherwise, I suspect that the gasoline fumes would be pretty toxic. My
                  Message 8 of 20 , Apr 8, 2007
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Hi Chris

                    I'd worry about a gasoline wash extracting the oils from an oily
                    wood. Otherwise, I suspect that the gasoline fumes would be pretty
                    toxic. My personal preference is still for a couple of cycles of
                    freezing and thawing in a zero degree freezer. It's safe for you,
                    it's safe for the wood and everything that's attached to it, it's
                    easy, and it will kill anything that's living in there.

                    Regards

                    Steve Price

                    --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "teapotd0me" <teapotd0me@...>
                    wrote:
                    >
                    > A fellow member suggested a thorough flushing of the affected area
                    with
                    > gasoline. I tried this on one piece with success. The gasoline
                    odor
                    > will fade away after a week or so.
                    >
                    > HTH
                    > Chris
                    >
                    > --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "Bill Marsh" <woolygums@>
                    wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Recently I bought a Bobo mask. It has a little damage from
                    insects.
                    > >
                    > > Well I dusted it off and hung it on my wall. Well the dust is
                    still
                    > > coming. Very fine wood dust.
                    > >
                    > > I Think that something is living in there and eating my mask!!!
                    > >
                    > > I took it down and put it out in my warehouse, isolating it from
                    > > everything.
                    > >
                    > > I don't see anything going on with other masks hung near it, but
                    I am
                    > > a little concerned. It took about three months to make maybe a
                    > > teaspoon of dust.
                    > >
                    > > What should I do?
                    > >
                    >
                  • David Rilling
                    I agree with Chris. An old woodworker told me about this some years ago. I ve used the method on small and large pieces with 100% success for many years. I
                    Message 9 of 20 , Apr 8, 2007
                    • 0 Attachment
                      I agree with Chris. An old woodworker told me about this some years ago. I've used the method on small and large pieces with 100% success for many years. I take the piece outside and soak it with gasoline thoroughly. Then I leave it outside for about a week until the gasoline odor leaves. Believe it or not this really works well, is harmless and does not affect the piece in any way. Not the surface nor the patina nor the color. I highly recommend it. Even with gasoline at $3 a gallon. The other method is bromide fumigation which costs $500. I'll go with the gas.
                      Dave Rilling
                      Gallerie Nimba


                      On Apr 8, 2007, at 8:40 AM, teapotd0me wrote:

                      A fellow member suggested a thorough flushing of the affected area with
                      gasoline. I tried this on one piece with success. The gasoline odor
                      will fade away after a week or so.

                      HTH
                      Chris

                      --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "Bill Marsh" <woolygums@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Recently I bought a Bobo mask. It has a little damage from insects.
                      >
                      > Well I dusted it off and hung it on my wall. Well the dust is still
                      > coming. Very fine wood dust.
                      >
                      > I Think that something is living in there and eating my mask!!!
                      >
                      > I took it down and put it out in my warehouse, isolating it from
                      > everything.
                      >
                      > I don't see anything going on with other masks hung near it, but I am
                      > a little concerned. It took about three months to make maybe a
                      > teaspoon of dust.
                      >
                      > What should I do?
                      >


                    • David Rilling
                      I agree with Steve. Freeze the smaller pieces and if you can t then gasoline them. Especially the larger pieces that won t fit into a freezer. In my own
                      Message 10 of 20 , Apr 8, 2007
                      • 0 Attachment
                        I agree with Steve. Freeze the smaller pieces and if you can't then gasoline them. Especially the larger pieces that won't fit into a freezer. In my own experience the gasoline does not affect the oils. Do this out of doors in order to avoid the fumes.
                        Dave

                        On Apr 8, 2007, at 9:48 AM, Steve Price wrote:

                        Hi Chris

                        I'd worry about a gasoline wash extracting the oils from an oily
                        wood. Otherwise, I suspect that the gasoline fumes would be pretty
                        toxic. My personal preference is still for a couple of cycles of
                        freezing and thawing in a zero degree freezer. It's safe for you,
                        it's safe for the wood and everything that's attached to it, it's
                        easy, and it will kill anything that's living in there.

