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Re: [AandS50ChallengeCommunity] top talent or perfection required?

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  • Nancy McKay
    ... I just heard the most brilliant of statements at Pennsic - Practice makes progress! It really puts the focus of my own meager efforts into the proper
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 14, 2013
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      On 8/13/2013 10:23 PM, Susan wrote:
      >
      > This needs a gigantic "LIKE" button!
      >
      > Albreda the Unperfect!
      >
      > On Aug 13, 2013, at 8:32 PM, "katherine kerr" <vicki@...
      > <mailto:vicki%40webcentre.co.nz>> wrote:
      >
      > > > Sidney:
      > >
      > > > As an artist I am always telling people that "talent" is overrated.
      > > > It's just a starting point. It's the love of the art, whatever art it
      > > > is, which inspires artists to practice their art. Love of the art
      > > > makes it a joy, so we don't think of it as work. When you find an art
      > > > that you love (all things creative are art to me, not just painting or
      > > > drawing), practice and continual learning is what propels you to
      > > > achieve wonderful things. And no matter how good you get, it is never
      > > > perfect because there is always something more to learn and try.
      > >
      > > I've always thought that we tend to over-rate perfection in our
      > practice of the arts. We should
      > > bear in mind that the things that have survived are generally the
      > top end of the bell curve --
      > > they have survived precisely because they were the best of the best
      > and people saw fit to
      > > honour them by preserving them. Fair enough.
      > >
      > > But we're being a tad anal retentive in thinking that all blackwork
      > has to be reversible on
      > > 36-count linen, and killing our eyes to make it so. I was delighted
      > to see an example in the
      > > V&A of some rough-as-guts blackwork, the equivalent of using perle
      > cotton on 14-count Aida
      > > (which is what I used for my kid's cuffs, boy could you scrub it
      > when you needed to!). And
      > > loose gowns with panels of velvet pile going every which way.
      > >
      > > I tend to say these days that I don't do calligraphy, I do
      > handwriting. And I've got more than
      > > enough examples of uneven hands, sloping hands, smudged tear-stained
      > letters (Mary
      > > Queen of Scots produced lots of those), missives with cross-outs and
      > insertions etc in official
      > > correspondence that's been dashed off on a scrap of paper. One of
      > these days I may
      > > convince the Scribe's Guild that that is just as authentic as the
      > most perfect illuminated
      > > bastarda, but I'm not holding my breath....
      > >
      > > I was delighted to see the page in an early printed book which had
      > the clear imprint of a piece
      > > of type that had fallen out during the process and embedded in on
      > the page. Or, even better,
      > > the cat pawprints across one page, made on the day of printing 500
      > years ago. Lovely! So if a
      > > paper jam skews some of my chapbook pages on printout, I'm happy to
      > use them. My
      > > counterparts in the 1550s would have, and I've got the slack
      > examples to prove it. I've been
      > > known to deliberately skew woodcut graphics and spot-colour fills
      > just a tad to match the
      > > mis-registration you see in some texts. It may not be perfect, but
      > it's period.
      > >
      > > On the odd occasion when people ask me what my Laureldom was in, I
      > say "I'm a Laurel of
      > > the mediocre, and proud of it!" :-)
      > >
      > > Cheers,
      > > katherine
      > > =====================================
      > > katherine kerr of the Hermitage, in the Crescent Isles,
      > > Barony of Southron Gaard, Kingdom of Lochac
      > > http://webcentre.co.nz/kk
      > >
      > >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      I just heard the most brilliant of statements at Pennsic - Practice
      makes progress!

      It really puts the focus of my own meager efforts into the proper
      perspective.


      Nadyezhda the Simple


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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