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Another mystery figure

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  • bobbold2000
    Hello fellow members, I thank everyone who helped identify the Fon Hohovi. Here is another figure that has me stumped. It is 10.3 inches high and is carved out
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 1 6:17 PM
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      Hello fellow members,

      I thank everyone who helped identify the Fon Hohovi. Here is another
      figure that has me stumped. It is 10.3 inches high and is carved out of
      heavy hardwood. Your opinion will again be appreciated.


      http://ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/African_Arts/photos/view/405b?b=5
    • GARYGLS2000@aol.com
      Just a guess, but it has certain Mende qualities - the face, hairstyle. The Mende of Sierra Leone, as well as the Dan from Liberia, Cote d-Ivoire, made staffs
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 1 7:42 PM
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        Just a guess, but it has certain Mende qualities - the face, hairstyle. The Mende of Sierra Leone, as well as the Dan from Liberia, Cote d-Ivoire, made staffs of authority similar to this object. Then again, it could be from East Africa, an area I'm unfamiliar with.




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      • Alexander Bortolot
        My first reaction is that it s an eastern Congo take on a form common to Tanzania, which is a cylindrical body with breasts and navel surmounted by a human
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 2 8:44 AM
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          My first reaction is that it's an eastern Congo take
          on a form common to Tanzania, which is a cylindrical
          body with breasts and navel surmounted by a human
          head. Check out Marc Felix's "Mwana Hiti" for
          examples from Kwere, etc, and also Alan Roberts' book
          on Tabwa art for versions of the form produced by
          Tabwa carvers. I don't have these books in front of
          me at the moment so I can't comment on dimensions -
          perhaps others in this group will have more to add.

          Cheers,
          Alex

          --- bobbold2000 <bob.ibold@...> wrote:

          > Hello fellow members,
          >
          > I thank everyone who helped identify the Fon Hohovi.
          > Here is another
          > figure that has me stumped. It is 10.3 inches high
          > and is carved out of
          > heavy hardwood. Your opinion will again be
          > appreciated.
          >
          >
          >
          http://ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/African_Arts/photos/view/405b?b=5
          >
          >




          ____________________________________________________________________________________
          8:00? 8:25? 8:40? Find a flick in no time
          with the Yahoo! Search movie showtime shortcut.
          http://tools.search.yahoo.com/shortcuts/#news
        • leerubinstein
          Bob: Like Gary, I was first prompted by the hairstyle to consider Mende and related origins for your object. However, as suggested by Alex, I am more inclined
          Message 4 of 5 , Apr 3 8:48 AM
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            Bob:

            Like Gary, I was first prompted by the hairstyle to consider Mende and related origins for
            your object. However, as suggested by Alex, I am more inclined to look far across the
            continent toward the eastern central region for comparative examples that might support
            a possible conclusion that it is a Luba divination pestle without the attached medicinal
            bundles that are ritually attached to these objects' bases. The notch at the base of your
            "figure" suggest the possibility that there was previously an attached element that is no
            longer present. Although different in carving style, there are two examples in Mary N. and
            Allen F. Roberts' Memory: Luba Art and the Making of History, pp. 178-179 (Catalogue
            Nos. 72 and 73). Other possibilities worth considering include knife/axe handles or staff
            finials. Surveying hairstyles among diverse Luba (and related) figures may also be
            productive in determining a region of origin.

            Lee

            --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, Alexander Bortolot <lyautua@...> wrote:
            >
            > My first reaction is that it's an eastern Congo take
            > on a form common to Tanzania, which is a cylindrical
            > body with breasts and navel surmounted by a human
            > head. Check out Marc Felix's "Mwana Hiti" for
            > examples from Kwere, etc, and also Alan Roberts' book
            > on Tabwa art for versions of the form produced by
            > Tabwa carvers. I don't have these books in front of
            > me at the moment so I can't comment on dimensions -
            > perhaps others in this group will have more to add.
            >
            > Cheers,
            > Alex
            >
            > --- bobbold2000 <bob.ibold@...> wrote:
            >
            > > Hello fellow members,
            > >
            > > I thank everyone who helped identify the Fon Hohovi.
            > > Here is another
            > > figure that has me stumped. It is 10.3 inches high
            > > and is carved out of
            > > heavy hardwood. Your opinion will again be
            > > appreciated.
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > http://ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/African_Arts/photos/view/405b?b=5
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > ____________________________________________________________________________________
            > 8:00? 8:25? 8:40? Find a flick in no time
            > with the Yahoo! Search movie showtime shortcut.
            > http://tools.search.yahoo.com/shortcuts/#news
            >
          • Bob Ibold
            Lee, Thanks for your excellent suggestions on this figure. I will follow your leads this evening with more research. I had a Luba (or possibly Hemba) staff top
            Message 5 of 5 , Apr 3 10:23 AM
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              Lee,
              Thanks for your excellent suggestions on this figure. I will follow your leads this evening with more research.

              I had a Luba (or possibly Hemba) staff top not too long ago. The shank had obviously been sawed off. On this piece there is no evidence of that. Of course, it wouldn't be hard for someone to make it look like a normal bottom... so I'm not going to rule out the possibility.

              Bob


              At 11:48 AM 4/3/2007, you wrote:

              Bob:

              Like Gary, I was first prompted by the hairstyle to consider Mende and related origins for
              your object. However, as suggested by Alex, I am more inclined to look far across the
              continent toward the eastern central region for comparative examples that might support
              a possible conclusion that it is a Luba divination pestle without the attached medicinal
              bundles that are ritually attached to these objects' bases. The notch at the base of your
              "figure" suggest the possibility that there was previously an attached element that is no
              longer present. Although different in carving style, there are two examples in Mary N. and
              Allen F. Roberts' Memory: Luba Art and the Making of History, pp. 178-179 (Catalogue
              Nos. 72 and 73). Other possibilities worth considering include knife/axe handles or staff
              finials. Surveying hairstyles among diverse Luba (and related) figures may also be
              productive in determining a region of origin.

              Lee

              --- In African_Arts@yahoogroups.com, Alexander Bortolot <lyautua@...> wrote:
              >
              > My first reaction is that it's an eastern Congo take
              > on a form common to Tanzania, which is a cylindrical
              > body with breasts and navel surmounted by a human
              > head. Check out Marc Felix's "Mwana Hiti" for
              > examples from Kwere, etc, and also Alan Roberts' book
              > on Tabwa art for versions of the form produced by
              > Tabwa carvers. I don't have these books in front of
              > me at the moment so I can't comment on dimensions -
              > perhaps others in this group will have more to add.
              >
              > Cheers,
              > Alex
              >
              > --- bobbold2000 <bob.ibold@...> wrote:
              >
              > > Hello fellow members,
              > >
              > > I thank everyone who helped identify the Fon Hohovi.
              > > Here is another
              > > figure that has me stumped. It is 10.3 inches high
              > > and is carved out of
              > > heavy hardwood. Your opinion will again be
              > > appreciated.
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > http://ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/African_Arts/photos/view/405b?b=5
              > >
              > >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > __________________________________________________________
              > 8:00? 8:25? 8:40? Find a flick in no time
              > with the Yahoo! Search movie showtime shortcut.
              > http://tools.search.yahoo.com/shortcuts/#news
              >


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