                        Regards

                        Steve Price

                        --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "teapotd0me" <teapotd0me@...>
                        wrote:
                        >
                        > A fellow member suggested a thorough flushing of the affected area
                        with
                        > gasoline. I tried this on one piece with success. The gasoline
                        odor
                        > will fade away after a week or so.
                        >
                        > HTH
                        > Chris
                        >
                        > --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "Bill Marsh" <woolygums@>
                        wrote:
                        > >
                        > > Recently I bought a Bobo mask. It has a little damage from
                        insects.
                        > >
                        > > Well I dusted it off and hung it on my wall. Well the dust is
                        still
                        > > coming. Very fine wood dust.
                        > >
                        > > I Think that something is living in there and eating my mask!!!
                        > >
                        > > I took it down and put it out in my warehouse, isolating it from
                        > > everything.
                        > >
                        > > I don't see anything going on with other masks hung near it, but
                        I am
                        > > a little concerned. It took about three months to make maybe a
                        > > teaspoon of dust.
                        > >
                        > > What should I do?
                        > >
                        >


                      • RAND (Rand African Art)
                        Although I guess the gasoline method could work for some pieces, I m sure there are many that it could not work for, like a wooden mask with a feather
                        Message 11 of 20 , Apr 8, 2007
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Although I guess the gasoline method could work for some pieces, I'm sure there are many that it could not work for, like a wooden mask with a feather headdress for example. It just seems, at least to me, like this would be the least preferred method.
                           
                          I had never heard of this method, but in the past I have had people email me to ask me about a "petrol" kind of a smell on their mask that was very strong after they initially received it. I guess it would make sense that If something was treated in this way and then a couple of weeks or so later packed in plastic bubble wrap and shipped to someone, the smell could still be there initially (small amounts released in a closed type of environment) and would be odd to the person smelling it for the first time.
                           
                          Fumigation is also exposing something to toxic chemicals, but most fumigation methods don't involve (I don't think) soaking an object in a liquid like the gasoline method.
                           
                          I cringe at the thought of pouring gasoline all over my favorite Lobi figure, I'd MUCH rather pop it in the freezer off and on over the course of a week or so. This method is very effective and if you have a freezer, or a friend with a freezer, it's free.
                           
                          For larger objects a local meat packing plant will let you, for a minimal charge, place an object(s) in their walk in deep freezers if you completely wrap it in plastic. I know of several people who have done this with success. I am lucky living in Colorado where at times the temp will often stay close to zero for extended periods of time and I can use the back yard as a freezer.
                           
                          For me personally, I think I'll stay away from the gasoline method, but I guess pick the method that makes the best sense for you and your object and your situation.
                           
                           
                          FEATHERS, FUR and CLOTH:
                          Another thing that falls in line with this topic of conversation, that people may or may not be aware of, is the topic of insects that eat away at feathers and fur that are often found on objects from Africa. Sometimes it is less obvious with feathers and fur to see the damage, but there are insects that will eat away at feathers and fur.
                           
                          I store things in a small room in the basement of my house that I don't have out in the main living area of the house. I have a Luvala mask with feathers on top of the mask that I put down there in January of this year. Recently after discussions about feather eating insects with a member of the group, I went down to look at my mask and in one area in the back the feathers appeared much different than they used to, they didn't have that fluffy look. It was apparent that something had been eating away at them.
                           
                          The freezer method works very effectively at ridding your objects that have feather and fur on them of insects that can eat away at these materials. It was suggested to me that it's a good idea to freeze these types of objects periodically since it's often times hard to tell something is going on with them until quite a bit of damage has been done. (I wouldn't suggest the gasoline method on feathers )
                           
                          Below is an interesting article about feathers from the Bishop Museum:
                           
                          Cheers!
                          RAND


                          David Rilling <krilling@...> wrote:
                          I agree with Chris. An old woodworker told me about this some years ago. I've used the method on small and large pieces with 100% success for many years. I take the piece outside and soak it with gasoline thoroughly. Then I leave it outside for about a week until the gasoline odor leaves. Believe it or not this really works well, is harmless and does not affect the piece in any way. Not the surface nor the patina nor the color. I highly recommend it. Even with gasoline at $3 a gallon. The other method is bromide fumigation which costs $500. I'll go with the gas.
                          Dave Rilling
                          Gallerie Nimba


                          On Apr 8, 2007, at 8:40 AM, teapotd0me wrote:

                          A fellow member suggested a thorough flushing of the affected area with
                          gasoline. I tried this on one piece with success. The gasoline odor
                          will fade away after a week or so.

