Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [AandS50ChallengeCommunity] Re: dying

Expand Messages
  • Andrea AskenDunn
    Oops, three years ago. :-) ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Message 1 of 40 , Feb 2, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      Oops, three years ago. :-)

      On Sat, Feb 2, 2013 at 5:41 PM, Andrea AskenDunn <askendunn@...>wrote:

      > Yes.
      > Sorry about the spelling. I started this thread with a question two years
      > ago, was corrected on the spelling right away, and the conversation lived a
      > natural life and died. (as it were) Then it was revived last month. Funny.
      > Asther
      >
      >
      > On Thu, Jan 31, 2013 at 9:28 AM, J.H. Grace <jh.grace@...> wrote:
      >
      >> **
      >>
      >>
      >> It was considered somewhat wasteful to use the edible parts of food for
      >> dyEing. Generally there wasn't a lot of food security. Excess from this
      >> year's crop would be either traded for some other necessities, or stored
      >> against next year's. However, using the non-edible bits for dyEing was an
      >> excellent use of what would otherwise be wasted. (And you thought New
      >> Englanders were "thrifty"!)
      >>
      >> That was one of the big things that the Puritans had against starched
      >> ruffs
      >> and collars: starch was extracted from grain -- so what could have been
      >> food was being used for "vanity".
      >>
      >> Hugh
      >>
      >>
      >> On 31 January 2013 08:21, fastusminimus cahuff@...> wrote:
      >>
      >> > And a note on the onion skins--if you run short, just chop up a few
      >> > whole onions and toss them in the pot....they work as well or better
      >> > than the skins!
      >> > Really.
      >> > Did this at a demo as we were short of skins, and it worked beautifully.
      >> > I really think the use of only skins is a bit of 'use it up/don't
      >> > waste/don't use perfectly good food' philosophy, and then got
      >> > reprinted from book to book as gospel.
      >> > Ta
      >> > Carol/Cele
      >> >
      >> > Of the craftsmen it may be said that in the handiwork of their craft
      >> > is their prayer.
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >
      >> > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >
      >> > ------------------------------------
      >> >
      >> > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >
      >>
      >> --
      >> They told me to "get a life". So I got one. Now I have no time to do
      >> anything!
      >>
      >> Fiber arts blog: http://hughtauerner.blogspot.com/
      >> Personal stuff is at Dreamwidth: http://hugh-mannity.dreamwidth.org/
      >>
      >>
      >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • lilinah-h
      ... Trying to dye cotton is as difficult as trying to dye linen, as both are cellulose fibers and they don t take most natural dyes. They can be colored, but
      Message 40 of 40 , Feb 6, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        Vasilisa wrote:
        > Actually, I believe cotton dyes quite easily. It is on linen that most (natural) dyes
        > don't take.

        Trying to dye cotton is as difficult as trying to dye linen, as both are cellulose fibers and they don't take most natural dyes.

        They can be colored, but the dye will not be fast and will fade and/or wash out. This is not considered desirable. Also, the color tends to be rather pale, also not a desirable trait within SCA-period.

        Both can be readily dyed with indigo, which is a vat dye and does not require a mordant. Any other dyes are much more difficult, if not nearly impossible to reach a saturated intense color. Madder is one of the few, but there are tricks to dyeing cotton and linen with madder, which Europeans didn't know until after the end of SCA-period, but which were used in the Middle East.

        Modernly cotton does dye well with FIBER REACTIVE DYES, as do linen, rayon, hemp, ramie, bamboo, and nettle. Procion dyes were the first readily available fiber reactive dye and they were introduced in 1956, well out of SCA-period. Fiber reactive dyes do not require mordants and dye in cold water, and are light fast and color fast (i.e., don't wash out). They often need a base added to make the water alkaline.

        I have limited experience dyeing (i took two dyeing classes in university) -- with natural dyes and with the mordants alum, tin, and chrome on a range of fibers/fabrics including cotton. Also with modern chemical indigo, with acid dyes (bubble bubble toil and trouble), and with Procion dyes. I prefer natural dyes, but while they work well on protein fibers -- wool and silk -- they don't work well on cellulose fibers -- linen and cotton.

        Urtatim (that's oor-tah-TEEM)
        the persona formerly known as Anahita
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.