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Re: [African_Arts] Looking for information on wood scuplture

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  • LRubinstein@post.harvard.edu
    Dear Lisa: Thanks for your inquiry and for posting the image of your sculpted figure. It s hard to tell much from the image but...the sculpture you are
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 4 2:22 PM
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      Dear Lisa:
       
      Thanks for your inquiry and for posting the image of your sculpted figure.
       
      It's hard to tell much from the image but...the sculpture you are querying does show some similarities to contemporary carvings -- mostly in stone --  coming from Eastern Africa -- Kenya, Zimbabwe, perhaps Tanzania -- although my perception may be clouded by my limited exposure to such carvings.  Nonetheless, you may find it interesting to take a look at these links to images by two Zimbabwean stone carvers:
       
      Fabian Madamombe:
      "The Old Herdman":
      "Going Home at Last":
       
      Lazarus Takawira:
      "The Last Plea"
       
      Stone is the more common medium in Zimbabwe.  For you -- and any others who may be interested, you can see a good selection of Zimbabwean stone sculpture at this link from the same site.
       
      Information helpful in identifying your figure may be the weight of the wood and, more specifically the type of wood.  If you have any local sculptors who work in wood (or anyone who is well-versed in wood such as furniture makers and dealers), you may be able to determine the origin of your piece by identifying the wood itself and then its place of origin (or at least a range of places).  Someone who is familiar with carving techniques and tools may have a better eye to help identify the method and materials used in the carving which will also help you to narrow down the source locale.
       
      I am curious whether you have any information at all that suggested to you a possibly African origin (some information from your home's previous resident perhaps)?  Also, did you look on, around or under the base for any markings or a signature?  Other points of information that might be illuminating are any clues that can be ascertained from the hairstyle and "dress" of your figure -- both difficult to discern from the image posted.
       
      Lee
    • Claes Laasonen
      Thank you Lee for the links to the Zimbabwean shona stonescultpures. There was some amazing pieces. I am myself travelling to Zimbabwe again this week and it
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 10 9:40 AM
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        Thank you Lee for the links to the Zimbabwean shona stonescultpures. There was some amazing pieces. I am myself travelling to Zimbabwe again this week and it makes me look forward to it very much.
         
        Claes

        LRubinstein@... skrev:
        Dear Lisa:
         
        Thanks for your inquiry and for posting the image of your sculpted figure.
         
        It's hard to tell much from the image but...the sculpture you are querying does show some similarities to contemporary carvings -- mostly in stone --  coming from Eastern Africa -- Kenya, Zimbabwe, perhaps Tanzania -- although my perception may be clouded by my limited exposure to such carvings.  Nonetheless, you may find it interesting to take a look at these links to images by two Zimbabwean stone carvers:
         
        Fabian Madamombe:
        "The Old Herdman":
        "Going Home at Last":
         
        Lazarus Takawira:
        "The Last Plea"
         
        Stone is the more common medium in Zimbabwe.  For you -- and any others who may be interested, you can see a good selection of Zimbabwean stone sculpture at this link from the same site.
         
        Information helpful in identifying your figure may be the weight of the wood and, more specifically the type of wood.  If you have any local sculptors who work in wood (or anyone who is well-versed in wood such as furniture makers and dealers), you may be able to determine the origin of your piece by identifying the wood itself and then its place of origin (or at least a range of places).  Someone who is familiar with carving techniques and tools may have a better eye to help identify the method and materials used in the carving which will also help you to narrow down the source locale.
         
        I am curious whether you have any information at all that suggested to you a possibly African origin (some information from your home's previous resident perhaps)?  Also, did you look on, around or under the base for any markings or a signature?  Other points of information that might be illuminating are any clues that can be ascertained from the hairstyle and "dress" of your figure -- both difficult to discern from the image posted.
         
        Lee

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