                          HTH
                          Chris

                          --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "Bill Marsh" <woolygums@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Recently I bought a Bobo mask. It has a little damage from insects.
                          >
                          > Well I dusted it off and hung it on my wall. Well the dust is still
                          > coming. Very fine wood dust.
                          >
                          > I Think that something is living in there and eating my mask!!!
                          >
                          > I took it down and put it out in my warehouse, isolating it from
                          > everything.
                          >
                          > I don't see anything going on with other masks hung near it, but I am
                          > a little concerned. It took about three months to make maybe a
                          > teaspoon of dust.
                          >
                          > What should I do?
                          >



                        • craig lewis
                          I ve never heard of the gasoline method (wouldn t it affect affect painted pieces?) and would probably agree with Steve that the freezing method may be the
                          Message 12 of 20 , Apr 8, 2007
                          • 0 Attachment
                            I've never heard of the "gasoline" method (wouldn't it affect affect painted pieces?)  and would probably agree with Steve that the freezing method may be the safest and best.
                            However I really wish I lived in the US where gasoline is ONLY
                             $3 a gallon rather than the UK where it is the equivalent of around $8-$9 per gallon!!!  
                            Cheers
                            Craig 
                            David Rilling <krilling@...> wrote:
                            I agree with Chris. An old woodworker told me about this some years ago. I've used the method on small and large pieces with 100% success for many years. I take the piece outside and soak it with gasoline thoroughly. Then I leave it outside for about a week until the gasoline odor leaves. Believe it or not this really works well, is harmless and does not affect the piece in any way. Not the surface nor the patina nor the color. I highly recommend it. Even with gasoline at $3 a gallon. The other method is bromide fumigation which costs $500. I'll go with the gas.
                            Dave Rilling
                            Gallerie Nimba


                            On Apr 8, 2007, at 8:40 AM, teapotd0me wrote:

                            A fellow member suggested a thorough flushing of the affected area with
                            gasoline. I tried this on one piece with success. The gasoline odor
                            will fade away after a week or so.

                            HTH
                            Chris

                            --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "Bill Marsh" <woolygums@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Recently I bought a Bobo mask. It has a little damage from insects.
                            >
                            > Well I dusted it off and hung it on my wall. Well the dust is still
                            > coming. Very fine wood dust.
                            >
                            > I Think that something is living in there and eating my mask!!!
                            >
                            > I took it down and put it out in my warehouse, isolating it from
                            > everything.
                            >
                            > I don't see anything going on with other masks hung near it, but I am
                            > a little concerned. It took about three months to make maybe a
                            > teaspoon of dust.
                            >
                            > What should I do?
                            >




                            The all-new Yahoo! Mail goes wherever you go - free your email address from your Internet provider.
                          • David Rilling
                            Hi Rand, Good points. I agree. Dave
                            Message 13 of 20 , Apr 8, 2007
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Hi Rand,
                              Good points. I agree.
                              Dave

                              On Apr 8, 2007, at 10:59 AM, RAND ((Rand African Art)) wrote:


                              Although I guess the gasoline method could work for some pieces, I'm sure there are many that it could not work for, like a wooden mask with a feather headdress for example. It just seems, at least to me, like this would be the least preferred method.
                               
                              I had never heard of this method, but in the past I have had people email me to ask me about a "petrol" kind of a smell on their mask that was very strong after they initially received it. I guess it would make sense that If something was treated in this way and then a couple of weeks or so later packed in plastic bubble wrap and shipped to someone, the smell could still be there initially (small amounts released in a closed type of environment) and would be odd to the person smelling it for the first time.
                               
                              Fumigation is also exposing something to toxic chemicals, but most fumigation methods don't involve (I don't think) soaking an object in a liquid like the gasoline method.
                               
                              I cringe at the thought of pouring gasoline all over my favorite Lobi figure, I'd MUCH rather pop it in the freezer off and on over the course of a week or so. This method is very effective and if you have a freezer, or a friend with a freezer, it's free.
                               
                              For larger objects a local meat packing plant will let you, for a minimal charge, place an object(s) in their walk in deep freezers if you completely wrap it in plastic. I know of several people who have done this with success. I am lucky living in Colorado where at times the temp will often stay close to zero for extended periods of time and I can use the back yard as a freezer.
                               
