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places

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  • katherine kerr
    ... Virtually every description I have ever seen describing the Hermitage (the big Border fortress I hail from) refers to it or the valley it rests in as:
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 5, 2012
      > Albreda -- re lovely and creepy landscapes:
      > That said, the Cheviots are lovely, and I think you describe them
      > well. (Some of the mountains of Southern Wales strike me with similar
      > feelings, although I do NOT usually look at life that way!)

      Virtually every description I have ever seen describing the Hermitage (the big Border fortress
      "I" hail from) refers to it or the valley it rests in as: sinister, blood-drenched, foreboding, stark,
      dour...

      Every time I have been there the sun has been shining, the birds singing, the Hermitage
      Water babbling....

      > Anyone else like working with maps?

      Ooo yes. I got to pore over Timpothy Pont's maps oo 1580-90s Scotland at the Royal Library
      of Scotland. Ye gods but that man could write in teeny-tiny lettering.

      Must dust my big Renaissance cartography books off and get that project kicked back into
      life (a large section of my history library has been stacked in along the walls for the past year;
      now that things have settled down -- touch wood and ignoring the little tremblor this morning
      -- perhaps it's time they get reshelved). Thanks for the prod!

      > Asther:
      > I am interested in this too, but unfortunately, my persona is not from
      > England. However, I did once (many years ago) see a blog or website or
      > something, about someone who was walking old pilgrimage routes through
      > England. Now, in addition to following old historical roads, they go
      > through back yards and laundromat parking lots and stuff, but there are
      > people who have them all mapped out. Pretty cool.

      Near Hyde in the Cotswolds, we found ourselves walking through someone's backyard with a
      public right of way mapped out in rope-and-stake just behind the kid's swings. Seemed very
      odd to us.

      Following on from that -- any chance that anyone has come across any maps or books on
      the old hollow-ways? They're the old paths that tend to be covered in hedge arches with the
      original walkways dropped down several feet below current ground level. I'd love to walk
      some of those.

      Cheers,
      katherine


      =====================================
      katherine kerr of the Hermitage, in the Crescent Isles,
      Barony of Southron Gaard, Kingdom of Lochac
      mka Vicki Hyde, Webwright, wordsmith
      printing, maps, children: http://webcentre.co.nz/kk
      Barony of Southron Gaard: http://sg.lochac.sca.org
    • Chris Taylor
      LOL! When I was there the Hermitage glowered in a field of snow under an iron gray sky... totally creeped us out! Maybe it likes you, which is a bit alarming
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 5, 2012
        LOL! When I was there the Hermitage glowered in a field of snow under an
        iron gray sky... totally creeped us out! Maybe it likes you, which is a bit
        alarming in and of itself.

        Caitlin

        Caitlin Christiana Wintour OL
        Ad augusta per angusta (To high places by narrow roads)



        -----Original Message-----
        From: AandS50ChallengeCommunity@yahoogroups.com
        [mailto:AandS50ChallengeCommunity@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of katherine
        kerr
        Sent: Monday, March 05, 2012 4:50 PM
        To: AandS50ChallengeCommunity@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [AandS50ChallengeCommunity] places

        Virtually every description I have ever seen describing the Hermitage (the
        big Border fortress "I" hail from) refers to it or the valley it rests in
        as: sinister, blood-drenched, foreboding, stark, dour...

        Every time I have been there the sun has been shining, the birds singing,
        the Hermitage Water babbling....

        Cheers,
        katherine
      • Susan
        Yes, I love the right-of-way laws in the UK - nothing like climbing over dozens of stiles and in amongst sheep to start one s day off right! (And yes, some go
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 5, 2012
          Yes, I love the right-of-way laws in the UK - nothing like climbing over dozens of stiles and in amongst sheep to start one's day off right! (And yes, some go in very odd, seemingly private places, but the paths were there first, and the folks built swingsets knowing they were there, so there you go!)


          I've not heard of any paths *called* hollow-ways, but I've certainly walked a few that had been etched into the earth's surface by the passage of many, many feet over time. :) ON a different but related note, I fondly remember climbing up onto the Westbury White Horse when I was a child, and sitting in the bowl of his eye. Victorian creation, most likely, but still fun, and kept there by modern interest.


          Anyone else seen the Mappa Mundi in Hereford, UK? Went there a few years ago (same day I went to Hay-on-Wye! Squee!) and it was fabulous. I find that few things put me in what I perceive to be a medieval mindset like looking at the world through the lens of a medieval map...


          Enjoy!
          Albreda




          -----Original Message-----
          From: katherine kerr <vicki@...>
          (big snip)




          Near Hyde in the Cotswolds, we found ourselves walking through someone's backyard with a
          public right of way mapped out in rope-and-stake just behind the kid's swings. Seemed very
          odd to us.

          Following on from that -- any chance that anyone has come across any maps or books on
          the old hollow-ways? They're the old paths that tend to be covered in hedge arches with the
          original walkways dropped down several feet below current ground level. I'd love to walk
          some of those.










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