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Re: [AandS50ChallengeCommunity] beasties and breeds

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  • Nest verch Tangwistel
    We have always kept chickens, and I have been eating our own raised chickens since I was a child. Every year we would get 25 hens of one breed for eggs and a
    Message 1 of 11 , Feb 15, 2013
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      We have always kept chickens, and I have been eating our own raised chickens since I was a child. Every year we would get 25 hens of one breed for eggs and a mix of cockrels for eating. They were always raised the same with store bought pellets available, but allowed outside to forage. I ahve to say, I have never noticed a difference in the flavors of different chickens anytime over the years.
       
      Nest

      From: Ted <alban@...>
      To: AandS50ChallengeCommunity@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wednesday, February 13, 2013 11:26 PM
      Subject: [AandS50ChallengeCommunity] beasties and breeds

      an odd question from way out in left field....

      From the research I've been doing on charcuterie, sausage-making, and the curing of various meat-related body parts, I realize that different breeds of pigs should be used for various things - one breed makes for wonderful prosciutto, another for Smithfield/picnic-type hams, a third for fatback, a fourth for, well, you get the idea. I know cow breeds differ a bit in taste, too: wagyu are well known for their incredible marbeling, and Black Angus make for decent steaks too, albeit not as buttery. There's a breed of ducks that came from Long Island much belovéd of Chinese chefs for Peking duck.

      But for the life of me no-one's ever mentioned one breed of chicken tasting any different from any other breed of chicken. There are good-eggers-for-hot-climates, good-eggers-for-humid-cold-climates, pretty-shell eggers....but nothing about taste.

      Do the various breeds of chicken taste different?

      (Like I said, an odd question, but I suspect a fair number of you raise chickens, buy chickens, cook chickens, deal with heritage breeds of chickens, so I thought this'd be a good place to ask.)

      And, yes, I am thinking of trying my hand at sausages and salume, charcuterie and confits, chickens and pigs and cows, oh my.

      Alban



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    • celticdragon38
      Folks in China actually prefer the feet from American chickens. There s more meat and it s more tender. I don t know if that s a product of the breed, the
      Message 2 of 11 , Feb 15, 2013
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        Folks in China actually prefer the feet from American chickens. There's more meat and it's more tender. I don't know if that's a product of the breed, the feed, or a combination of both.
        -Aritê

        --- In AandS50ChallengeCommunity@yahoogroups.com, "Diane" <bahriah@...> wrote:
        >
        > I did some QA work for a farmer who bred and sold Chinese silkies specifically for eating. He gave us one to try and it did have a nice flavour, a little more intense, but this could be because they have not been bred for copious quantities of white meat.
        > I do suspect the age, feeding and amount of exercise will have a significant impact, perhaps more so than breeds.
        > Don't forget that the feet are a delicacy (so long as you get the image of the things it has walked in out of your mind - I can't and have not tried it but maybe your stmach is stronger)
        >
        > YIS
        > Claricia
        >
        > --- In AandS50ChallengeCommunity@yahoogroups.com, "beorn_se_bacaire" wrote:
        > >
        > > Kinda an odd question for this group, unless you're doing 50 recipes for sausage, but ok... :P
        > >
        > > I've always understood that it depends more on the chicken's lifestyle, than the breed. However there are the Chinese Silkies, which have black skin and supposedly all dark meat, as well. Can't tell you for certain--we never slaughtered our chickens.
        > > And Silkies Are a period breed for the far East.
        > >
        > > Brann
        > >
        > >
        > > --- In AandS50ChallengeCommunity@yahoogroups.com, "Ted " wrote:
        > > >
        > > > an odd question from way out in left field....
        > > >
        > > .....
        > > >
        > > > But for the life of me no-one's ever mentioned one breed of chicken tasting any different from any other breed of chicken. There are good-eggers-for-hot-climates, good-eggers-for-humid-cold-climates, pretty-shell eggers....but nothing about taste.
        > > >
        > > > Do the various breeds of chicken taste different?
        > > >
        > > ....
        > >
        >
      • Madame du Pont
        And they love duck feet...they eat them like me eat potato chips. Mme du Pont, Kingdom de Meridies
        Message 3 of 11 , Feb 16, 2013
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          And they love duck feet...they eat them like me eat potato chips.
          Mme du Pont, Kingdom de Meridies