                              For me personally, I think I'll stay away from the gasoline method, but I guess pick the method that makes the best sense for you and your object and your situation.
                               
                               
                              FEATHERS, FUR and CLOTH:
                              Another thing that falls in line with this topic of conversation, that people may or may not be aware of, is the topic of insects that eat away at feathers and fur that are often found on objects from Africa. Sometimes it is less obvious with feathers and fur to see the damage, but there are insects that will eat away at feathers and fur.
                               
                              I store things in a small room in the basement of my house that I don't have out in the main living area of the house. I have a Luvala mask with feathers on top of the mask that I put down there in January of this year. Recently after discussions about feather eating insects with a member of the group, I went down to look at my mask and in one area in the back the feathers appeared much different than they used to, they didn't have that fluffy look. It was apparent that something had been eating away at them.
                               
                              The freezer method works very effectively at ridding your objects that have feather and fur on them of insects that can eat away at these materials. It was suggested to me that it's a good idea to freeze these types of objects periodically since it's often times hard to tell something is going on with them until quite a bit of damage has been done. (I wouldn't suggest the gasoline method on feathers )
                               
                              Below is an interesting article about feathers from the Bishop Museum:
                               
                              Cheers!
                              RAND


                              David Rilling <krilling@tradenet.net> wrote:
                              I agree with Chris. An old woodworker told me about this some years ago. I've used the method on small and large pieces with 100% success for many years. I take the piece outside and soak it with gasoline thoroughly. Then I leave it outside for about a week until the gasoline odor leaves. Believe it or not this really works well, is harmless and does not affect the piece in any way. Not the surface nor the patina nor the color. I highly recommend it. Even with gasoline at $3 a gallon. The other method is bromide fumigation which costs $500. I'll go with the gas.
                              Dave Rilling
                              Gallerie Nimba


                              On Apr 8, 2007, at 8:40 AM, teapotd0me wrote:

                              A fellow member suggested a thorough flushing of the affected area with
                              gasoline. I tried this on one piece with success. The gasoline odor
                              will fade away after a week or so.

                              HTH
                              Chris

                              --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "Bill Marsh" <woolygums@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Recently I bought a Bobo mask. It has a little damage from insects.
                              >
                              > Well I dusted it off and hung it on my wall. Well the dust is still
                              > coming. Very fine wood dust.
                              >
                              > I Think that something is living in there and eating my mask!!!
                              >
                              > I took it down and put it out in my warehouse, isolating it from
                              > everything.
                              >
                              > I don't see anything going on with other masks hung near it, but I am
                              > a little concerned. It took about three months to make maybe a
                              > teaspoon of dust.
                              >
                              > What should I do?
                              >





                            • Erik Lewandowski
                              I have successfully but not scientifically used mothballs to get rid of the bugs in two/three of my objects. That method is only good if used with a smaller
                              Message 14 of 20 , Apr 8, 2007
                              • 0 Attachment
                                I have successfully but not scientifically used mothballs to get rid of the bugs in two/three of my objects. That method is only good if used with a smaller size objects like masks or small figures. There are some commercial bags that can handle larger pieces, but this could be tricky to get your hands on one of them because they are not available for purchase to general public, unless you try internet. I had double bagged object with mothballs and left it for a month. I did work for me, I did not noticed the evidence of bug activity any more. Before taking object into the house I let it air out either in my garage or outside (weather permitting) to get rid off the smell of mothballs. As I said this is not proven scientifically, just from my own experience.  
                                 
                                Regards,
                                Erik

                                craig lewis <craig_n_emma@...> wrote:
                                I've never heard of the "gasoline" method (wouldn't it affect affect painted pieces?)  and would probably agree with Steve that the freezing method may be the safest and best.
                                However I really wish I lived in the US where gasoline is ONLY
                                 $3 a gallon rather than the UK where it is the equivalent of around $8-$9 per gallon!!!  
                                Cheers
                                Craig 
                                David Rilling <krilling@tradenet. net> wrote:
                                I agree with Chris. An old woodworker told me about this some years ago. I've used the method on small and large pieces with 100% success for many years. I take the piece outside and soak it with gasoline thoroughly. Then I leave it outside for about a week until the gasoline odor leaves. Believe it or not this really works well, is harmless and does not affect the piece in any way. Not the surface nor the patina nor the color. I highly recommend it. Even with gasoline at $3 a gallon. The other method is bromide fumigation which costs $500. I'll go with the gas.
                                Dave Rilling
                                Gallerie Nimba


                                On Apr 8, 2007, at 8:40 AM, teapotd0me wrote:

                                A fellow member suggested a thorough flushing of the affected area with
                                gasoline. I tried this on one piece with success. The gasoline odor
                                will fade away after a week or so.

