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Re: [AandS50ChallengeCommunity] Yellow food coloring

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  • lilinah-h
    ... One of the most common yellow dye plants in the Old World in SCA-period is weld, Reseda luteola. It produces a bright and fast yellow. The plant s native
    Message 1 of 21 , Sep 15, 2013
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      Anastasia wrote:
      > One of my apprentices did a [dyeing] project a few years ago, we did a study in
      > yellow so we tried 8 different stuffs. Calendula works but you need a lot of it
      > to get a decent color, safflower works real well, turmeric gets you more of a
      > mustard yellow depending on the mordant, but for food, all of these are safe.
      > Goldenrod not so much in our study, have to get all the petals off, and you
      > need a ton of it to get anything.

      One of the most common yellow dye plants in the Old World in SCA-period is weld, Reseda luteola. It produces a bright and fast yellow. The plant's native range extends from the Canary Islands, through the Mediterranean, to India.

      On the other hand, from what i've been reading, the vast majority of goldenrod species are from the Americas, including the variety known as "dyers weed", and essentially out of period for the SCA. Dyeing with them may be possible, however, from my reading it appears that the few varieties native to southwest Asia were used primarily as medicinals. A few varieties are grown by British gardeners, but these were originally North American, not European natives. For the most part North American varieties are now invasive species in Europe and Asia, displacing native vegetation from its natural habitat.

      Urtatim (that's oor-tah-TEEM)
    • hkubasch
      I would like to use calendula, but I couldn t find any documentation on it being used as a coloring agent in period. I realize safflower would probably work
      Message 2 of 21 , Sep 16, 2013
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        I would like to use calendula, but I couldn't find any documentation on it being used as a coloring agent in period. I realize safflower would probably work best, but I am not sure that a late 15th cent. Viennese lady would have access to it, while I know she had access to calendula. I tend to associate safflower with Japan because of the lovely film "Only Yesterday" in which growing & harvesting safflower plays a major role.

        BTW I would like to take this opportunity to thank everyone on the list for their helpful input.

        Heike

        Sent from AOL Mobile Mail


        -----Original Message-----
        From: lilinah <lilinah@...>
        To: AandS50ChallengeCommunity <AandS50ChallengeCommunity@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Mon, Sep 16, 2013 05:47 AM
        Subject: Re: [AandS50ChallengeCommunity] Yellow food coloring


         

        Anastasia wrote:

        > One of my apprentices did a [dyeing] project a few years ago, we did a study in
        > yellow so we tried 8 different stuffs. Calendula works but you need a lot of it
        > to get a decent color, safflower works real well, turmeric gets you more of a
        > mustard yellow depending on the mordant, but for food, all of these are safe.
        > Goldenrod not so much in our study, have to get all the petals off, and you
        > need a ton of it to get anything.

        One of the most common yellow dye plants in the Old World in SCA-period is weld, Reseda luteola. It produces a bright and fast yellow. The plant's native range extends from the Canary Islands, through the Mediterranean, to India.

        On the other hand, from what i've been reading, the vast majority of goldenrod species are from the Americas, including the variety known as "dyers weed", and essentially out of period for the SCA. Dyeing with them may be possible, however, from my reading it appears that the few varieties native to southwest Asia were used primarily as medicinals. A few varieties are grown by British gardeners, but these were originally North American, not European natives. For the most part North American varieties are now invasive species in Europe and Asia, displacing native vegetation from its natural habitat.

        Urtatim (that's oor-tah-TEEM)

      • Ségnat ingen Fháeláin
        Burning an herb, otherwise known as burning incense, is very unlikely to set off your allergies. I have friends who make kyphi-style bioregional incense
        Message 3 of 21 , Sep 16, 2013
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          Burning an herb,  otherwise known as  burning incense,   is very unlikely to set off your allergies.  I have friends who make kyphi-style  bioregional incense from just about every combination of plant and resin out there and I’ve never heard of anyone having a problem with anything they burn.  I wouldn’t worry on it if I were you.

          The pollens  and spores which cause allergies are destroyed when they are burned.  In fact,  one of my mundane friend burns her prairie in the fall  to keep her hay fever under control because it incinerates the ragweed pollen.  