          --- In AandS50ChallengeCommunity@yahoogroups.com, "celticdragon38" <celticdragon38@...> wrote:
          >
          > Folks in China actually prefer the feet from American chickens. There's more meat and it's more tender. I don't know if that's a product of the breed, the feed, or a combination of both.
          > -Aritê
          >
          > --- In AandS50ChallengeCommunity@yahoogroups.com, "Diane" <bahriah@> wrote:
          > >
          > > I did some QA work for a farmer who bred and sold Chinese silkies specifically for eating. He gave us one to try and it did have a nice flavour, a little more intense, but this could be because they have not been bred for copious quantities of white meat.
          > > I do suspect the age, feeding and amount of exercise will have a significant impact, perhaps more so than breeds.
          > > Don't forget that the feet are a delicacy (so long as you get the image of the things it has walked in out of your mind - I can't and have not tried it but maybe your stmach is stronger)
          > >
          > > YIS
          > > Claricia
          > >
          > > --- In AandS50ChallengeCommunity@yahoogroups.com, "beorn_se_bacaire" wrote:
          > > >
          > > > Kinda an odd question for this group, unless you're doing 50 recipes for sausage, but ok... :P
          > > >
          > > > I've always understood that it depends more on the chicken's lifestyle, than the breed. However there are the Chinese Silkies, which have black skin and supposedly all dark meat, as well. Can't tell you for certain--we never slaughtered our chickens.
          > > > And Silkies Are a period breed for the far East.
          > > >
          > > > Brann
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > --- In AandS50ChallengeCommunity@yahoogroups.com, "Ted " wrote:
          > > > >
          > > > > an odd question from way out in left field....
          > > > >
          > > > .....
          > > > >
          > > > > But for the life of me no-one's ever mentioned one breed of chicken tasting any different from any other breed of chicken. There are good-eggers-for-hot-climates, good-eggers-for-humid-cold-climates, pretty-shell eggers....but nothing about taste.
          > > > >
          > > > > Do the various breeds of chicken taste different?
          > > > >
          > > > ....
          > > >
          > >
          >
        • tamrasedai
          I am sure you could find better informed folks on The Backyard Chickens forum (which I recommend highly to anyone who has/wants/is curious about chicken and
          Message 4 of 11 , Feb 18, 2013
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            I am sure you could find better informed folks on The Backyard Chickens
            forum (which I recommend highly to anyone who has/wants/is curious about chicken and other fowl) than I can provide, but here is what I as a
            novice have observed.

            I raise (and sometimes eat) chickens of a variety of breeds. I choose mine for usefulness (only dual purpose breeds for me!) temperament (I like my flock to have personalities, but I hate bullies) and appearance (I do feather crafts so I want as many colors and patterns as I can get!) That said, I have eaten several breeds... mostly surplus roosters... including Plymouth Rocks, Wyandottes, Orpingtons, Sussex, Ameracauna/EE, and a bunch of 'mutt' culls from my breeding project. ANY of the breeds I have listed taste better than the grocery store
            cornishX's. At least if you actually LIKE the taste of chicken.

            The big
            thing with chickens is that you have a pretty small window for getting a
            decent amount of tender meat. Too early and they are scrawny, too late
            and they are tough and stringy. The longer a chicken has been alive, the
            more chicken-y it tastes. The Cornish X's will only have made it to
            about 8 weeks, whereas I wouldn't even THINK of putting one of mine on
            the table till, at minimum, week 12. Some breeds mature very slowly
            (like the Jersey Giant) and would have a full, rich flavor, and some
            mature quickly. The food they eat and the exercise they get play a role,
            of course, but the maturity time is the really big deal. I have only eaten a few of each of these breeds, but there are differences for sure.

            The bird I recall being the best for the table was the Sussex. I only ate the one, but of all the ones I have dressed, that one was the neatest and easiest (also the saddest... These are the loveliest chickens you'll ever meet... I gave away most of my roosters to good homes because they were all too nice to eat). Second to the Sussex was the Orpington (though I didn't get to eat him; I donated him to the shire for the main dish to serve the high table at our feast) he also cleaned up nice and pretty.

            I know I am not being terribly helpful... but I am being as specific as I can. I often eat chickens who were slaughtered outside the ideal window and have to deal with that accordingly. Old, nasty-tempered roosters who have been replaced with much more chivalrous youngsters end up in the cock-pot. Young/scrawny ones culled in unfortunate circumstances get pieced out. The big batch that was right on time will end up with several different breeds of legs I can no longer tell apart on the barbeque together. Are the differences in texture and flavor my fault because of timing and the recipe? Or was it the breed?

            So I suppose the short answer is that yes, they taste different. Not a LOT different, but I am sure that is the same of cattle and pigs as well. Most people would never notice, but one who knows what they are doing could tell.

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Ted Eisenstein
            ... Isn t that what long, slow cooking is for - coq au vin, stewed chicken, and the like? Broilers cook quickly, as does fried chicken - but, like old stringy
            Message 5 of 11 , Feb 19, 2013
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              > The big
              > thing with chickens is that you have a pretty small window for getting a
              > decent amount of tender meat. Too early and they are scrawny, too late
              > and they are tough and stringy.
              Isn't that what long, slow cooking is for - coq au vin, stewed chicken,
              and the like? Broilers cook quickly, as does fried chicken - but, like
              old stringy beef, sometimes you just have to pour in the wine and
              spices, and let it slowly cook for hours?

              (At least that's what my bad memory for recipes says.)


              Alban
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