                                HTH
                                Chris

                                --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "Bill Marsh" <woolygums@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Recently I bought a Bobo mask. It has a little damage from insects.
                                >
                                > Well I dusted it off and hung it on my wall. Well the dust is still
                                > coming. Very fine wood dust.
                                >
                                > I Think that something is living in there and eating my mask!!!
                                >
                                > I took it down and put it out in my warehouse, isolating it from
                                > everything.
                                >
                                > I don't see anything going on with other masks hung near it, but I am
                                > a little concerned. It took about three months to make maybe a
                                > teaspoon of dust.
                                >
                                > What should I do?
                                >




                                The all-new Yahoo! Mail goes wherever you go - free your email address from your Internet provider.

                              • Ann Porteus
                                There is some scientific evidence that naphthalene does work for some insects. see australian museum online at http://www.amonline.net.au/archive.cfm?id=869 I
                                Message 15 of 20 , Apr 8, 2007
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  There is some scientific evidence that naphthalene does work for some insects.
                                  see australian museum online at

                                  I have seen tourist carvings in villages in Mali all ready for sale. They are dipped in some sort of petroleum product - maybe sump oil - It gives the piece a smelly sticky black patina which eventually dries and hardens. It is used there to deter termites and is the fastest way to apply a darkened patina. The patina is horrible. I have not purchased any of these pieces but I imagine the smell would linger for some time.
                                  Don't know what would happen to this patina if it were sprayed with petrol.

                                  Repeated freezing and heating does work for most infestations. It is simple clean and safe. The process needs to be repeated as eggs are not always destroyed with freezing. Warm them up, get the eggs moving then freeze them again.

                                  Commercial fumigants can be a problem and damage some materials however most developed countries use gas which penetrates wood and dissipates without leaving any traces. If properly applied it is safe. These gasses are used for plants and many other products.
                                  5. What chemicals are used in fumigation and how safe are they?
                                  Fumigations are carried out using essentially two chemicals, with three variants. The chemicals used are Vikane Gas Fumigant (Sulfural Fluoride) and Methyl Bromide, also a gas fumigant. The three variations are, fumigating with Vikane, fumigating with Methyl Bromide alone and fumigating with lesser amounts of Methyl Bromide mixed with Carbon Dioxide (this is known as the Makr System). The most popular fumigant in use today is Vikane. As with the other gases it is odorless and colorless and leaves no residue. It penetrates the Termites' habitat very quickly and dissipates very quickly. The Methyl Bromide variants tend to be a bit slower acting and take longer to thoroughly dissipate from the structure. Methyl Bromide can be problematical in that when it contacts materials found in the home which contain natural rubber or other substances processed with a high Sulfur content, a reaction can occur which causes an obnoxious odor (like rotten eggs) which is very difficult to remove. This is not a problem if the occupant and a professional fumigator work together, to identify and remove items from the property which may cause the odor causing reaction. The advantage of Methyl Bromide (when used by itself) is that it is a very good ovicide, which is to say it kills off the insects' eggs. This is especially important when the pest involved is of the Beetle family, as their young can fend for themselves after their eggs hatch. With termites the young must be nurtured by adults (as with mammals) until they grow enough to become self sufficient. Therefore, with termites if you kill off the adults you have effectively solved the problem. With beetles, you must also kill off the eggs. Vikane can be used for beetles; but at a much higher dosage rate, which becomes more expensive. Methyl Bromide is said to be an Ozone depleter and has come into disfavor, especially amongst environmentalists. The evidence of that is very, very, vague. The fact that Methyl Bromide is produced naturally by the evaporation of sea water from the oceans seems to have escaped the environmentalists' rationale. The cost for fumigating for Drywood Termites generally does not vary with the fumigant used. Treating beetles with Vikane will be more expensive than if Methyl Bromide is used. When used properly, and with normal precautions being taken, fumigants are very safe. Thousands of homes are fumigated each and every month with no health problems arising. Concerned occupants should speak to their fumigator to take any special precautions they feel are needed. This typically means extending the aeration time for additional ventilation. Because fumigants are true gases, there is no residue left behind when they leave a structure. This means that the occupant need not worry about washing all of the dishes etc; or for the safety of young children and pets who often put strange things in their mouths. We, and many other fumigators, have fumigated structures where people residing therein are pregnant, have respiratory problems, have severe allergies and various other difficulties, or special circumstances, and have never experienced any problems associated with the fumigation. Once the gas is gone there is nothing left behind.
                                  regards
                                  ann