          I think the candles sound very interesting and you’ve had good suggestions, safflower, saffron, annatto.    Salvia officinalis tops make a yellow dye when you use alum as a mordant. 

           I am, however,  wondering  why you wouldn’t have had access to turmeric in the 15th Century?

          It’s been used in India for at least 4000 years.  The oldest written documentation is a formula was by Susruta in 250 BC.  It was in  China by about 700  AD and West Africa by probably 1100 AD.   So it was pretty widely available by the 15th century.    Marco Polo wrote about it in 1280 AD, so obviously he was hauling it.    In fact,  there is a word Middle English turmeryte which has been around since the 15th century which leads me to believe that they had access to the herb.   

          I know that it isn’t in the cookbooks, but that doesn’t mean it wasn’t being used.  It just means it wasn’t typical to see it used as an ingredient in food.   It is in the herbals.   Culpeper and Gerard both mention it.   

           

          I have extensive allergies; if I have a reaction to the candles I will let everyone know.

           

          Regards

          Heike

           



          Sent from AOL Mobile Mail


          -----Original Message-----
          From: Dianna <avacyn@...>
          To: AandS50ChallengeCommunity <AandS50ChallengeCommunity@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Sun, Sep 15, 2013 03:26 AM
          Subject: Re: [AandS50ChallengeCommunity] Yellow food coloring

           

          I'm still confused on why you are making edible candles. Not everything
          that is safe to eat is safe to burn. For candles, I'd be much more
          cautious about which herbs could be safely burned without causing hay fever.
          Dianna

        • JO BURROWS
          Actually any airborne particulate (ie smoke, dust, etc.) can be a potential irritant, if there is a sensitivity. While not a true allergen (a protein that
          Message 4 of 21 , Sep 16, 2013
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            Actually any airborne particulate (ie smoke, dust, etc.) can be a potential irritant, if there is a sensitivity. While not a true allergen (a protein that triggers an IgE antibody reaction), can still generate similar effects (headaches, swelling, rashes, rhinitis, or coughing, for example), so be cautious in that respect.
            cheers
            Tanikh

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Ségnat ingen Fháeláin" <iron.age.celts@...>
            To: AandS50ChallengeCommunity@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Monday, September 16, 2013 7:02:17 AM
            Subject: RE: [AandS50ChallengeCommunity] Yellow food coloring









            Burning an herb, otherwise known as burning incense, is very unlikely to set off your allergies. I have friends who make kyphi-style bioregional incense from just about every combination of plant and resin out there and I’ve never heard of anyone having a problem with anything they burn. I wouldn’t worry on it if I were you.

            The pollens and spores which cause allergies are destroyed when they are burned. In fact, one of my mundane friend burns her prairie in the fall to keep her hay fever under control because it incinerates the ragweed pollen.

            I think the candles sound very interesting and you’ve had good suggestions, safflower, saffron, annatto. Salvia officinalis tops make a yellow dye when you use alum as a mordant.

            I am, however, wondering why you wouldn’t have had access to turmeric in the 15 th Century?

            It’s been used in India for at least 4000 years. The oldest written documentation is a formula was by Susruta in 250 BC. It was in China by about 700 AD and West Africa by probably 1100 AD. So it was pretty widely available by the 15 th century. Marco Polo wrote about it in 1280 AD, so obviously he was hauling it. In fact, there is a word Middle English turmeryte which has been around since the 15 th century which leads me to believe that they had access to the herb.

            I know that it isn’t in the cookbooks, but that doesn’t mean it wasn’t being used. It just means it wasn’t typical to see it used as an ingredient in food. It is in the herbals. Culpeper and Gerard both mention it.







            I have extensive allergies; if I have a reaction to the candles I will let everyone know.





            Regards


            Heike







            Sent from AOL Mobile Mail


            -----Original Message-----
            From: Dianna < avacyn@... >
            To: AandS50ChallengeCommunity < AandS50ChallengeCommunity@yahoogroups.com >
            Sent: Sun, Sep 15, 2013 03:26 AM
            Subject: Re: [AandS50ChallengeCommunity] Yellow food coloring










            I'm still confused on why you are making edible candles. Not everything
            that is safe to eat is safe to burn. For candles, I'd be much more
            cautious about which herbs could be safely burned without causing hay fever.
            Dianna
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