                                  On 09/04/2007, at 3:51 AM, Erik Lewandowski wrote:


                                  I have successfully but not scientifically used mothballs to get rid of the bugs in two/three of my objects. That method is only good if used with a smaller size objects like masks or small figures. There are some commercial bags that can handle larger pieces, but this could be tricky to get your hands on one of them because they are not available for purchase to general public, unless you try internet. I had double bagged object with mothballs and left it for a month. I did work for me, I did not noticed the evidence of bug activity any more. Before taking object into the house I let it air out either in my garage or outside (weather permitting) to get rid off the smell of mothballs. As I said this is not proven scientifically, just from my own experience.  
                                   
                                  Regards,
                                  Erik

                                  craig lewis <craig_n_emma@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:
                                  I've never heard of the "gasoline" method (wouldn't it affect affect painted pieces?)  and would probably agree with Steve that the freezing method may be the safest and best.
                                  However I really wish I lived in the US where gasoline is ONLY
                                   $3 a gallon rather than the UK where it is the equivalent of around $8-$9 per gallon!!!  
                                  Cheers
                                  Craig 
                                  David Rilling <krilling@tradenet.net> wrote:
                                  I agree with Chris. An old woodworker told me about this some years ago. I've used the method on small and large pieces with 100% success for many years. I take the piece outside and soak it with gasoline thoroughly. Then I leave it outside for about a week until the gasoline odor leaves. Believe it or not this really works well, is harmless and does not affect the piece in any way. Not the surface nor the patina nor the color. I highly recommend it. Even with gasoline at $3 a gallon. The other method is bromide fumigation which costs $500. I'll go with the gas.
                                  Dave Rilling
                                  Gallerie Nimba


                                  On Apr 8, 2007, at 8:40 AM, teapotd0me wrote:

                                  A fellow member suggested a thorough flushing of the affected area with
                                  gasoline. I tried this on one piece with success. The gasoline odor
                                  will fade away after a week or so.

                                  HTH
                                  Chris

                                  --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "Bill Marsh" <woolygums@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Recently I bought a Bobo mask. It has a little damage from insects.
                                  >
                                  > Well I dusted it off and hung it on my wall. Well the dust is still
                                  > coming. Very fine wood dust.
                                  >
                                  > I Think that something is living in there and eating my mask!!!
                                  >
                                  > I took it down and put it out in my warehouse, isolating it from
                                  > everything.
                                  >
                                  > I don't see anything going on with other masks hung near it, but I am
                                  > a little concerned. It took about three months to make maybe a
                                  > teaspoon of dust.
                                  >
                                  > What should I do?
                                  >




                                  The all-new Yahoo! Mail goes wherever you go - free your email address from your Internet provider.



                                • Coleman E. McCaskey III
                                  I’ve found that the freezer method works in some cases but not all the time, possibly because of residual eggs. I have seen it mentioned somewhere (although
                                  Message 16 of 20 , Apr 8, 2007
                                  • 0 Attachment

                                    I’ve found that the freezer method works in some cases but not all the time, possibly because of residual eggs.  I have seen it mentioned somewhere (although I can’t remember where) that the piece should be placed in the freezer for a week, taken out and placed in the sun and then placed in the freezer again after several weeks (perhaps to deal with newly hatched worms).  I have also successfully treated some pieces by using a pesticide and applying it heavily to the areas that have the tiny holes. Just my 2 cents, which would only buy a few drops of gas.   Coleman


                                    --
                                    No virus found in this incoming message.
                                    Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                                    Version: 7.5.446 / Virus Database: 269.0.0/751 - Release Date: 4/7/2007 10:57 PM


                                    --
                                    No virus found in this outgoing message.
                                    Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                                    Version: 7.5.446 / Virus Database: 269.0.0/751 - Release Date: 4/7/2007 10:57 PM

                                  • Steve Price
                                    Hi Coleman The way the freeze-thaw method works is by freezing the water inside the cells. This kills the cells when it thaws, most likely by puncturing their
                                    Message 17 of 20 , Apr 8, 2007
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      Hi Coleman

                                      The way the freeze-thaw method works is by freezing the water inside
                                      the cells. This kills the cells when it thaws, most likely by
                                      puncturing their membranes with ice crystals.

                                      The reason a zero degree freezer is needed is that the fluid inside
                                      cells isn't just water, and doesn't freeze at the freezing point of
                                      pure water. The length of time it takes to freeze everything inside
                                      depends on the temperature of the freezer, of course, but also on the
                                      thickness of the wood, which is a pretty good insulator. I suspect
                                      that the larvae are much easier to kill than the eggs, since any
                                      treatment that just disables them vis-a-vis eating and reproducing is
                                      as good as killing every cell in their bodies from the standpoint of
                                      dealing with the infestation of a sculpture. If, for example, a
                                      treatment killed half their muscle cells, it would be successful.

                                      Regards

                                      Steve Price

                                      --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "Coleman E. McCaskey III"
                                      <Coleman@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > I've found that the freezer method works in some cases but not all
                                      the
                                      > time, possibly because of residual eggs. I have seen it mentioned
                                      > somewhere (although I can't remember where) that the piece should be
                                      > placed in the freezer for a week, taken out and placed in the sun
                                      and
                                      > then placed in the freezer again after several weeks (perhaps to
                                      deal
                                      > with newly hatched worms). I have also successfully treated some
                                      pieces
                                      > by using a pesticide and applying it heavily to the areas that have
                                      the
                                      > tiny holes. Just my 2 cents, which would only buy a few drops of
                                      gas.
                                      > Coleman
                                      >
                                      > --
                                      > No virus found in this incoming message.
                                      > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                                      > Version: 7.5.446 / Virus Database: 269.0.0/751 - Release Date:
                                      4/7/2007
                                      > 10:57 PM
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > --
                                      > No virus found in this outgoing message.
                                      > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                                      > Version: 7.5.446 / Virus Database: 269.0.0/751 - Release Date:
                                      4/7/2007
                                      > 10:57 PM
                                      >
                                    • Coleman E. McCaskey III
                                      Thanks for the info Steve. By the way, I have found that it is possible for the infestation to migrate to other pieces. In my case the pieces were in very
                                      Message 18 of 20 , Apr 9, 2007
                                      • 0 Attachment

                                        Thanks for the info Steve.  By the way, I have found that it is possible for the infestation to migrate to other pieces.  In my case the pieces were in very close proximity. 

                                         

                                        Coleman

                                        -----Original Message-----
                                        From: African_Arts@yahoogroups.com [mailto:African_Arts@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Steve Price
                                        Sent:
                                        Sunday, April 08, 2007 10:09 PM
                                        To: African_Arts@yahoogroups.com
                                        Subject: [African_Arts] Re: Bugs in a Bobo mask????? easy eradication!!

                                         

                                      • Steve Price
                                        Hi Coleman The life cycle of the little beasties is to mate, the female lays eggs in or on something made of wood, the eggs hatch into larvae, the larvae make
                                        Message 19 of 20 , Apr 9, 2007
                                        • 0 Attachment
                                          Hi Coleman

                                          The life cycle of the little beasties is to mate, the female lays
                                          eggs in or on something made of wood, the eggs hatch into larvae, the
                                          larvae make tunnels and damage the wood, eventually they become
                                          adults which mate and start the whole cycle over again.

                                          If enough adults emerge at about the same time, the likelihood that a
                                          male and a female will meet, fall in lust, and make babies is pretty
                                          high. When that happens, the original piece and any nearby wood that
                                          doesn't have a surface coating is likely to become infested.

                                          Show them no mercy!

                                          Regards

                                          Steve Price

                                          --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, "Coleman E. McCaskey III"
                                          <Coleman@...> wrote:
                                          >
                                          > Thanks for the info Steve. By the way, I have found that it is
                                          possible
                                          > for the infestation to migrate to other pieces. In my case the
                                          pieces
                                          > were in very close proximity.
                                          >
                                          > Coleman
                                          > -----Original Message-----
                                          > From: African_Arts@yahoogroups.com
                                          [mailto:African_Arts@yahoogroups.com]
                                          > On Behalf Of Steve Price
                                          > Sent: Sunday, April 08, 2007 10:09 PM
                                          > To: African_Arts@yahoogroups.com
                                          > Subject: [African_Arts] Re: Bugs in a Bobo mask????? easy
                                          eradication!!
                                          >
                                          > Hi Coleman
                                          >
                                          > The way the freeze-thaw method works is by freezing the water
                                          inside
                                          > the cells. This kills the cells when it thaws, most likely by
                                          > puncturing their membranes with ice crystals.
                                          >
                                          > The reason a zero degree freezer is needed is that the fluid inside
                                          > cells isn't just water, and doesn't freeze at the freezing point of
                                          > pure water. The length of time it takes to freeze everything inside
                                          > depends on the temperature of the freezer, of course, but also on
                                          the
                                          > thickness of the wood, which is a pretty good insulator. I suspect
                                          > that the larvae are much easier to kill than the eggs, since any
                                          > treatment that just disables them vis-a-vis eating and reproducing
                                          is
                                          > as good as killing every cell in their bodies from the standpoint
                                          of
                                          > dealing with the infestation of a sculpture. If, for example, a
                                          > treatment killed half their muscle cells, it would be successful.
                                          >
                                          > Regards
                                          >
                                          > Steve Price
                                          >
                                          > --- In HYPERLINK
                                          > "mailto:African_Arts%40yahoogroups.com"African_Arts@...,
                                          > "Coleman E. McCaskey III"
                                          > <Coleman@> wrote:
                                          > >
                                          > > I've found that the freezer method works in some cases but not
                                          all
                                          > the
                                          > > time, possibly because of residual eggs. I have seen it mentioned
                                          > > somewhere (although I can't remember where) that the piece should
                                          be
                                          > > placed in the freezer for a week, taken out and placed in the sun
                                          > and
                                          > > then placed in the freezer again after several weeks (perhaps to
                                          > deal
                                          > > with newly hatched worms). I have also successfully treated some
                                          > pieces
                                          > > by using a pesticide and applying it heavily to the areas that
                                          have
                                          > the
                                          > > tiny holes. Just my 2 cents, which would only buy a few drops of
                                          > gas.
                                          > > Coleman
                                          > >
                                          > > --
                                          > > No virus found in this incoming message.
                                          > > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                                          > > Version: 7.5.446 / Virus Database: 269.0.0/751 - Release Date:
                                          > 4/7/2007
                                          > > 10:57 PM
                                          > >
                                          > >
                                          > > --
                                          > > No virus found in this outgoing message.
                                          > > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                                          > > Version: 7.5.446 / Virus Database: 269.0.0/751 - Release Date:
                                          > 4/7/2007
                                          > > 10:57 PM
                                          > >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          > --
                                          > No virus found in this incoming message.
                                          > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                                          > Version: 7.5.446 / Virus Database: 269.0.0/751 - Release Date:
                                          4/7/2007
                                          > 10:57 PM
                                          >
                                          >
                                          > --
                                          > No virus found in this outgoing message.
                                          > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                                          > Version: 7.5.446 / Virus Database: 269.0.0/752 - Release Date:
                                          4/8/2007
                                          > 8:34 PM
                                          >
                                        • GARYGLS2000@aol.com
                                          Just for everyone s information, my sister stored several pieces of my African art in her attic including a Bobo mask. They ve been up there, untouched for
                                          Message 20 of 20 , Apr 9, 2007
                                          • 0 Attachment
                                            Just for everyone's information, my sister stored several pieces of my African art in her attic including a Bobo mask. They've been up there, untouched for over twenty years, and all in proximity of one another. Since she's moving to a new house, we brought everything down this weekend. All of the pieces were covered with wood dust. The Bobo mask had completely disintegrated due to wood worms and all of the dust was from that one piece. None of the other twelve pieces were affected in any way.
                                             
                                            Gary




                                            See what's free at AOL.com.
                                          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.